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Posts Tagged ‘Gloucestershire’

Cornwall vs Glos Result (22.10.2011.)

Cornwall had a miserable time of it last year in the West of England stages of the Inter-County Championship, losing every single match. However, a new season has brought a change of fortunes as they drew 8-all in an evenly-matched affair against Gloucestershire last Saturday at Exminster.

Here are the details (Cornish names first and had Black on the odd-numbered boards).

1.J. Menadue (192) ½-½ N. Hosken (192). 2.L. Retallack (178) 1-0 C. Mattos (179). 3.M. Hassall (175) ½-½ I. Gallagher (177). 4.S. Bartlett (162) 1-0 J. Jenkins (177). 5.G. Healey (149) 0-1 D. Vaughan (165). 6.G. Trudeau (147) ½-½ P. Dodwell (162). 7.J. Nicholas (146) 0-1 P. Meade (161). 8.J. Wilman (141)1-0 A. Richards (140). 9.C. Sellwood (140) 1-0 P. Baker (147). 10.G. Lingard (137) 0-1 G. Brown (137). 11. C. Long (133) 0-1 M. Ashworth (132). 12. M. Hill (130) ½-½ I. Blencowe (130). 13.D. R.Jenkins (127) ½-½ R. Francis (129). 14.D. J. Jenkins (124) 0-1 P. Bending (124). 15.R. Smith (123) ½-½ M. Claypole (122). 15.T. Slade (122) 1-0 C. Harvey (109).

Both teams included promising youngsters and for Gloucestershire 12 year old Michael Ashworth of the Wotton Hall club, Gloucester, won his game, while the even younger Theo Slade (10) of Marhamchurch near Bude, won his for Cornwall. He is probably the youngest player to debut for Cornwall since Michael Adams, who then aged 8 with a grade of 101, played against Devon in November 1980, and look what happened to him.

The Four Nations Chess League (4NCL) held their annual Individual Rapidplay tournament last weekend at Newport Pagnell, won by Paignton’s Keith Arkell on 6/7 points, just ahead of Danny Gormally, Thomas Rendle and John Richardson who were 2nd=, half a point behind. Fifty competed.

The popular Guernsey Chess Festival which has been held all this week at the Peninsula Hotel and finishes today, regularly attracts a number of westcountry regulars of all strengths, who happily mix in with the overseas Grandmasters and  Guernsey locals. More details next week.

In last week’s position, White could simply play 1.QxR with the threat of 2.Qf7+ Kh8 3.Qg8 mate, and Black cannot take the queen because of 2.Re8 mate.

The laws of chess used to state simply that when a pawn reaches the furthest rank it may be exchanged for any piece, neglecting to specify that the new piece should be of the same colour as the pawn. This oversight was corrected in comparatively recent times, but before then, how might this lack of total clarity have enabled to White to mate in 1?

Using old Laws of Chess, White can mate in 1.

Devon Finish Season Winless (19.03.2011.)

A small piece of chess history was made at the weekend when Devon lost to Gloucestershire 7½-8½, in spite of outgrading them on every single board, thus completing a whitewash for the season, having lost every match played. The details were as follows (Devon names first): 1.Mackle ½-½ Gallagher. 2.Wheeler 0-1 Stewart. 3.Abbott 0-1 Jenkins. 4.Brusey 1–0 Waterfield. 5.Hewson 0–1 Lambourne. 6.Thynne 0–1 Meade. 7.Paulden ½-½ Dodwell. 8.Twine ½-½ Taylor. 9.Underwood ½-½ Dixon. 10.Regis 1-0 Bentley. 11.Duckham 0-1 Vaughan. 12.Ingham 1-0 Oliver. 13.Pollock 0-1 Whitelaw. 14.Schofield 1-0 Brown. 15.Brooks ½-½ Richards. 16.Toms 1-0 Baker.

Meanwhile, Cornwall went down to Somerset by 4½-9½ in a 14 board match at Exminster. The individual results were (Cornish names first): 1.Menadue 0-1 Rudd. 2.Hassall ½-½ Edgell. 3.Kneebone 0-1 Wong. 4.Bartlett 1-0 Hatchett. 5.Sellwood 0-1 Stuttard. 6.Nicholas 0-1 Kryyzanowski. 7.Healey 0-1 Footner. 8.Barkhuysen 0-1 Senior. 9.Trudeau ½-½ Purry. 10.Jenkins ½-½ Jepps. 11.Hill ½-½ Musson. 12.Long 1-0 Kilmister. 13.Lucas ½-½ Fewkes. Marjoram 0-1 Peters.

This miniature was one of the few bright spots for Devon in their recent match against Somerset.

White: Megan Owens (166). Black: Bill Ingham (164).

Old Indian Defence. [A55]

1.Nf3 d6 2.d4 c6 3.c4 Nf6 4.Nc3 Nbd7 5.e4 e5 White now neglects her piece development, indulging in some unforced pawn moves. 6.h3 Be7 7.b3 0–0 8.g3 exd4 9.Nxd4 d5 10.exd5 cxd5 11.Nc2 Still not developing new pieces.  Re8 12.Be3 Nb6 13.Be2 Bf5 14.c5 The stage is set for Black’s attack to begin. 14…Bxc2 15.Qxc2 d4 16.Rd1 Hoping to negate the fork. 16…Bxc5 17.Nb5 Bb4+ 18.Bd2 d3 19.Bxb4 If 19.Qb2 Rxe2+ 20.Kf1 Ne4 21.Qd4 Rxf2+ 22.Kg1 Bc5! 19…dxc2 20.Rxd8 c1Q+ 21.Rd1 Qc6! 0–1 The queen retreats to hit two more pieces, leaving White virtually a whole queen down.

In last week’s position, White mated with 1.Nb5! threatening 2.Nc7 mate and if the bishop takes it, there is 2.Qxb6 mate.

The 2011 British Solving Championship was held recently and finished in yet another triumph for John Nunn, who, as a result, now holds four major titles concurrently; World, European, British and International Solving Champion, a unique achievement. The 30 competitors had to try and solve 13 problems of increasing complexity, of which this is one of the three 2-movers – the easy ones at the start!

It was composed by the Revd. Gilbert Dodds in 1915 and first appeared in the American magazine, Good Companions. Black’s king cannot move, but how can White nail him in just two moves? A clue is that it revolves around the roles of the two queens.

White to mate in 2

Devon Lose – Again. (19.03.2011.)

A small piece of chess history was made at the weekend when Devon lost to Gloucestershire 7½-8½, in spite of outgrading them on every single board, thus completing a whitewash for the season, having lost every match played. The details were as follows (Devon names first): 1.Mackle ½-½ Gallagher. 2.Wheeler 0-1 Stewart. 3.Abbott 0-1 Jenkins. 4.Brusey 1–0 Waterfield. 5.Hewson 0–1 Lambourne. 6.Thynne 0–1 Meade. 7.Paulden ½-½ Dodwell. 8.Twine ½-½ Taylor. 9.Underwood ½-½ Dixon. 10.Regis 1-0 Bentley. 11.Duckham 0-1 Vaughan. 12.Ingham 1-0 Oliver. 13.Pollock 0-1 Whitelaw. 14.Schofield 1-0 Brown. 15.Brooks ½-½ Richards. 16.Toms 1-0 Baker.

Meanwhile, Cornwall went down to Somerset by 4½-9½ in a 14 board match at Exminster. The individual results were (Cornish names first): 1.Menadue 0-1 Rudd. 2.Hassall ½-½ Edgell. 3.Kneebone 0-1 Wong. 4.Bartlett 1-0 Hatchett. 5.Sellwood 0-1 Stuttard. 6.Nicholas 0-1 Kryyzanowski. 7.Healey 0-1 Footner. 8.Barkhuysen 0-1 Senior. 9.Trudeau ½-½ Purry. 10.Jenkins ½-½ Jepps. 11.Hill ½-½ Musson. 12.Long 1-0 Kilmister. 13.Lucas ½-½ Fewkes. Marjoram 0-1 Peters.

This miniature was one of the few bright spots for Devon in their recent match against Somerset.

White: Megan Owens (166). Black: Bill Ingham (164).

Old Indian Defence. [A55]

1.Nf3 d6 2.d4 c6 3.c4 Nf6 4.Nc3 Nbd7 5.e4 e5 White now neglects her piece development, indulging in some unforced pawn moves. 6.h3 Be7 7.b3 0–0 8.g3 exd4 9.Nxd4 d5 10.exd5 cxd5 11.Nc2 Still not developing new pieces.  Re8 12.Be3 Nb6 13.Be2 Bf5 14.c5 The stage is set for Black’s attack to begin. 14…Bxc2 15.Qxc2 d4 16.Rd1 Hoping to negate the fork. 16…Bxc5 17.Nb5 Bb4+ 18.Bd2 d3 19.Bxb4 If 19.Qb2 Rxe2+ 20.Kf1 Ne4 21.Qd4 Rxf2+ 22.Kg1 Bc5! 19…dxc2 20.Rxd8 c1Q+ 21.Rd1 Qc6! 0–1 The queen retreats to hit two more pieces, leaving White virtually a whole queen down.

In last week’s position, White mated with 1.Nb5! threatening 2.Nc7 mate and if the bishop takes it, there is 2.Qxb6 mate.

The 2011 British Solving Championship was held recently and finished in yet another triumph for John Nunn, who, as a result, now holds four major titles concurrently; World, European, British and International Solving Champion, a unique achievement. The 30 competitors had to try and solve 13 problems of increasing complexity, of which this is one of the three 2-movers – the easy ones at the start!

It was composed by the Revd. Gilbert Dodds in 1915 and first appeared in the American magazine, Good Companions. Black’s king cannot move, but how can White nail him in just two moves? A clue is that it revolves around the roles of the two queens.

White to Mate in 2.

Cornwall vs Gloucestershire (16.10.2010.)

While Devon II were playing Dorset at Luppit on Saturday (see previous blog report), Cornwall were playing Gloucestershire at Exminster and Ian George has kindly forwarded details. Cornwall is finding it increasingly difficult to get players to turn out for county matches in spite of the great  improvements recently made to the A30. The fact is that it’s 260 miles from Penzance to Gloucester, and 111 miles to Exeter, and one has to be very keen to undertake a 220 mile round trip for a single game. So this season, Cornwall have opted to field a slimmed-down team of 12 players instead of the usual 16. This match was played at Cornwall’s usual county match venue in Exminster, near Exeter.

The fact that the result was a 6-6 draw was mainly down to a stirling effort by the Cornish bottom 3 boards who scored 50% in spite of being heavily outgraded. Boards 1 – 9 were much more evenly matched and finished up all-square.

Bd

Cornwall

Grd

 

 

Gloucestershire

Grd

 1

J. Menadue

 185

 0

 1

   N. Hosken

185

 2

I. M. George

 184

 1

 0

  J. Jenkins

170

 3

L. Retallick

 181

 0

 1

  C. Mattos

170

 4

M. Hassall

 175

 ½

 ½

  P. J. Meade

164

 5

S. Bartlett

 162

 ½

 ½

  R. Dodwell

164

 6

M. Ferrie

 150

 ½

 ½

  G. Taylor

162

 7

C. Sellwood

 152

 ½

 ½

  A. Bentley

160

 8

G. Healey

 147

 ½

 ½

  D. Vaughan

159

 9

G. Trudeau

 143

 1

 0

  R. Craven

148

 10

C. Long

 122

 0

 1

  G. Brown

143

 11

P. Spargo

 111

 ½

 ½

  A. Richards

139

 12

D. Lucas

 108

 1

 0

  I. Blencowe

136

 

             Total

 

  6

  6