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Posts Tagged ‘chess’

Gold Coins Raining Down (16.05.2015.)

Cornwall’s venture into the National Stages of the Inter-County Championship ended at the first hurdle when they lost to Bedfordshire 5-11 at Weston-Super-Mare. They were outgraded on every board bar one, but not greatly so. In any case, they cannot but be delighted with their overall performance this season. Cornish names 1st in each pairing:- 1. Andrew Greet (229) 1–0 C. Ross (201). 2. Jeremy Menadue (190) ½-½ S. Ledger (195). 3. Theo Slade (178) ½-½ G. Kenworthy (190). 4. Mark Hassall (173) 0-1 A. Elwin (184). 5. Grant Healey (176) 0–1 P. Habershon (182). 6. David Saqui (170) 0-1 G. Borrowdale (181). 7. Robin Kneebone (173) 0-1 R. Freeman (178). 8. Simon Bartlett (168) 0-1 K. Williamson (177). 9. Lloyd Retallick (167) 1-0 M. Botteley (176). 10. Colin Sellwood (153) 0–1 S. Pike (176). 11. Gary Trudeau (157) 1-0 B. Valentine (166). 12. John Wilman (150) 0-1 N. Collacott (165). 13. Jeff Nicholas (150) ½-½ A. Matthews (160). 14. Richard Smith (147) ½-½ T. Lawson (154). 15. David R Jenkins (127) 0-1 C. Sollaway (140). 16. Richard Stephens U/G 0-1 B. Pike (92).

Referring back to their historic win against Devon in March and the game M. Shaw vs Wilman, given earlier, in which Black’s winning move was described by Jeremy Menadue as “what they used to call ‘a gold coins on the board moment’”. Where did that saying come from?

Apparently, it derives from the 1912 game S. Lewitzky vs Frank Marshall at Breslau. In his “autobiography”, ghosted by Reinfeld, Marshall introduces it thus:- “Perhaps you have heard about this game which so excited the spectators that they showered me with gold pieces! I have often been asked whether this really happened. The answer is – yes, that is what happened, literally”. Here is the game, shorn of most of his analysis.

White: S. Lewitzky. Black F. J. Marshall

1.d4 e6 2.e4 d5 3.Nc3 c5 4.Nf3 Nc6 5.exd5 exd5 6.Be2 Nf6 7.0–0 Be7 8.Bg5 0–0 9.dxc5 Be6 10.Nd4 Bxc5 11.Nxe6 fxe6 12.Bg4 Qd6 13.Bh3 Rae8 14.Qd2 Bb4 15.Bxf6 Rxf6 16.Rad1 Qc5 17.Qe2 Bxc3 18.bxc3 Qxc3 19.Rxd5 Nd4 20.Qh5 Ref8 21.Re5 Rh6 22.Qg5 Rxh3 23.Rc5 Qg3!! (see diagram)

Black's gold coin moment?

 

The gold coin moment. “The most elegant move I have ever played!” wrote Marshall.” The queen is offered 3 ways and White cannot accept the offer in any form. (a) If 24.hxg3 Ne2 mate. (b) If 24.fxg3 Ne2+ 25. Kh1 Rxf1 mate, and (c) if 24.Qxg3 Ne2+ 25.Kh1 Nxg3+ 26.Kg1 Nxf1 and Black will be a piece up”.

However, a number of authorities are unsure as to the truth of the story. Golombek, in his A History of Chess, casts doubt on it, as does Edward Winter in his Chess Notes. Did the citizens of Breslau in 1912 really have gold coins jangling in their pockets in case they felt a sudden urge to shower them on folk, however deserving? The Cornish certainly didn’t.

Dave Howard’s 2-mover last week was solved by 1.Ne4!

Frome Congress Approaches (09.05.2015.)

White: S. A. Whatley (182). Black: P. Byway (185).

Sicilian Defence – Sveshnikov Variation.  [B22]

1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 e6 The signature move of the Sveshnikov line, which is intended to produce lively chess. 3.g3 d5 4.exd5 exd5 5.d4 Nf6 6.Bg2 Be7 7.0–0 0–0 8.c3 Nc6 9.dxc5 Bxc5 10.Nbd2 h6 11.Nb3 Bb6 12.Bf4 Bg4 13.h3 Bh5 14.g4 Bg6 15.g5 This early aggression soon rebounds on him. 15…Nh5 16.Bc1 hxg5 17.Nxg5 Qf6 18.Qg4 Ne5 19.Qh4 Nd3 20.Bxd5 Rad8 21.Bf3 Nhf4 22.Bxf4 Nxf4 23.Qg4? Black now cleverly wins a piece, thanks to White’s weakening of his own king’s position. Better was 23.Bg2. 23…Qxg5! 24.Qxg5 Nxh3+ 25.Kg2 Nxg5 26.Bxb7 Having won a piece, Black will now be seeking to make equal exchanges whenever he can to increase the material differential. 26…Be4+ 27.Bxe4 Nxe4 28.Rh1 Nxf2 29.Rh4 Rd1 30.a4 Rfd8 31.a5 Rxa1 32.Nxa1 The bishop will be forced to abandon its protection of the knight, but Black still has enough to win. 32…Bxa5 33.Kxf2 Rd2+ 34.Ke3 Rxb2 35.Kd3 Rg2 36.Rh3 g5 37.Nb3 g4 38.Re3 Bb6 39.Re8+ Kg7 40.c4 Rg3+ 41.Kc2 Re3 42.Rc8 g3 43.c5 g2 44.cxb6 axb6 45.Nd4 g1Q Now it is White’s turn to administer a knight fork, but it’s too little, too late. 46.Nf5+ Kh7 47.Nxe3 Qxe3 48.Kb2 Qe5+ 0–1

The odds against either of them winning this year, or anyone else of that grade level, lengthened considerably after entries were received from the Lithuanian IM, Gediminas Sarakauskas (226) and Portuguese David Martins (212), with the possibility of other top players entering at the last minute, as they often do.

The popular IM, Colin Crouch, passed away recently at the age of 58 after a second brain haemorrhage. His first, a decade ago, had left him almost blind, but this had not prevented him from becoming a top class writer of chess books, coaching juniors and playing regularly on the congress circuit. His last book, Magnus Force – How Carlson beat Kasparov’s Record, was published by Everyman in 2013. He was a top junior in his day, winning the British U-16 title in 1972, subsequently adding the U-18 title.

Last week’s position ended much like the previous week’s but on the other side of the board, and, as before, all Black’s moves are forced – there is nothing better for him to play. Morphy (W) played 1.Nc5 discovered check; 1…Kb8. 2.Nd8+ Kc8 3.Nb6 double check. 3…Kb8. 4.Qc8+ and the rook must take, allowing 5.Nd7 mate. This sequence is also known as an epaulet mate, as in the final position the king has his two rooks apparently at his shoulder like a pair of military-style epaulets.

Reader Dave Howard of East Harptree has just sent in this new 2-mover.

White mates in 2 against any defence.

Plus ca Change… (02.05.2015.)

During the recent West of England Championship I celebrated my Golden Wedding and was able to reassemble the whole wedding party, bridesmaids, Best Man and ushers, which set me thinking on the lines of how some things have changed and some haven’t. The French have a phrase – “Plus ça change, plus c’est la même chose” – the more things change, the more they stay the same.

The same applies to the WECU Championship of half a century ago. It was held in Weymouth that year and attracted 94 players, divided into 10 smaller sections, including sections for ladies, girls, juniors, reserves A & B etc. Today, all entries are consolidated into just 3 sections, Open, Major and Minor, based on grade alone.

Many of those players involved at Weymouth have since moved on to the great chequerboard in the sky, of course, but a significant number are still very involved in the game, both as players and organisers. Trefor Thynne, Ivor Annetts, Brian Gosling, John Wheeler, Phil Meade and Leon Burnett, for example, all did well that year and have been very active in westcountry chess ever since. Scillonian David Ellis went on to become Champion the following year before emigrating to Perth, Australia, where he still conducts a chess column in his local paper. Burnett became Champion in 1966 and was still playing strongly in the recent Bristol Congress.

The winner of this game was awarded the Brigadier Morris Trophy for the best game by a junior in 1965. Today, David Shire is a noted problem composer – but what happened to the trophy is a mystery.

White: D. J. Shire. Black: B. G. Gosling. Sicilian Defence – Najdorf Variation.

1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 a6 6.Bg5 e6 7.f4 Be7 8.Qf3 Qc7 9.0–0–0 Nbd7 10.g4 Rb8 11.Bxf6 Nxf6 12.g5 Nd7 13.Rg1 b5 14.a3 b4 15.axb4 Rxb4 16.Bh3 Nc5 17.f5 All moves so far are identical to the Hindle-Gligoric game at the 1965 Hastings Christmas Congress; the boys really knew the latest opening theory. 17…Qb7 Attacks b2 and prevents e5. For example, Gligoric played 17…Bd7 18.e5! opening up attacking possibilities, and the game went on… 18…d5 19.fxe6 fxe6 20.Nxe6 Bxe6 21.Bxe6 Nxe6 22.Nxd5 and Hindle won, something of a sensation at the time. 18.f6 Bf8 19.b3 Rg8 20.Rde1 gxf6 21.Nd5! Threatening a knight fork on f6. 21…exd5 22.exd5+ And now White proceeds to wreak havoc. 22…Kd8 23.Qxf6+ Kc7 24.Qxf7+ Kb6 25.Qxg8 Bxh3 26.Qxf8 Qc7 27.Nc6! Threatening Re7 1–0.

Last week’s Morphy game ended with a combination that is well-known because of its ingenuity but one that rarely occurs in practice. 1.Qa3+ Kg8 (if Ke8 then Qe8 mate) 2.Ne7+ Kf8 3.Ng6+ Kg8 4.Qf8+ Rxf8 5.Ke7 mate, known as a smothered mate, as the king is hemmed in by its own pieces, in this case the rooks.

Having indicated how rare it is in actual play, here is another example, incredibly also by Morphy – in the same year. Just repeat the drill.

White to play and win in 5

Exmouth Add Div. 2 to Div. 1 title (25.04.2015.)

Exmouth hosted a Newton Abbot team, knowing that a win for either side would be enough to win the Mamhead Cup Devon’s Division 2, although Exmouth had the feint comfort that a 2-2 draw would give them the title. To this end, both captains had packed their teams with grading points up to the permitted maximum of 639. Both clubs had their top player on Bd. 1, but the difference then was that Newton Abbot had averaged their next 3 boards, while Exmouth had packed everything they had on to Bds. 2 & 3, and filling in an improving player on Bd. 4, in the hope that he might be able to extract something from his game. Team captain, Oliver Wensley, was unable to fit himself in the team, and was obliged to watch from the sidelines.  

This particular hope was not borne out as Blake’s opponent, the rapidly improving Vignesh Ramesh, whose latest rapidplay grade is actually 160+, won and Exmouth went 0-1 down, which put increasing pressure on the other 3. For some time, there seemed little between the sides in each game. Eventually, Mark Abbott, using the greater freedom that his pieces had, managed to conjure up a sharp winning attack, thereby levelling the score.

Bds 1 and 3 both went down to the final seconds of normal time and final minutes of extra time. Stephens was gradually being positionally stifled, as Mackle got a pawn to the 7th and his opponent had to commit a knight to h8 to block it. Eventually he had to concede as Mackle could pick up pawns at will. Shaw had gone a piece up, but Brooks found a lot of counterplay as his pieces were better unified. Shaw had to reconfigure and reorganise his army, which he managed. With c. 2 minutes left for each player he won a central pawn with a knight fork that swapped off queens and immediately after a bishop fork won a rook, and with it the game. 

A finish to the match that was as nerve-wracking for the spectators as the players. Thus Exmouth added the Mamhead Cup to the Bremridge Cup they had won a fortnight before.

The match details and resulting league table as follows:

  Mamhead Cup       Div. 2  25.04.15.  
  Exmouth Grd     Newton Abbot  
1 J. K. Stephens 194 0 1 D. Mackle 203
2 M. V. Abbott 173 1 0 M. Hui 150
3 M. Shaw 170 1 0 P. Brooks 154
4 S. Blake 102 0 1 V. Ramesh 132
  totals 639 2 2   639
  Mamhead Div. 2 1 2 3 4 5 + - pts
1 Exmouth X 1 2 2 2 11 5 7
2 Newton Abbot 1 X 1 1 2 10 6 5
3 Tiverton 0 1 X 2 2 9 7 5
4 Barnstaple 0 1 0 X ? 1
5 Teignmouth 0 0 0 ? X 0

The Exmouth team: seated (l-r) Meyrick Shaw & John Stephens. standing: Simon Blake & Oliver Wensley. (Mark Abbott arrived later).

Newton Abbot team: seated Paul Brooks & Dominic Mackle. Standing: Mark Hui & Vignesh Ramesh.

Bd. 1 & 2 get down to action - Stephens & Abbott.

Bds. 4 & 3 - Blake & Shaw.

Arkell Wins Bristol Spring Congress Open (25.04.2015.)

Keith Arkell followed up his recent success in the West of England Championship by winning the Bristol Spring Congress last weekend with a maximum 5/5 score; no surprise as he was by far the strongest player involved. In 2nd= place were Juraj Sokolsky (Slovakia), Chris Beaumont (Clifton), Steve Dilleigh (Horfield) and Richard Savory (Downend), all on 3½. Savory was awarded the British Championship Qualifying Place and on tie-break won the Bristol League Trophy for being the highest-placed player from the local league. Grading prizes: (U-176) 1st Theo Slade (Barnstaple). (U-160) 1st Kajetan Wandowicz (Horfield).  

Major: (U-155) 1st Max French (Frome). 2nd= Alan Papier (Clifton) & George Georgiou (Swindon). Grading prizes: (U-139) 1st Adrian Walker (Stroud). (U-125) 1st James Galloway. Papier became the Bristol League U-155 Champion.

Minor Section: (U-125) 1st= D. McGeeney (Cabot); G. Mill-Wilson (Yate); R. Ludlow (Trowbridge); A. Sage (Bath); R. Morris-Weston; D. Archer (Godalming); K. Langmaid (Yate) & A. Drummond (Cabot). Grading prizes: (U-108) 1st W. Grant (Frome). U-100: D. Woodruff (Keynsham). Junior prize: Harry Grieve (Guildford). Langmaid became the Bristol League U-125 Champion.

Here is a sharp finish from Rd. 4.

White: K. C. Arkell (234). Black: D. Pugh (184).

1.d4 Nf6 2.Nf3 c5 3.d5 e6 4.Nc3 a6 5.e4 d6 6.dxe6 Bxe6 7.Ng5 Nc6 8.Nxe6 fxe6 9.Bc4 Qd7 10.a4 0–0–0 An immediate invitation for White to attack on the queenside. 11.Bg5 Be7 12.a5 creating a possible outpost on b6 for his knight. 12…Kb8 Avoiding possible nasty knight checks. 13.0–0 h6 14.Bd2 g5 Black must be doing the same thing on the kingside, but those pawns have a long way to travel. 15.Na4 d5 16.exd5 exd5 17.Be2 Nd4 18.Bc3 Nxe2+ 19.Qxe2 Rhe8 20.Bxf6 Bxf6 21.Qf3 Bd4? 21…Be5 would have avoided material loss and got in a dig at White’s king e.g. 22.Nxc5 Qd6 23.Nd3 Bxh2+. 22.c3 g4 23.Qd3 Be5 24.Nxc5 Qd6 25.b4 Bxh2+ White is not worried by the check, in fact it gains a tempo. 26.Kh1 Be5 27.Rae1 h5 28.Re2 Re7 29.Rfe1 Qf6 30.Kg1 Bd6 Extra defence for the rook with the hope of removing that awkward knight, yet from this fairly even-looking position, the Grandmaster strikes like a cobra and suddenly it’s all over. 31.Rxe7 Bxe7 32.Re6 Qg5 33.Qg3+ Ka7 34.Rxa6+! 1–0 If 34…bxa6 35.Qc7+ Ka8 36.Qb7#.

The solution to last week’s 2-mover was

1.Ng3! If 1…Ke3 2.Bg1#; 1…Ke5 2.Qb2#

1…Nxe4 2.Nf5# or 1… any other knight move 2.Bg1#. The par solving time allowed for the experts was 7 minutes, so how did you compare?

The American, Paul Morphy (1837-1884), is considered one of the all-time chess geniuses. In this game he has neglected his piece development somewhat more than Black (Thomas Jefferson Bryan), yet still wins in 5 moves, even against the best defence.

Morphy (W) to play and win in 5.

National Success for Devon Club (18.04.2015.)

Devon had a club success at national level for the first time in a number of years last weekend when Newton Abbot won the Major Section of the newly-reformatted National Club Championships. Their Club Secretary, Trefor Thynne reports:-

Holiday Inn, Birmingham Airport, 11th -12th April 2015

A Newton Abbot Perspective:    

Newton Abbot Chess Club scored a notable success for Devon chess when they won, at their first attempt, the MAJOR Section (U-175 grade average)  at the revamped National Club Championships held in Birmingham over the weekend of  11th – 12th April. The Club’s 1st team was as surprised as anyone by the ease of their victory as they won all four of their matches and finished 3 points clear of the runners-up. Not only that, but the Club’s 2nd team did very well in coming 3rd out of 10 teams in the INTERMEDIATE Section (U-150 grade average).

The idea of entering teams for this event had come about when several of the club’s members decided to do something different from the usual run of local league competitions. The National Club Championships, formerly run like the FA Cup with a season-long knock-out campaign (although with the addition of a Plate competition for Rd. 1 losers) had somewhat lost its cachet with the expansion of the 4NCL, and in 2014 the ECF decided to reinvent the competition as a weekend congress at High Wycombe for club teams. Each team would consist of 4 players and would play 4 matches over the weekend. This year the event switched to the conveniently central location of Birmingham and attracted an increased entry into its 4 sections (Open, Major, Intermediate and Minor).

The Newton Abbot club (which incidentally celebrates its 10th birthday this year) entered two teams whose members were:

MAJOR:   Stephen Homer (184); John Fraser (175); Trefor Thynne (168); Matthew Wilson (157). (av. 171)

INTERMEDIATE: Andrew Kinder (146); Wilf Taylor (142); Vignesh Ramesh (138); Jacquie Barber-Lafon (121). (av. 136).

It was noteworthy that each of the two teams contained one of Devon’s best junior players: 17 yr- old John Fraser, already an England international, in the Major team and 14 yr -old Vignesh Ramesh in the Intermediate, both products of Torquay Boys’ Grammar School.

 MAJOR SECTION RESULTS:

Rd. 1:  Newton Abbot (171) 2½ – 1½ Wanstead and Woodford (173).

(Homer 1; Fraser ½; Wilson 0; Thynne 1)                                       

Rd. 2:  Newton Abbot 2½ – 1½ DHSS (167).

(Homer ½; Fraser 1; Wilson ½; Thynne ½)

Rd. 3: Newton Abbot 3 -1  GLCC (173).

(Homer 1; Fraser ½; Thynne ½; Wilson 1).

Rd. 4: Newton Abbot 2½ – 1½ Solihull  (169).

(Homer 0; Fraser 1; Thynne ½; Wilson 1).

Individual scores: Homer 2½ Fraser 3 Thynne 2½ Wilson 2½

TEAM PLACINGS:

1st Newton Abbot 8:   2nd Wanstead and Woodford 5:        3rd Drunken Knights                         

4th Solihull 3:              5th  DHSS 2:                                                   6th  GLCC 2.

INTERMEDIATE SECTION RESULTS:

Rd. 1:  Newton Abbot (136) 1-3  Leamington (125).

(Kinder 0; Taylor 0; Ramesh 0; Barber-Lafon 1).

Rd. 2: Newton Abbot  3 -1 Redditch  (135).

(Kinder 1; Taylor ½; Ramesh 1; Barber-Lafon ½).

Rd. 3:  Newton Abbot  2½ – 1½ Wanstead & Woodford  (144).

(Kinder ½; Taylor 1; Ramesh 0; Barber-Lafon 1)

Rd. 4: Newton Abbot 2 – 2 Sutton Coldfield (144).

(Kinder 0; Taylor 0; Ramesh 1; Barber-Lafon 1).

Individual scores: Kinder 1½; Taylor 1½;  Ramesh 2;  Barber-Lafon 3½).

TEAM PLACINGS:

1st Sutton Coldfield 7;                 2nd Braille Chess Association 6;        3rd Newton Abbot 5;                             4th Newport (Salop)  5;          5th Leamington 4;                              6th Warley Quinborne 4;          7th Redditch 4;                                          8th Wanstead & Woodford 2;             9th Wolverhampton 2;            10th  GLCC 1:

The pleasing thing about the performance of the Newton Abbot 1st team was the consistency over all 4 boards with no weak link. Each player scored vital wins in closely-fought matches. Considering that the majority of previous winners of this event have come from the powerful south-east of England, this victory is a notable triumph for Westcountry chess (one leading ECF officer present actually asked me after the prize-giving “Where exactly is Newton Abbot? “ I was pleased to reassure him that yes, good chess was played in the far south-west and no, we did not have straw sticking out of our ears!

The club’s second team also exceeded expectations since they had the 3rd lowest average grade of the 10 teams. All four team members contributed wins at vital moments but the outstanding score (3 ½) was that of Devon and West of England Ladies’ Champion on Bd 4, Jacquie Barber-Lafon.

To conclude, the experiment of entering this new-style event can be called a resounding success and it perhaps paves the way for other Devon clubs in the future. Certainly the format was much appreciated by all teams who competed in an enjoyable atmosphere of friendly rivalry. Accommodation (discounted rates on offer for chess players) in the Holiday Inn was excellent, as were the playing conditions in the hotel.

Newton Abbot Chess Club members look forward to defending their title in 2016. Let us hope to see other Devon clubs also take up the challenge of competing on the national stage.

Trefor Thynne.

NB: Wilson finished early and left for home, thereby missing the team’s photo opportunity, but the organisers insisted on 4 players being present, so Andrew Kinder appears in both teams below.

1st Team: (l-r) Alex Holowczak (organiser); Thynne; Homer; Fraser & Kinder.

2nd Team: (l-r) Ramesh; Taylor; Kinder & Barber-Lafon.

Exmouth Retain Bremridge Cup – Div. 1 (11.04.2015.)

After wins against Newton Abbot and Tiverton, and a streaky draw against Exeter, Exmouth went into their last match knowing that even a narrow loss would leave them 1st= on match points, while even a draw would make them champions again. As the teams assembled at Teignmouth’s venue, the Alice Cross Day Centre, there was nervous banter between the players, with some mention of the possible odds on a 6-0 win for Exmouth, but this was only gallows humour from some of the home team; Exmouth were taking nothing for granted.

The only presumption was to be taking a team photograph with the cup, but this was only because it was probably the only time the team would all be present in the same place at the same time.  Naturally, it wouldn’t be used if Exmouth lost the match. To keep things even-handed, a team photo was taken of the Teignmouth team as well. (see below).

As the match got under way, a win seemed some way off, as Ingham & Underwood played a quick draw and went off to do other things, while Wensley, otherwise the in-form player, went a piece down against the dangerous Bramley, and there were no discernable advantages to Exmouth in the other 4 games – at that point. Nor could Gosling make any headway against Prior and a draw was agreed. So where was a won game, let alone a won match coming from? However, after 3+ hours play, games 3 to 5 all went the visitors’ way in rapid succession, as grades and experience told in the long run. Wensley recovered his piece and won with Q+R on the 7th rank. Martin was able to pick up pawns in the endgame and broke through, while Scott forced a series of errors from his opponent. With the match won, it left Stephens and Brusey playing for pride, neither willing to concede anything. They played an endgame right through to the last minutes of extra time, until Brusey’s flag fell in a losing position, while Stephens had about 3 minutes left. 

A 5-1 result was about what one might expect, looking at the team sheets, but it was mighty hard work getting there.

  Bremridge Cup       11.04.2015  
  Teignmouth Grd     Exmouth Grd
1 Alan W. Brusey 176 0 1 John K. Stephens 196
2 H. Bill Ingham 168 ½ ½ Jon Underwood 180
3 Norman F. Tidy 127 0 1 Steve Martin 175
4 Graham Bramley 117 0 1 Oliver E. Wensley  151
5 John Ariss 117 0 1 Chris J. Scott 154
6 Mike T.  Prior 116 ½ ½ Brian G. Gosling 148
    821       1,004
      1 5    

The final table was as follows:-

  Bremridge Cup Div. 1: 2015     Game points  
  Team 1 2 3 4 5 for against pts
1 Exmouth X 2 2 1 2 16½ 7
2 Newton Abbot 0 X 1 2 2 15 9 5
3 Tiverton 0 1 X 2 2 13 11 5
4 Exeter 1 0 0 X 2 10½ 13½ 3
5 Teignmouth 0 0 0 0 X 5 19 0

 

    NA Tiv Ex Te    
  ▼players.  Rd ► 1 2 3 4    
1 Stephens 0 1 1 1   3
2 Underwood ½ ½ 0 ½  
3 Martin 1 1   2
4 Scott 1 1 0 1   3
5 Gosling ½ 1 0 ½   2
6 Wensley ½ 1 1 1  
7 Shaw ½ 1  
    5 3 5   16½ 

 

The Teignmouth team: seated l-r:- Bill Ingham; Alan Brusey, Norman Tidy (Capt.). Standing: John Ariss; Graham Bramley & M. Prior.

The Exmouth team: seated l-r: Jonathan Underwood; John Stephens & Oliver Wensley. Standing: Chris Scott, Brian Gosling & Steve Martin.

General view; Ingham - Underwood nearest.

General view #2: Prior - Gosling nearest.

Bramley & Wensley in some post-game analysis.

WECU Championship & Congress 2015 – Results.

The West of England Championship and Congress took place over the Easter weekend at its usual venue of the Royal Beacon Hotel, Exmouth. The final prize list held few major surprises, though the games were well-contested. The winners were as follows (all scores out of 7).

Open: 1st Keith Arkell (234) Paignton 6½.

2nd Jack Rudd (221) Barnstaple 5½.

3rd= Richard McMichael  (221)                      Kings Head          & Theo Slade (178) Barnstaple both 4½. Grading prizes – U-187:                            

1st Richard Savory (179)          Downend 4. U-1994: 1st= Alan Brusey –Teignmouth; Meyrick Shaw Exmouth & Graham Bolt Railways. Theo Slade accepted the British Championship Qualifying Place.

Major Section (U-175): 1st= Oliver Wensley (151) Exmouth & Colin Sellwood (153) Camborne both 5½. 3rd= Ray Gamble (160) Derby; Mark Potter (154); Tony Packham (169) GLCC; Matthew Wilson (157) Newton Abbot; Max French (154) Frome                   & Jamie Morgan (149) Penwith. Grading Prizes: (U-158); Tim Woodward (150) Trowbridge. (U-148): John Nyman (147) King’s Head.

Minor Section (U-140): 1st Chris Snook-Lumb        (129) Swindon. 2nd Nigel Dicker.                            127   Glastonbury  

3rd= Barry Sandercock (133) & Duncan Cooper (119). GP (U-130) Tim Crouch (129) King’s Head; R. Hunt (129); Paul Foster (127) Medway & Peter Dimond (123) Bath.  (U-123): Terry Greenaway (118) Torquay. (U-110): John Harris(109) Stroud; Hazel Welch (105) Seaton & Martyn Maber (100) Taunton.

This was the 14 yr old Theo Slade’s Rd. 2 game against the seasoned Grandmaster, the bottom-rated player against the top.

White: T. L. Slade. Black: K. C. Arkell.

Caro-Kann Defence [B17].

1.e4 c6 2.d4 d5 3.Nd2 dxe4 4.Nxe4 Nd7 5.Ng5 Ngf6 6.Bd3 Nb6 7.N1f3 Bg4 8.Qe2 Bh5 9.h3 h6 10.g4 hxg5 11.gxh5 Rxh5 12.Nxg5 Qxd4 13.Ne6 Qd6 If 13…fxe6 14.Bg6+ disturbing the king and winning a rook, which looks a horror show for Black but after  14…Kd8 15.Bxh5 Nxh5 16.Be3 Qb4+ 17.c3 Qb5 18.Bxb6+ axb6 19.0–0–0+ Kc7 20.Qxe6  and Black has 2 minor pieces for a rook, often an advantage, depending on where the pieces in question are situated. This game is a good example of that. 14.Bf4 Qxe6 15.Qxe6 fxe6 16.Bg6+ Kd7 17.Bxh5 Nxh5 18.0–0–0+ Ke8 19.Be5 g6 20.Rhg1 Kf7 21.Rd4 Now Black’s pieces spring into action. 21…Bh6+ 22.Kd1 Nf6 23.c4 Nbd7 24.Bxf6 Nxf6 25.Re1 Rh8 26.Kc2 Bg7 27.Rd3 Rh4 28.b3 Rf4 29.Re2 Ne4 30.Rd7 Nc5 31.Rd1 a5 32.Rh1 Bd4 33.Rh2 g5 34.Rg2 Bf6 35.Rg4 Rf5 36.a3 e5 37.b4 axb4 38.axb4 Ne6 Threatening Nd4+. 39.Kc1 Nf4 40.Ra2 b5 41.cxb5 cxb5 The knight is ready to mop up White’s pawns via d3 or h3. 0–1

Last week’s game ended 1.Nxd6! attacking the rook, and if 1…PxN White can swap off all the kingside pieces and his b-pawn romps home to queen.

Keith Arkell played faultlessly at Exmouth, but even GMs can overlook things at times, and in this recent position he missed Black’s best move. Can you improve on 1…Be6?

Black to play and win more quickly than he actually did.

West of England Championship & Congress – Day 2

 The results of the morning games, with its 5 draws,  led to a certain bunching up of scores, behind the sole leader, Keith Arkell. In the last game to finish, Slade pushed Mackle to the limit, but with only a few minutes of extra time left, a draw was agreed, with Slade having the only piece on the board. The withdrawal of Fallowfield jr. meant that a bye was created and this fell to Maurice Staples. He got the full point, but had a meaningful game against a player with a bye  in the Minor. By chance (no pun intended), this happened to be Hazel Welch, which meant that a former WECU Champion was playing a former WECU Ladies Champion, and that doesn’t happen often.

  Open – Rd. 3            
1 Arkell, Keith CC 2493 (2) ½ – ½ Rudd, Jack 2251 (1½)
2 Smith, Andrew P 2132 (1½) ½ – ½ Menadue, Jeremy FS 2043 (1½)
3 Shaw, Meyrick 1980 (1½) ½ – ½ Bolt, Graham 1989 (1)
4 Mackle, Dominic 2248 (1) ½ – ½ Slade, Theo 1962 (1)
5 Bartlett, Simon 1961 (1) 0 – 1 McMichael, Richard J 2176 (1)
6 Brusey, Alan W 1991 (1) ½ – ½ Dilleigh, Stephen P 2106 (1)
7 Bass, John W 2013 (1) 0 – 1 Thompson, Robert 1995 (½)
8 Littlejohns, David P 1983 (½) 1 – 0 Savory, Richard J 2100 (½)
9 Staples, Maurice J 2006 (½) 1 –      

The afternoon saw 5 wins, with the 3 titled players starting to edge ahead, while Brusey and Bolt continued their good run of form.

  Open Rd. 4              
1 Menadue, Jeremy FS 2043 (2) 0 – 1 Arkell, Keith C 2493 (2½) 1
2 Rudd, Jack 2251 (2) 1 – 0 Shaw, Meyrick 1980 (2) 17
3 Staples, Maurice J 2006 (1½) 0 – 1 Smith, Andrew P 2132 (2) 5
4 Dilleigh, Stephen P 2106 (1½) ½ – ½ Mackle, Dominic 2248 (1½) 3
5 McMichael, Richard J 2176 (2) 1 – 0 Littlejohns, David P 1983 (1½) 15
6 Thompson, Robert 1995 (1½) 0 – 1 Brusey, Alan W 1991 (1½) 13
7 Bolt, Graham 1989 (1½) 1 – 0 Bartlett, Simon 1961 (1) 19
8 Savory, Richard J 2100 (½) ½ – ½ Bass, John W 2013 (1) 10
9 Slade, Theo 1962 (1½) 1 –        

Teignmouth RapidPlay 2015 Results

The prizewinners in the 34th Teignmouth Rapidplay Congress, played on Saturday 28th March,  were as follows:

  Open Grd Club Pts
1st Patryk Krzyzanowski 197 Yeovil 5
2nd= Jonathan Underwood 196 Seaton/Exmouth
  Steve Homer 194 Newton Abbot
GP (A) Meyrick Shaw 164 Exmouth 4
GP (B) Rob Wilby 142 Plymouth 3
  Steve Pollyn 143 Wimborne 3
U-14 Vignesh Ramish 161 Newton Abbot 3
  Graded Section      
1st= Paul Brackner 121 Bridport 5
  Duncan Macarthur 134 Keynsham 5
  Chris McKinley 123 Sedgemoor 5
GP (A) Kelvin Hunter 120 Tiverton  
GP (B) Gary Behan   99 Plymouth
U-14 Nandaja Narayanan   94 Newton Abbot 3
  Macey Rickard 103 Teignmouth 3
         

The cross tables, generated by Tournament Director, are here:-

NB    Index:
A = Player’s score
B = Number of graded games played
C = Total grading points
D = Performance Grade

Pos Name Grade 1 2 3 4 5 6 A B C D
1 Krzyzanowski, Patryk 197C b6+ w5+ b10+ w4= w8= b2+ 5 6 1230 205
2 Homer, Stephen J 194C b21+ w20= b3+ w9+ b4+ w1- 6 1220 203
3 Underwood, Jonathan 196F w13+ b9= w2- b7+ w5+ b8+ 6 1175 196
4 Piper, Stephen J 185C w18+ b16+ w8+ b1= w2- b9= 4 6 1116 186
5 Shaw, Meyrick 164A w14+ b1- w11+ w17+ b3- w13+ 4 6 1146 191
6 Bartlett, Simon 156A w1- b18= w16+ b11+ b9= w10= 6 1065 178
7 Body, Giles 166A b8- w22= b12+ w3- b20+ w17+ 6 985 164
8 Lingham, Richard H 0 w7+ w17+ b4- w10+ b1= w3- 6 290 48
9 Richardt, Mike 184B b19+ w3= b20+ b2- w6= w4= 6 1071 179
10 Rossiter, Alex 173C w12+ b15+ w1- b8- w14+ b6= 6 995 166
11 Jaszkiwskyj, Peter 169B b16- w19+ b5- w6- b21+ w20+ 3 6 906 151
12 Pollyn, Stephen M 143F b10- b13= w7- w21+ b18+ w15= 3 6 979 163
13 Ramesh, Vignesh 161A b3- w12= b22+ w20= b17+ b5- 3 6 973 162
14 Wilby, Robert G 142A b5- w21+ b17- w19+ b10- w16+ 3 6 959 160
15 Fraser, John 174C b20- w10- b19= w22+ b16= b12= 6 842 140
16 Bowley, John R 142C w11+ w4- b6- b18= w15= b14- 2 6 874 146
17 Brusey, Alan W 181A w22+ b8- w14+ b5- w13- b7- 2 6 818 136
18 Dean, Steve K 151B b4- w6= b21= w16= w12- b19= 2 6 825 138
19 Keen, Charles E 145A w9- b11- w15= b14- b22+ w18= 2 6 864 144
20 Senior, Neville N 145C w15+ b2= w9- b13= w7- b11- 2 6 939 157
21 Annetts, Ivor S 154A w2- b14- w18= b12- w11- b22+ 6 793 132
22 Quinn, Martin 144D b17- b7= w13- b15- w19- w21- ½ 6 731 122

 

  Name Grade 1 2 3 4 5 6 A B C D
1 Brackner, Paul 121 w14= b16+ w13+ b17= w19+ b8+ 5 6 823 137
2 Macarthur, Duncan M 134 b11+ w28+ b8+ w4+ b5+ w3- 5 6 902 150
3 McKinley, Chris TJ 123 w20+ b13= w18= b7+ w17+ b2+ 5 6 864 144
4 Derrick, Neil D 137 w10+ b26+ w5= b2- w13+ b15+ 6 845 141
5 Hunter, Kelvin 120 b24+ w27+ b4= w6+ w2- b9+ 6 864 144
6 Wilson, Matthew R 134 w13- b24+ w16+ b5- w26+ b17+ 4 6 731 122
7 Alexander, Ken RD 128 b27- w22+ b10+ w3- b11= w20+ 6 687 115
8 Behan, Gary 99 w12+ b19+ w2- b18+ b9= w1- 6 775 129
9 Dicker, Nigel 122 w18- b20+ w26+ b15+ w8= w5- 6 696 116
10 George, John Michael 110 b4- w23+ w7- b30+ w12= b19+ 6 706 118
11 Jones, Sidney A 112 w2- b25= w30= b24+ w7= b16+ 6 655 109
12 Kelly, Edmund 123 b8- w29+ b28= w14= b10= w27+ 6 647 108
13 Maber, Martyn J 106 b6+ w3= b1- w21+ b4- w22+ 6 754 126
14 Blackmore, Joshua P 89 b1= b15= w19= b12= w16- b26+ 3 6 704 117
15 Doidge, Charles 121 b17= w14= b27+ w9- b18+ w4- 3 6 650 108
16 Dowse, Alan 113 bye+ w1- b6- w27+ b14+ w11- 3 5 511 102
17 Narayanan, Nandaja 94 w15= b30+ b21+ w1= b3- w6- 3 6 691 115
18 Rickard, Macey J 103 b9+ w21= b3= w8- w15- b25+ 3 6 644 107
19 McGeeney, David B 122 b22+ w8- b14= w28+ b1- w10- 6 562 94
20 Thorpe-Tracey, Stephen F 99 b3- w9- b23+ w25= b21+ b7- 6 557 93
21 Waters, Roger G 116 w29+ b18= w17- b13- w20- b24+ 6 510 85
22 Darlow, Paul 73 w19- b7- w25+ b26- w23+ b13- 2 6 402 67
23 Dyer, Jack 0 w26- b10- w20- b29+ b22- w28+ 2 6 138 23
24 Haines, Matthew A 82 w5- w6- b29+ w11- b28+ w21- 2 6 523 87
25 Hay, Curtis J 0 b28- w11= b22- b20= w29+ w18- 2 6 138 23
26 Hussey, Michael 104 b23+ w4- b9- w22+ b6- w14- 2 6 519 87
27 Mackie, Norman 105 w7+ b5- w15- b16- w30+ b12- 2 6 581 97
28 Welch, Hazel 111 w25+ b2- w12= b19- w24- b23- 6 453 76
29 Pollyn, William D 38 b21- b12- w24- w23- b25- b30+ 1 6 110 18
30 Webster, Alan F 76 b31= w17- b11= w10- b27- w29- 1 6 375 63
31 Tatam, Anthony 119A w30=           ½ 1 79 79