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British Championship Prizewinners

There were a number of outstanding achievements by Westcountry players at the recent British Championships in Torquay. Grandmaster Keith Arkell of Paignton set a world record for the number of games completed in 1 hour. This was 37, all against Gary Lane, a Paigntonian by birth. Arkell also won the prize for the greatest number of points scored in all tournaments. He was greatly helped in this quest by having notched up 22 wins in the above bullet chess challenge before anyone else had started, as it was the opening event.

Alex ter Hark of Bristol became British U-120 Champion, while Torquay schoolboy, John Fraser, did well enough to gain automatic qualification for next year’s British Championship in Aberystwyth.

Another local player, Dom Mackle of Newton Abbot, won a grading prize in the main championship for his excellent score of 6/11 points. In this game from Round 5 he plays former Commonwealth and Australian Champion, Gary Lane. 

White: G. W. Lane (2401). Black: D. Mackle (2216).

Notes based on those by the winner.

French Defence – Tarrasch Var. [C04]

1.e4 e6 2.d4 d5 3.Nd2 Nc6 4.Ngf3 Nf6 5.e5 Nd7 6.Be2 Be7 7.Nf1 0–0 8.Ne3 Black needs to challenge the pawn on e5 or else his q-side pieces risk becoming trapped. 8…f6 9.exf6 Nxf6 10.0–0 Bd6 11.c4 b6 12.b3 Bb7 13.Bb2 Bf4 14.Rc1 Ne4 15.a3 Ne7 16.Rc2 Bxe3 17.fxe3 Nf5 18.Bc1 dxc4 19.Bxc4 Bd5 20.Ne5 Qg5 21.Qg4 Qxg4 Black had toyed with the speculative queen sacrifice 21…Nxe3 22.Qxg5 Bxc4 but the problem was that after 23.Re1 Nxg5 and the more or less forced sequence 24.Bxe3 Bxb3 25.Rc3 Black simply ends up a piece down. 22.Nxg4 c5 23.dxc5 bxc5 24.Rf4 Nfd6 25.Ne5 g5 26.Rxf8+ Rxf8 27.Bb2 Bxc4 28.Nxc4 Nf5 29.g3 However, as played, his active knights and freer rook make the endgame easier to play for Black.  29…Rb8 30.Kg2 Rxb3 31.Kf3 Ned6 32.Nxd6 Nxd6 33.Be5 Nf5 34.Rxc5 Nxe3 35.Ke4 Rxa3 36.Rc8+ Kf7 37.Rc7+ Kg6 38.Rg7+ Kh6 39.Re7 Ng4 40.Bd4 e5 41.Bxa7 Nxh2 42.Bf2 Ng4 43.Be1 Kg6 44.Re6+ Kh5 45.Bb4 Rxg3 46.Ra6 Re3+ 47.Kf5 Rf3+ 0–1. If 48.Ke6 Rf6+ wins the rook or 48.Ke4 Rf4+ wins the bishop.

In last week’s position, White won by 1.h6 g7xh6 He must take or be taken, then 2.f6 and White queens in 2.

This 2-mover was one of 6 used in an evening problem-solving competition at the British Championships in Torquay, won by Giles Body of Lympstone.

pieces risk becoming trapped. 8…f6 9.exf6 Nxf6 10.0–0 Bd6 11.c4 b6 12.b3 Bb7 13.Bb2 Bf4 14.Rc1 Ne4 15.a3 Ne7 16.Rc2 Bxe3 17.fxe3 Nf5 18.Bc1 dxc4 19.Bxc4 Bd5 20.Ne5 Qg5 21.Qg4 Qxg4 Black had toyed with the speculative queen sacrifice 21…Nxe3 22.Qxg5 Bxc4 but the problem was that after 23.Re1 Nxg5 and the more or less forced sequence 24.Bxe3 Bxb3 25.Rc3 Black simply ends up a piece down. 22.Nxg4 c5 23.dxc5 bxc5 24.Rf4 Nfd6 25.Ne5 g5 26.Rxf8+ Rxf8 27.Bb2 Bxc4 28.Nxc4 Nf5 29.g3 However, as played, his active knights and freer rook make the endgame easier to play for Black.  29…Rb8 30.Kg2 Rxb3 31.Kf3 Ned6 32.Nxd6 Nxd6 33.Be5 Nf5 34.Rxc5 Nxe3 35.Ke4 Rxa3 36.Rc8+ Kf7 37.Rc7+ Kg6 38.Rg7+ Kh6 39.Re7 Ng4 40.Bd4 e5 41.Bxa7 Nxh2 42.Bf2 Ng4 43.Be1 Kg6 44.Re6+ Kh5 45.Bb4 Rxg3 46.Ra6 Re3+ 47.Kf5 Rf3+ 0–1. If 48.Ke6 Rf6+ wins the rook or 48.Ke4 Rf4+ wins the bishop.

In last week’s position, White won by 1.h6 g7xh6 He must take or be taken, then 2.f6 and White queens in 2.

This 2-mover was one of 6 used in an evening problem-solving competition at the British Championships in Torquay, won by Giles Body of Lympstone.

White to play and mate in 2