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London Chess Classic 2015

Many of the World’s top players have been gathering in the capital this week for the London Chess Classic, the strongest tournament ever held in the UK, which started yesterday at Olympia and will run until next Sunday.

The 10 players forming the top section, with their nationality and world rankings,   are Magnus Carlsen (Norway – World Champion); Veselin Topolov (Bulgaria – no. 2); Vishy Anand (India – no. 3); Hikaru Nakamura (USA – no. 5); Fabio Caruana (USA – no. 6); Lev Aronian (Armenia – no. 7); Anish Giri (Holland – no. 9); Maxime Vachier-Lagrave (France – no. 12); Alexander Grischuk (Russia – no. 14) & Michael Adams (no. 18).

Today’s Rd. 2 pairings are:- 1. Giri vs Adams. 2. Aronian vs Anand. 3. Carlsen vs Caruana. 4. Nakamura vs Vachier-Lagrave & 5.Topalov vs Grischuk. The games may be watched live on the event website. Interestingly, the football league system of awarding 3 points for a win and 1 for a draw is used, to reduce the risk of short, dull, grandmaster draws, and increase the likelihood of spirited fighting chess.

Among the many other sections available to players of more modest talents is a new knockout tournament involving 8 of Britain’s top players, in which England’s 2nd, 3rd, 4th, & 6th grades, David Howell, Luke McShane, Nigel Short and Gawain Jones are joined by the 2 most promising juniors, Yang-Fan Zhou and Daniel Fernandez plus Scottish No. 1 Jonathan Rowson.

Visitors will also be able to play them as several, including Nunn, Speelman and McShane will be taking on 20 at a time – simultaneously.

This game came from the London Classic Knock-Out 2 years ago.

White: Michael Adams (2754). Black: Peter Svidler (2758)

Sicilian Defence – Sveshnikov Variation. [B90]

1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 a6 6.Be3 e5 The signature move of the Sveshnikov, in which Black accepts a weakening of his d-pawn and a weak d5 square, in return for buying time to develop his pieces.  7.Nf3 Qc7 8.a4 Be6 9.Be2 h6 10.0–0 Nbd7 11.h3 Be7 12.Nh2 0–0 13.Ng4 Qc6 14.Qd3 Rfc8 15.Rfd1 Rab8 16.a5 Nc5 The power of the check comes into play. 17.Nxf6+ Bxf6 allowing his already weakened d-pawn to fall. If 17…gxf6 18.Bxc5 Qxc5. 18.Qxd6 Qxd6 19.Rxd6 Be7 20.Rd2 Bg5 21.Bxg5 hxg5 22.Bg4 b5 23.axb6 Rxb6 24.Nd5 Threatening Ne7+ winning a rook. 24…Rb7 25.f3 Rcb8 26.b4 1–0 After 26…Bxd5 27.Rxd5 Ne6 28.Bxe6 fxe6 and Black’s doubled pawns can be picked off at leisure.

Last week’s position was ended by 1.RxP+! with the threat of 2.Ne6+ forking king & queen.

Last year’s winner of the London Chess Classic was former World Champion, Vishy Anand. This position from a game in 1987, however, was not one of his finest moments. White to play and administer a knock-out blow.

White to play and demolish Anand.

What’s So Royal About the Royal Beacon?

The Royal Beacon Hotel – How Come

 

Since the millennium, the Royal Beacon Hotel, Exmouth has become one of the best-appointed and popular venues for small to medium chess events. It also has an interesting background: so, what’s so “Royal” about the Royal Beacon? 

First of all, the Beacon. The hotel is situated on the highest point of the old cliff-top nearest the town centre, the site of the original beacon, which probably dated back to Elizabethan times. At that time, with the constant fear of invasion by Spanish Catholic forces, the whole of the English south coast was linked by a series of beacons on every prominence, each visible to those adjacent when lit. In this way, news of an approaching Armada could travel from Land’s End to London in a matter of hours – the nearest thing the Tudors had to e-mail. The cliff-top would have been kept well clear of the kind of scrubby bushes and trees that so annoyingly obscure the sea view today, so the beacon-keepers at Exmouth were in visible contact with Berry Head, near Brixham, and as soon as that was seen to be alight, Exmouth would spring into action, relaying the danger message eastward along the coast.  The original beacon has long since gone, of course, but a modern structure, symbolic of the original, still stands outside the Hotel’s front door. (see left)

The hotel’s origins can be traced to the French Revolution of 1789, which, after the guillotining and general Terror died down, was hijacked by the Corsican corporal, Napoleon Bonaparte, who for the next 20 years stomped up and down Western Europe with his armies, from Madrid to Moscow, fomenting further revolutions and was viewed at the time as being at best a bit of a pest, and at worst a dangerous megalomaniac. 

These troubles made it too dangerous for the British aristocracy to take their traditional Grand Tour, during which they would tour the Continent in general and Italy in particular, drinking in the culture of warmer climes. Now they had to make the best of things and make do with the English seaside – a novel idea at the time. This saw small towns like Sidmouth and Exmouth rise from fishing villages to become fashionable resorts for the moderately wealthy. Young Victoria herself had a place in Sidmouth, while Exmouth’s Beacon area became filled with fine Regency houses and hotels. Lady Nelson and Lady Byron lived there, and in 1810, with the Battle of Waterloo still 5 years away, the hotel was built, and named the Marine Hotel. 

And what of the royal connection, and how “royal” is it?  This is another fascinating story, woven into the mainstream of European history. At the recent 15th Seniors’ Chess Congress held there in November 2015, one of the players, Roger Scowen, ever the scholar, put me on to the story of how it all came about. 

Germany in the early 19th century consisted of a patchwork of small kingdoms, dukedoms, electorates, states etc. each with its own hierarchy of aristocrats. The Kingdom of Saxony (1806 – 1918), as it emerged from the post-Napoleonic upheavals, was centred around Dresden and Leipzig in the east of modern day Germany. 

In June 1836 Frederick Augustus II became King of Saxony. He was intelligent, liberal, popular with his people, and keen to learn about the natural world. To this end, in 1844 he organised an informal tour of the UK accompanied only by his personal physician, Carl Gustav Carus. After paying his respects to Victoria and Albert at Windsor he set off with Carus along the south coast, noting among other things, interesting flora and fauna, human activities, geological formations etc. 

Carus himself was a true polymath, being a doctor both of medicine and philosophy, scientist, artist, naturalist, psychologist and goodness knows what else besides. En route, he made regular notes about anything that interested either man, which were later written up into a book entitled The King of Saxony’s Journey Through England and Scotland. 

After purchasing a large ichthyosaur skeleton from Mary Anning herself in Lyme Regis, the pair proceeded westward. This is the relevant extract from pp 200 & 202 of the journal. 

Exmouth: July 1st  Evening. 

……. ‘At the top, the road passes through a deep cutting, and, after a short drive, we arrived at this place, which takes its name from its situation at the place where the river Ex empties itself into the channel. Exmouth is also very much visited by those who wish to enjoy the benefits of sea air and bathing. In my “Road Book of England”, Exmouth is said to be “the oldest and best frequented watering place in Devon;” and the height on which our small hotel (The Marine Hotel) is situated, it can clearly be perceived that the wide bay, with its numerous and boldly projecting promontories, must be a place in which ships can lie in perfect safety, sheltered from every storm. We went down to the shore and found it covered with the finest sand, in which here and there were specimens of the violet convolvulus (Convolvulus Soldanella), and the blue flowering Eryngium maritimum, and multitudes of shells of various colours. The evening had become gloomy, but calm and warm; merchant vessels at anchor were scattered about in the bay; small fishing-boats were cleaving the glassy waters, enclosed by the beautiful projecting headlands; whilst two ships, with their full-set sails flapping loose and scarcely able to catch a breath of wind, were being towed out to sea by a fishing-boat. The whole scene was charming; and when we remembered the noon-tide heat, the cool air proved doubly delightful and refreshing. 

Next morning: 

Exmouth bay penetrates deeply into the land, so that it would have added greatly to the distance to have travelled round; the carriages were, therefore, early in the morning put on board boats and thus conveyed across the water to a sandy promontory on the opposite side (Dawlish Warren) from which they were drawn by horses, sent for the purpose, to the high road on the further side. We, ourselves, passed the bay in a small row-boat, enjoying the delightful morning air and glorious sunlight reflected in all directions from the clear waves”………. 

And that’s it. One evening in Exmouth is all it took to establish that royal connection. Actually, the pair were travelling incognito, as they didn’t want a lot of fuss and fanfare to impede their progress, and the hotel staff may not have known at the time exactly who these bed & breakfast guests were, but word must have got out at some point. When it got back to the Proprietor, he wasn’t slow to spot an opportunity, and changed the name from the Marine to the Royal Beacon Hotel, and that’s how it’s been for the past 170 years. 

What happened to our pair of Saxons? Exactly 10 years after his Exmouth escapade, he was making a trip through the Tyrol and fell beneath the hooves of a horse that stepped on his head, and being childless was succeeded to the throne by his younger brother, Johann. 

Carus died in 1869 aged 80, and his work influenced, among others, Charles Darwin’s evolutionary theories and Carl Jung’s theories on the role of the unconscious in the psyche. In 2015, his grave in Dresden is currently due for removal due to non-payment of fees.

Roger Scowan with a problem

Carl Gustav Carus - Polymath.

King Frederick Augustus II of Saxony

Devon Successes at World Seniors’ Championships (28.11.2015.)

Acqui Terme, midway between Genoa and Turin, is said to be one of the prettiest towns in Italy, and for most of November has been hosting the World Seniors Chess Championships. The bulk of the English entry in the one hundred strong 50–65 yrs section, was made up of three adopted Devonians; Keith Arkell (Paignton), who came 1st= last year, Meyrick Shaw (Exmouth) and Brian Hewson (Tiverton). This time, however, Arkell (4th seed) couldn’t quite maintain his previous form and finished 12th= on 7/11 points, and not very far behind him were Shaw (60th seed) 30th= on 6 pts and Hewson (53rd seed), 45th= on 5½, which made Shaw’s the stand-out performance. In Rd. 1 he was paired against a Grandmaster.

White: M. Shaw (2020). Black: GM Jens  Kristianson (2420).

1.d4 Nf6 2.Nf3 e6 3.Bf4 b6 4.Nbd2 Bb7 5.c3 Be7 6.Qc2 c5 7.e4 cxd4 8.Nxd4 Normally one would retake towards the centre with  8.cxd4 but the text is slightly better. 8…Nc6 9.Nxc6 Bxc6 10.Rd1 0–0 11.Bd3 Nh5 12.Bg3 h6 13.Nc4 Nxg3 14.hxg3 This time it’s appropriate to take towards the centre as it opens the h-file, allowing the rook to focus on the enemy king’s position. 14…Qc7 15.f4 d6 16.Ne3 Bringing forces over to the kingside. 16…Rad8 17.Qe2 Qb7 18.Ng4 Rfe8 The critical position 19.Rd2? White missed the chance of a possible win if he had proceeded with his sacrificial attack immediately.19…e5 Black would like to bring his bishop to g5 with the dual purposes of shoring up his defences and attacking along the dark diagonal. 20.Nxh6+! gxh6 21.Qg4+ Kh7 22.Qf5+ The king must remain in contact with his h-pawn. For example, if 22…Kg7 22…Kg8 23.Rxh6 and White has a number of different mating combinations. 23.Qg4+ Kh7 24.Qf5+ Drawn by forced repetition of moves. A good start in the tournament for the club player. His Rd. 7 game went like this:

White: M. Shaw (2020). Black: Brian McLaren (2176)

Dutch Defence [A80]

1.d4 f5 2.Nf3 Nf6 3.Bf4 e6 4.e3 b6 5.Bd3 Bb7 6.c4 Bb4+ 7.Nc3 Bxc3+ 8.bxc3 0–0 9.Qb3 d6 10.c5 Bd5 11.c4 Be4 12.cxd6 cxd6 13.Be2 Nc6 14.Qa3 A double hit on d6. 14…e5 15.dxe5 dxe5 16.Nxe5 Nxe5 17.Bxe5 Black has lost a pawn so far in these exchanges and seeks to catch up, but there’s an old adage about the danger of snatching at knights’ pawns. 17…Bxg2 18.Rg1 Bc6 19.Rd1 Suddenly all White’s pieces have long files and diagonals to exploit. 19…Qc8 20.Qd6 Ne8 21.Qh6! piling on the pressure. 21…Qb7 22.Bh5 Qe7 23.Qxc6 Qxe5 24.Qxa8 Qxh2 25.Rh1 1-0 Black is a whole rook down with no compensation.

Last week’s 2-mover was solved by 1.f4! and if Black tries to prevent 2.Qe4 mate with 1…Rh5, it allows 2.Bf3 mate.

Simon Bartlet (Newquay) and Andrew Footner (Yeovil) are regulars on the congress circuit, and here they are at the Paignton Congress in 2003. Bartlett (W) has had his opponent on the back foot for some time, but is still a pawn down. How can he win immediately?

White to play and win.

Devonian Progress at the World Seniors.

There were 3 adopted Devonians at the World Seniors Championship being held in Italy.

Mark Jordon posted this report on Rds. 7 & 8 on the ECF website.

Meyrick Shaw at the World Seniors – Rounds 7 & 8

 Meyrick Shaw cropped


In the last installment we reported that Keith Arkell had reached 5/6 in the 50+ and was about to face GM Mohr (2443) in Round 7. Unfortunately for his hopes of at least repeating the success of his Silver medal last time, Arkell lost against a player who is clearly on form. Therefore, to keep his chances of a medal alive, Arkell needed a win in Round 8. This was not to be, and he suffered another loss, this time at the hands of GM Ivanov (2506). If he finishes strongly he still has a chance of a medal but this is a big ask given his present position in the rankings and with only three rounds to go. If he doesn’t win a medal he at least has some compensation in the form of a win, on a tiebreak with Mohr, in the Seniors Blitz event which took place on the first rest day. 

The battle for the first is proving very competitive with no-one managing to break clear of the pack. After round 8 Nikolic, tournament favourite and former World Championship Candidate, is in the lead on 6.5/8 with GMs Rosentalis, Ivanov and Mohr in hot pursuit on 6/8. Of the other English participants, Meyrick Shaw is having a very good tournament with a performance well above his current rating and a score of 4.5/8. Brian Hewson is on 3.5/8 and Owen Phillips 3/8.

His final report included this para:

Meyrick Shaw, as mentioned in previous articles, had a very good tournament, defeating IM Smolin (2295) and achieving draws against GM Kristiensen (2420) and IM Soylu (2377) along the way, and ended with a score of 6/11 and an 80 point boost to his Elo. The other English participants were Brian Hewson 5.5/11 and Owen Phillips 5/11, both of whom performed creditably.

Now that the event is over, here is a preview of the Western Morning News column for Saturday, which takes the story a little further…

Acqui Terme, midway between Genoa and Turin, is said to be one of the prettiest towns in Italy, and for most of November has been hosting the World Seniors Chess Championships. The bulk of the English entry in the one hundred strong 50–65 yrs section, was made up of three adopted Devonians; Keith Arkell (Paignton), who came 1st= last year, Meyrick Shaw (Exmouth) and Brian Hewson (Tiverton). This time, however, Arkell (4th seed) couldn’t quite maintain his previous form and finished 12th= on 7/11 points, and not very far behind him were Shaw (60th seed) 30th= on 6 pts and Hewson (53rd seed), 45th= on 5½, which made Shaw’s the stand-out performance. In Rd. 1 he was paired against a Grandmaster.

White: M. Shaw (2020). Black: GM Jens  Kristianson (2420).

1.d4 Nf6 2.Nf3 e6 3.Bf4 b6 4.Nbd2 Bb7 5.c3 Be7 6.Qc2 c5 7.e4 cxd4 8.Nxd4 Normally one would retake towards the centre with  8.cxd4 but the text is slightly better. 8…Nc6 9.Nxc6 Bxc6 10.Rd1 0–0 11.Bd3 Nh5 12.Bg3 h6 13.Nc4 Nxg3 14.hxg3 This time it’s appropriate to take towards the centre as it opens the h-file, allowing the rook to focus on the enemy king’s position. 14…Qc7 15.f4 d6 16.Ne3 Bringing forces over to the kingside. 16…Rad8 17.Qe2 Qb7 18.Ng4 Rfe8 The critical position 19.Rd2? White missed the chance of a possible win if he had proceeded with his sacrificial attack immediately.19…e5 Black would like to bring his bishop to g5 with the dual purposes of shoring up his defences and attacking along the dark diagonal. 20.Nxh6+! gxh6 21.Qg4+ Kh7 22.Qf5+ The king must remain in contact with his h-pawn. For example, if 22…Kg7 22…Kg8 23.Rxh6 and White has a number of different mating combinations. 23.Qg4+ Kh7 24.Qf5+ Drawn by forced repetition of moves. A good start in the tournament for the club player.   His Rd. 7 game went like this:

White: M. Shaw (2020). Black: Brian McLaren (2176)

Dutch Defence [A80]

1.d4 f5 2.Nf3 Nf6 3.Bf4 e6 4.e3 b6 5.Bd3 Bb7 6.c4 Bb4+ 7.Nc3 Bxc3+ 8.bxc3 0–0 9.Qb3 d6 10.c5 Bd5 11.c4 Be4 12.cxd6 cxd6 13.Be2 Nc6 14.Qa3 A double hit on d6. 14…e5 15.dxe5 dxe5 16.Nxe5 Nxe5 17.Bxe5 Black has lost a pawn so far in these exchanges and seeks to catch up, but there’s an old adage about the danger of snatching at knights’ pawns. 17…Bxg2 18.Rg1 Bc6 19.Rd1 Suddenly all White’s pieces have long files and diagonals to exploit. 19…Qc8 20.Qd6 Ne8 21.Qh6! piling on the pressure. 21…Qb7 22.Bh5 Qe7 23.Qxc6 Qxe5 24.Qxa8 Qxh2 25.Rh1 1-0 Black is a whole rook down with no compensation.

New Faces At the Torbay Congress (21.11.2015.)

There was a slight feeling of déjà vu at last weekend’s 49th Torbay Congress as it returned to the Livermead House Hotel on Torquay seafront only weeks after the Paignton Congress had used it. Yet interest was maintained by having some new faces among the regulars. 9 yr old Adam Hussein of Truro, for example, who had not only played for Cornwall shortly before but beat his much higher-graded opponent. He finished with a creditable 3/5 pts. in the Minor.

Also, among the older players was 5-times champion of Kenya, Humphrey Andolo, recently moved to Plymouth University. Going in to the final round, Ali Jaunooby was the clear leader and only needed to draw to be assured of 1st place, while Andolo had to win. Here’s how it went.

White: A. Jaunooby (202). Black: H. Andolo. (190).

Queen’s Pawn Game [D00]

1.d4 Nf6 2.Bf4 d5 3.e3 e6 4.Nd2 Bd6 5.Bg3 c5 6.c3 Nc6 7.f4 0–0 8.Bd3 Ne7 9.Qf3 Qb6 10.Rb1 Preventing White from castling queen side. 10…cxd4 11.exd4 Nf5 12.Bf2 Be7 13.Ne2 Bd7 14.g4 Rather than castling, White decides to launch what he hopes will be a fierce attack. 14…Nd6 15.Ng3 Qa5 16.a3 Bb5 17.Bc2 Nc4 18.g5 Ne8 19.h4 f5 20.Nxc4 Bxc4 21.Kd2 White’s king sets off on a westward trek. 21…Nd6 22.Rhe1 Ne4+ 23.Nxe4 dxe4 24.Qd1 Rac8 25.Bb3 Bd6 26.Be3 All White’s pieces have become very cramped for space, in contrast with Black’s 26…Rfd8 27.Bxc4 Rxc4 28.Qb3 Qd5 29.Kc2 b5 30.Ra1 a5 31.h5 b4 Black picks this moment to start asking more serious questions of the White defences. 32.axb4 Bxb4! The defending pawn is pinned allowing this decisive intrusion by the bishop. 33.Kb1 Bxc3 34.Rc1 If 34.bxc3 Rb4 pinning the queen. 35.Qb2 Rxb2+ 36.Kxb2 Rb8+ 37.Kc1 Qb3 38.Kd2 Qb2+ 39.Kd1 Qxa1+ etc. 34…Bxd4 35.Rxc4 Bxe3 36.g6 If 36.Rc3 Bxf4 37.Qxd5 exd5 38.Rc5 Bxg5 39.Raxa5 36…Qd3+ 37.Qxd3 exd3 38.Rca4 d2 39.Kc2 hxg6 40.hxg6 Kf8 41.Rxa5 Ke7 42.R5a4 Rc8+ 43.Kd3 Rc1 0-1 The d-pawn must queen.

So after Andolo, Jaunooby came joint 2nd with Paul Helbig and Robert Thompson, both of Bristol. The U-189 Grading pirze went jointly to Stephens Dilleigh (Bristol) and Homer (Newton Abbot). Other prizewinners were as follows:

Major (U-170): 1st= R. Taylor (Malpas), P. Jackson (Coulsdon) & A. Waters (Rainham). GP U-159 1st= J. Nyman (King’s Head) & R. D. Knight (Yeovil). U-150: J. Ayres (Scarborough).

Intermediate (U-140): 1st= S. Williams (Cwmbran), S. Chadaway (Olton) & T. Greenaway (Torquay). GP (U-134) M. Fielding (Bristol). U-130: T. Crouch (Pimlico). Minor (U-120): 1st= R. Ludlow (Trowbridge), P. McConnell (S. Hams), M. Jones (Newquay), A. Fraser (Bromley) & J. Blackmore (Newton Abbot).

Last week’s position was solved by 1…Nf4+ If 2.BxN the RxQ and White can’t retake because of Qe1 mate.

This 2-mover featured in this year’s British Solving Championship.

White to mate in 2

.

Shock early result in the Newman Cup (rapidplay) 19.11.2015.

The Exmouth team made their annual pilgrimage to Seaton on a dark stormy midwinter night (nothing unusual there), with little hope of doing anything much against the new Champions. Sure enough, on arrival the home team were at maximum possible strength (599 rapidplay grading points) while the visitors were c. 50 points light. However, their low expectations proved unfounded as the match turned out to be what might possibly be one of the biggest upsets of the season in Devon chess.

Scott and Jones had no trouble in holding the fort in the middle order. In fact, in Game 2,  Scott, with plenty of time left, a rampant queen and in no immediate trouble,  let off his opponent with a draw when he had only seconds left on his clock. Blake had some careful defending to do at times in spite of his material advantage, but managed to avoid any potential pitfalls, while team captain, Mark Abbott was on top form and enjoyed 2 decisive wins against the most highly-graded rapidplay expert active in the DCCA leagues.

Everyone in Devon chess was pleased that earlier in the year Seaton had won their first DCCA trophy, the Newman Cup, very well-deserved after many years of trying, and indeed, they may yet retain it this year, in spite of this inauspicious start. But as in all sports, while winning a trophy is one thing – retaining it is quite another.  

  Newman Cup (rapid)             19.11.2015.  
  Seaton   Rd1 Rd2   Rd1 Rd2 Exmouth  
1 Jonathan Underwood 202 0 0   1 1 Mark Abbott 166
2 Steve Dean 150 ½ ½   ½ ½ Chris Scott 157
3 Martyn Adams 139 ½ ½   ½ ½ Bob Jones 137
4 Alan Dowse 108 0 0   1 1 Simon Blake   92
  Totals 599 1 1   3 3   552
  Grand total   2   6    

 

Ready for the Off - Scott v Dean (nearest) and Abbott v Underwood.

Bd. 2 gets under way, with the Newman Cup on display.

Simon Blake (W) vs Alan Dowse at the start of Rd. 2.

Exmouth Seniors Congress – 5th & Final day (6th Nov. 2015.)

 Seniors Final Round and Cross Table. 

Bd White     Result Black    
               
1 Everson, Robert J 165 [3½] ½ – ½ Toms, David A 162 [3½]
2 Adaway, William 175 [3] ½ – ½ Norman, Kenneth 184 [3½]
3 Dow, Michael J 110 [3] ½ – ½ Gamble, Raymond 160 [3]
4 Annetts, Ivor S 151 [3] ½ – ½ Smith, Richard J 128 [3]
5 Footner, Andrew F 177 [2½] ½ – ½ Wood, Peter C 141 [3]
               
6 Robertson, Jim 135 [2½] 0 – 1 Kendall, Paul SN 177 [2½]
7 Egan, William J 130 [2½] 0 – 1 Gosling, Brian GE 154 [2½]
8 Smith, Ewart J 140 [2½] 1 – 0 Lucas, Peter 94 [2½]
9 Price, Andrew 160 [2] 1 – 0 Tidy, Norman F 118 [2]
10 Page, Martin C 153 [2] 1 – 0 Dean, Michael J 108 [2]
               
11 Adams, Martyn W 130 [2] ½ – ½ Scowen, Roger S 143 [2]
12 Gordon, Philip L 120 [2] ½ – ½ Sandercock, E Barry 141 [2]
13 Belt, Malcolm 133 [2] 1 – 0 Clapp, Joseph D 118 [2]
14 Harris, William F 133 [2] ½ – ½ Fraser, Alan R 107 [2]
15 Burt, David F 101 [2] 0 – 1 Hunt, Ray K 132 [2]
               
16 Shaddick, John 131 [1½] ½ – ½ Hurn, Robert AJ 124 [2]
17 Sherriff, Alan J 142 [1½] 1 – 0 Waters, Roger G 110 [1½]
18 Errington, Paul T 126 [1½] 1 – 0 Kaye, Mike 92 [1½]
19 Cox, Marian 87 [1½] 0 – 1 Jones, Robert H 118 [1½]
20 Namouk, Omer A 135 [1] 1 – 0 Cox, Reg E 88 [1]
               
21 Leggett, Peter AW 85 [1] ½ – ½ Welch, Hazel 107 [1]
22 Moloney, Tom 70 [1] ½ – ½ Thorpe-Tracey, Stephen F 94 [1]
23 Queen, Andrew R 75 [0] ½ – ½ Purry, Nigel A 98 [½]

 

Pos Name Grade Rd. 1 Rd. 2 Rd. 3 Rd. 4 Rd. 5 A B C D
1 Everson, Robert J 165 b13+ w29+ b31+ b2= w3= 4 5 897 179
2 Norman, Kenneth I 184 b30+ w17+ b6+ w1= b4= 4 5 938 188
3 Toms, David A 162 w27+ b5= w33+ w14+ b1= 4 5 900 180
                       
4 Adaway, William 175 w34+ b8= w25+ b7= w2= 5 868 174
5 Annetts, Ivor S 151 b19+ w3= w9= b15+ w11= 5 829 166
6 Dow, Michael J 110 b44+ w10+ w2- b29+ w7= 5 771 154
7 Gamble, Raymond J 160 b23+ w14= b37+ w4= b6= 5 825 165
8 Gosling, Brian GE 154 b35+ w4= b14- w18+ b19+ 5 843 169
9 Kendall, Paul SN 177 b10= w36+ b5= w19= b27+ 5 802 160
10 Smith, Ewart J 140 w9= b6- w45+ b25+ w26+ 5 705 141
11 Smith, Richard J 128 b29- w41+ b30+ w23+ b5= 5 763 153
12 Wood, Peter C 141 bye= b34= w21+ w31+ b14= 4 620 155
                       
13 Belt, Malcolm 133 w1- b43+ w26= b33= w32+ 3 5 642 128
14 Footner, Andrew F 177 w28+ b7= w8+ b3- w12= 3 5 808 162
15 Hunt, Ray K 132 b17- w42+ b44+ w5- b31+ 3 5 664 133
16 Page, Martin C 153 w18= b25= w32= b24= w33+ 3 5 653 131
17 Price, Andrew 160 w15+ b2- w24= b32= w36+ 3 5 730 146
                       
18 Adams, Martyn W 130 b16= w21+ bye= b8- w29= 4 557 139
19 Egan, William J 130 w5- b45+ w38+ b9= w8- 5 665 133
20 Errington, Paul T 126 w45= b27= bye= b26- w38+ 4 419 105
21 Fraser, Alan R 107 w46+ b18- b12- w34+ b23= 5 614 123
22 Gordon, Philip L 120 w26- b37- w46+ b43+ w28= 5 509 102
23 Harris, William F 133 w7- b26+ w43+ b11- w21= 5 596 119
24 Hurn, Robert AJ 124 b31- w39+ b17= w16= b35= 5 630 126
25 Jones, Robert H 118 bye+ w16= b4- w10- b37+ 4 488 122
26 Lucas, Peter 94 b22+ w23- b13= w20+ b10- 5 646 129
27 Robertson, Jim 135 b3- w20= b41+ w37+ w9- 5 653 131
28 Sandercock, E Barry 141 b14- w31- b35+ w44+ b22= 5 630 126
29 Scowen, Roger S 143 w11+ b1- w36+ w6- b18= 5 651 130
30 Sherriff, Alan J 142 w2- b33= w11- b45+ w42+ 5 630 126
                       
31 Burt, David F 101 w24+ b28+ w1- b12- w15- 2 5 629 126
32 Clapp, Joseph D 118 b41= w35= b16= w17= b13- 2 5 619 124
33 Dean, Michael J 108 b39+ w30= b3- w13= b16- 2 5 606 121
34 Namouk, Omer A 135 b4- w12= b42= b21- w44+ 2 5 578 116
35 Shaddick, John 131 w8- b32= w28- b46+ w24= 2 5 578 116
36 Tidy, Norman F 118 w38+ b9- b29- w39+ b17- 2 5 586 117
                       
37 Cox, Marian 87 b42= w22+ w7- b27- w25- 5 502 100
38 Kaye, Mike 92 b36- w40+ b19- w42= b20- 5 454 91
39 Leggett, Peter AW 85 w33- b24- w40+ b36- w43= 5 427 85
40 Moloney, Tom 70 w43- b38- b39- bye+ w41= 4 228 57
41 Thorpe-Tracey, S. 94 w32= b11- w27- bye= b40= 4 350 88
42 Waters, Roger G 110A w37= b15- w34= b38= b30- 5 488 98
43 Welch, Hazel 107A b40+ w13- b23- w22- b39= 5 441 88
                       
44 Cox, Reg E 88A w6- b46+ w15- b28- b34- 1 5 419 84
45 Purry, Nigel A 98A b20= w19- b10- w30- b46= 1 5 457 91
                       
46 Queen, Andrew R 75 b21- w44- b22- w35- w45= ½ 5 323 65
Pos Name Grade Rd. 1 Rd. 2 Rd. 3 Rd. 4 Rd. 5 A B C D
1 Everson, Robert J 165 b13+ w29+ b31+ b2= w3= 4 5 897 179
2 Norman, Kenneth I 184 b30+ w17+ b6+ w1= b4= 4 5 938 188
3 Toms, David A 162 w27+ b5= w33+ w14+ b1= 4 5 900 180
                       
4 Adaway, William 175 w34+ b8= w25+ b7= w2= 5 868 174
5 Annetts, Ivor S 151 b19+ w3= w9= b15+ w11= 5 829 166
6 Dow, Michael J 110 b44+ w10+ w2- b29+ w7= 5 771 154
7 Gamble, Raymond J 160 b23+ w14= b37+ w4= b6= 5 825 165
8 Gosling, Brian GE 154 b35+ w4= b14- w18+ b19+ 5 843 169
9 Kendall, Paul SN 177 b10= w36+ b5= w19= b27+ 5 802 160
10 Smith, Ewart J 140 w9= b6- w45+ b25+ w26+ 5 705 141
11 Smith, Richard J 128 b29- w41+ b30+ w23+ b5= 5 763 153
12 Wood, Peter C 141 bye= b34= w21+ w31+ b14= 4 620 155
                       
13 Belt, Malcolm 133 w1- b43+ w26= b33= w32+ 3 5 642 128
14 Footner, Andrew F 177 w28+ b7= w8+ b3- w12= 3 5 808 162
15 Hunt, Ray K 132 b17- w42+ b44+ w5- b31+ 3 5 664 133
16 Page, Martin C 153 w18= b25= w32= b24= w33+ 3 5 653 131
17 Price, Andrew 160 w15+ b2- w24= b32= w36+ 3 5 730 146
                       
18 Adams, Martyn W 130 b16= w21+ bye= b8- w29= 4 557 139
19 Egan, William J 130 w5- b45+ w38+ b9= w8- 5 665 133
20 Errington, Paul T 126 w45= b27= bye= b26- w38+ 4 419 105
21 Fraser, Alan R 107 w46+ b18- b12- w34+ b23= 5 614 123
22 Gordon, Philip L 120 w26- b37- w46+ b43+ w28= 5 509 102
23 Harris, William F 133 w7- b26+ w43+ b11- w21= 5 596 119
24 Hurn, Robert AJ 124 b31- w39+ b17= w16= b35= 5 630 126
25 Jones, Robert H 118 bye+ w16= b4- w10- b37+ 4 488 122
26 Lucas, Peter 94 b22+ w23- b13= w20+ b10- 5 646 129
27 Robertson, Jim 135 b3- w20= b41+ w37+ w9- 5 653 131
28 Sandercock, E Barry 141 b14- w31- b35+ w44+ b22= 5 630 126
29 Scowen, Roger S 143 w11+ b1- w36+ w6- b18= 5 651 130
30 Sherriff, Alan J 142 w2- b33= w11- b45+ w42+ 5 630 126
                       
31 Burt, David F 101 w24+ b28+ w1- b12- w15- 2 5 629 126
32 Clapp, Joseph D 118 b41= w35= b16= w17= b13- 2 5 619 124
33 Dean, Michael J 108 b39+ w30= b3- w13= b16- 2 5 606 121
34 Namouk, Omer A 135 b4- w12= b42= b21- w44+ 2 5 578 116
35 Shaddick, John 131 w8- b32= w28- b46+ w24= 2 5 578 116
36 Tidy, Norman F 118 w38+ b9- b29- w39+ b17- 2 5 586 117
                       
37 Cox, Marian 87 b42= w22+ w7- b27- w25- 5 502 100
38 Kaye, Mike 92 b36- w40+ b19- w42= b20- 5 454 91
39 Leggett, Peter AW 85 w33- b24- w40+ b36- w43= 5 427 85
40 Moloney, Tom 70 w43- b38- b39- bye+ w41= 4 228 57
41 Thorpe-Tracey, S. 94 w32= b11- w27- bye= b40= 4 350 88
42 Waters, Roger G 110A w37= b15- w34= b38= b30- 5 488 98
43 Welch, Hazel 107A b40+ w13- b23- w22- b39= 5 441 88
                       
44 Cox, Reg E 88A w6- b46+ w15- b28- b34- 1 5 419 84
45 Purry, Nigel A 98A b20= w19- b10- w30- b46= 1 5 457 91
                       
46 Queen, Andrew R 75 b21- w44- b22- w35- w45= ½ 5 323 65

…and the Juniors finished as follows:-

Bd White     Result Black    
               
1 Heppell, Ian N 179 [3] 1 – 0 Brown, Alan M 187 [3]
2 Wells, Jonathan C 182 [3] ½ – ½ McAllan, Ian 159 [3]
3 Page, Mark E 189 [2½] 1 – 0 Dilleigh, Stephen P 187 [2½]
4 Dean, Steve K 164 [2] ½ – ½ Morgan, Jamie 158 [2]
5 Burton, Ronnie 160 [2] 1 – 0 Blencowe, Ian P 134 [2]
               
6 Rogers, David R 140 [1½] 1 – 0 Bartlett, Simon 167 [1½]
7 Roberts, Malcolm A 135 [1½] ½ – ½ Sellwood, Colin 156 [1]

 

Pos Name Grade Rd. 1 Rd. 2 Rd. 3 Rd. 4 Rd. 5 A B C D
1 Heppell, Ian N 179 w12+ b14+ w4= b2= w5+ 4 5 973 195
                       
2 McAllan, Ian 159 b3+ b5= w13+ w1= b4= 5 1004 201
3 Page, Mark E 189 w2- b15+ w5= b13+ w8+ 5 952 190
4 Wells, Jonathan C 182 b15+ w10+ b1= w8= w2= 5 919 184
                       
5 Brown, Alan M 187 b9+ w2= b3= w6+ b1- 3 5 895 179
6 Burton, Ronnie 160 bye= b7= w14+ b5- w11+ 3 4 691 173
                       
7 Dean, Steve K 164 b11= w6= b10= bye= w9= 4 592 148
8 Dilleigh, Stephen P 187 w14- b12+ w9+ b4= b3- 5 832 166
9 Morgan, Jamie 158 w5- bye+ b8- w10+ b7= 4 628 157
10 Rogers, David R 140 bye+ b4- w7= b9- w13+ 4 619 155
                       
11 Blencowe, Ian P 134 w7= b13- w12= b14+ b6- 2 5 732 146
12 Roberts, Malcolm A 135 b1- w8- b11= bye+ w14= 2 4 540 135
                       
13 Bartlett, Simon 167 bye= w11+ b2- w3- b10- 4 522 131
14 Sellwood, Colin 156 b8+ w1- b6- w11- b12= 5 695 139
                       
15 Halmkin, Peter E 152 w4- w3-       0 2 271 136

…. and the prizewinners were……

Seniors Section: 

                   1st=  Kenneth Norman     (189)                         4pts

                           Robert Everson       (165)        Dartford     4pts

                           David Toms             (162)     Sidmouth     4pts

 Grading prizes: 

 (U-136)      1st   Richard Smith    (128)   Barnstaple     3½ pts 

(U-115)      1st   Michael Dow       (110)  Barnstaple     3½ pts

“Juniors” Section:

                   1st    Ian Heppell       (179)   Wimbledon        4pts 

                   2nd= Mark Page         (189)   Kenilworth          3½ pts  

                          Jonathan Wells (182)   N. Norfolk           3½ pts                                                         

 Grading prize:

 (U-161)      1st  Ian McAllan         (159)  Sidcup                3½ pts

                    2nd Ronnie Burton     (160)   Weymouth          3 pts     

 NB: The prize fund for the Junior Section, which was very strong again this year, has been increased somewhat. 

Exmouth Seniors Congress Day 4 (5th Nov. 2015)

Of the earlier low-graded high-fliers, Michael Dow and Joseph Clapp refused to be intimidated and continued their flight in the upper atmosphere. There was bad luck for one high-flier when his phone went off, not once but twice. Which reminded me of what happened to an Exmouth clubmate a few years ago in the same room, when a friend phoned him up to ask when he might be free, and the phone went off. Q: What time do you think your game might finish? A: It just has! 

The surprise of the Junior Section was how Sellwood, on the back of his best-ever (short) run of results, now fell to Blencowe, which, in turn, was Ian’s best-ever tournament result, showing what an unpredictable thing chess can be…  especially at a Seniors event.

Bd White     Result Black    
               
1 Norman, Kenneth I 184 [3] ½ – ½ Everson, Robert J 165 [3]
2 Toms, David A 162 [2½] 1 – 0 Footner, Andrew F 177 [2½]
3 Gamble, Raymond J 160 [2½] ½ – ½ Adaway, William 175 [2½]
4 Kendall, Paul SN 177 [2] ½ – ½ Egan, William J 130 [2]
5 Hunt, Ray K 132 [2] 0 – 1 Annetts, Ivor S 151 [2]
               
6 Scowen, Roger S 143 [2] 0 – 1 Dow, Michael J 110 [2]
7 Wood, Peter C 141 [2] 1 – 0 Burt, David F 101 [2]
8 Smith, Richard J 128 [2] 1 – 0 Harris, William F 133 [2]
9 Gosling, Brian GE 154 [1½] 1 – 0 Adams, Martyn W 130 [2]
10 Clapp, Joseph D 118 [1½] ½ – ½ Price, Andrew 160 [1½]
               
11 Hurn, Robert AJ 124 [1½] ½ – ½ Page, Martin C 153 [1½]
12 Jones, Robert H 118 [1½] 0 – 1 Smith, Ewart J 140 [1½]
13 Robertson, Jim 135 [1½] 1 – 0 Cox, Marian 87 [1½]
14 Dean, Michael J 108 [1½] ½ – ½ Belt, Malcolm 133 [1½]
15 Lucas, Peter 94 [1½] 1 – 0 Errington, Paul T 126 [1½]
               
16 Sandercock, E Barry 141 [1] 1 – 0 Cox, Reg E 88 [1]
17 Fraser, Alan R 107 [1] 1 – 0 Namouk, Omer A 135 [1]
18 Welch, Hazel 107 [1] 0 – 1 Gordon, Philip L 120 [1]
19 Tidy, Norman F 118 [1] 1 – 0 Leggett, Peter AW 85 [1]
20 Kaye, Mike 92 [1] ½ – ½ Waters, Roger G 110 [1]
               
21 Purry, Nigel A 98 [½] 0 – 1 Sherriff, Alan J 142 [½]
22 Queen, Andrew R 7 [0] 0 – 1 Shaddick, John 131 [½]
23 Moloney, Tom 70 [0] 1 – 0  Bye    
24 Thorpe-Tracey, Stephen F 94 [½] ½ – 0  Bye    

 

Bd White     Result Black    
               
1 McAllan, Ian 159 [2½] ½ – ½ Heppell, Ian N 179 [2½]
2 Wells, Jonathan C 182 [2½] ½ – ½ Dilleigh, Stephen P 187 [2]
3 Brown, Alan M 187 [2] 1 – 0 Burton, Ronnie 160 [2]
4 Bartlett, Simon 167 [1½] 0 – 1 Page, Mark E 189 [1½]
5 Morgan, Jamie 158 [1] 1 – 0 Rogers, David R 140 [1½]
               
6 Sellwood, Colin 156 [1] 0 – 1 Blencowe, Ian P 134 [1]
7 Roberts, Malcolm A 135 [½] 1 – 0  Bye    
8 Dean, Steve K 164 [1½] ½ – 0  bye    

16th Exmouth Seniors Congress Day 3 (04.11.2015.)

In all his 15 previous Seniors Tournaments, David Burt had to confess he’d never before been as high as Board 2, and nor could Michael Dow nor Marian Cox have expected to be flying so high, and it fell to me to be playing last year’s winner. But, like Icarus, we were perhaps flying too near the sun, and the force of gravity would surely reassert itself. And so it did. Even Colin Sellwood in the Juniors, after his dream weekend taking the heads of Johhn Wheeler and Steve Dilleigh in the space of 24 hours, fell to earth with a bump. 

Here are the Rd. 3 details, Seniors table first:-      

Bd White     Result Black    
               
1 Dow, Michael J 110 [2] 0 – 1 Norman, Kenneth I 184 [2]
2 Burt, David F 101 [2] 0 – 1 Everson, Robert J 165 [2]
3 Footner, Andrew F 177 [1½] 1 – 0 Gosling, Brian GE 154 [1½]
4 Annetts, Ivor S 151 [1½] ½ – ½ Kendall, Paul SN 177 [1½]
5 Adaway, William 175 [1½] 1 – 0 Jones, Robert H 118 [1½]
               
6 Toms, David A 162 [1½] 1 – 0 Dean, Michael J 108 [1½]
7 Cox, Marian 87 [1½] 0 – 1 Gamble, Raymond J 160 [1½]
8 Price, Andrew 160 [1] ½ – ½ Hurn, Robert AJ 124 [1]
9 Page, Martin C 153 [1] ½ – ½ Clapp, Joseph D 118 [1]
10 Scowen, Roger S 143 [1] 1 – 0 Tidy, Norman F 118 [1]
               
11 Wood, Peter C 141 [1] 1 – 0 Fraser, Alan R 107 [1]
12 Belt, Malcolm 133 [1] ½ – ½ Lucas, Peter 94 [1]
13 Harris, William F 133 [1] 1 – 0 Welch, Hazel 107 [1]
14 Cox, Reg E 88 [1] 0 – 1 Hunt, Ray K 132 [1]
15 Egan, William J 130 [1] 1 – 0 Kaye, Mike 92 [1]
               
16 Sherriff, Alan J 142 [½] 0 – 1 Smith, Richard J 128 [1]
17 Smith, Ewart J 140 [½] 1 – 0 Purry, Nigel A 98 [½]
18 Waters, Roger G 110 [½] ½ – ½ Namouk, Omer A 135 [½]
19 Thorpe-Tracey, Stephen F 94 [½] 0 – 1 Robertson, Jim 135 [½]
20 Shaddick, John 131 [½] 0 – 1 Sandercock, E Barry 141 [0]
               
21 Gordon, Philip L 120 [0] 1 – 0 Queen, Andrew R 75 [0]
22 Leggett, Peter AW 85 [0] 1 – 0 Moloney, Tom 70 [0]
23 Adams, Martyn W 130 [1½] ½ – 0  Bye    
24 Errington, Paul T 126 [1] ½ – 0  Bye    

 

Bd White     Result Black    
               
1 Heppell, Ian N 179 [2] ½ – ½ Wells, Jonathan C 182 [2]
2 McAllan, Ian 159 [1½] 1 – 0 Bartlett, Simon 167 [1½]
3 Page, Mark E 189 [1] ½ – ½ Brown, Alan M 187 [1½]
4 Dilleigh, Stephen P 187 [1] 1 – 0 Morgan, Jamie 158 [1]
5 Rogers, David R 140 [1] ½ – ½ Dean, Steve K 164 [1]
               
6 Burton, Ronnie 160 [1] 1 – 0 Sellwood, Colin 156 [1]
7 Blencowe, Ian P 134 [½] ½ – ½ Roberts, Malcolm A 135 [0]

Top boards in the Seniors: never has the bearded Dave Burt been as high as No. 2 in all his previous 15 appearances, nor Marian Cox as high as Bd. 7

 

Colin Sellwood (nearest) still on a high after his Rd. 1 win over Dilliegh.

 

The 2 Controllers - Ewart Smith (l) now enjoying his new role as player as Tony Tatam succeeds him.

16th Seniors’ Congress Day 2 (03.11.2015.)

The Round 2 draw and early results were as follows:

    SENIORS     ROUND 2  
Bd   White   Result          Black  
             
1 1 Norman, Kenneth I 184  1-0 Price, Andrew 160
2 7 Gamble, Raymond 160  ½ – ½ Footner, Andrew F 177
3 9 Gosling, Brian GE 154  ½ – ½ Adaway, William 175
4 5 Everson, Robert J 165  1-0 Scowen, Roger S 143
5 11 Annetts, Ivor S 151  ½ – ½ Toms, David A 162
             
6 3 Kendall, Paul SN 177  1-0 Tidy, Norman F 118
7 31 Jones, Robert H 118 ½ – ½  Page, Martin C 153
8 33 Dow, Michael J 110  1-0 Smith, Ewart J 140
9 23 Adams, Martyn W 130  1-0 Fraser, Alan R 107
10 35 Dean, Michael J 108   Sherriff, Alan J 142
             
11 37 Welch, Hazel 107  0-1 Belt, Malcolm 133
12 14 Sandercock, Barry 141  0-1 Burt, David F 101
13 40 Lucas, Peter 94  0-1 Harris, William F 133
14 17 Namouk, Omer A 135  ½ – ½ Wood, Peter C 141
15 25 Robertson, Jim 135  ½ – ½ Errington, Paul T 126
             
16 20 Hunt, Ray K 132  1-0 Waters, Roger G 110
17 30 Clapp, Joseph D 118  ½ – ½ Shaddick, John 131
18 39 Purry, Nigel A 98  0-1 Egan, William J 130
19 26 Smith, Richard J 128  1-0 Thorpe-Tracey, Stephen 94
20 46 Cox, Marian 87  1-0 Gordon, Philip L 120
             
21 28 Hurn, Robert AJ 124  1-0 Leggett, Peter AW 85
22 42 Kaye, Mike 92  1-0 Moloney, Tom 70
23 44 Queen, Andrew R 75  0-1 Cox, Reg E 88

 

  “JUNIORS”       ROUND 2    
Bd         White     Result           Black    
               
1 Brown, Alan M 187 [1]  ½ – ½ McAllan, Ian 159 [1]
2 Wells, Jonathan 182 [1]  1-0 Rogers, David R 140 [1]
3 Sellwood, Colin 156 [1]  0-1 Heppell, Ian N 179 [1]
4 Bartlett, Simon 167 [½]  1-0 Blencowe, Ian P 134 [½]
5 Dean, Steve K 164 [½]  ½ – ½ Burton, Ronnie 160 [½]
               
6 Halmkin, Peter E 152 [0]  0-1 Page, Mark E 189 [0]
7 Roberts, Malcolm 135 [0]  0-1 Dilleigh, Stephen 187 [0]
8 Morgan, Jamie 158 [0] 1- 0  Bye     

 

Bd. 1 Norman vs Price and Bd. 3 Gosling vs Adaway.

At the other end of the room could be found Richard Smith vs Stephen Thorpe-Tracey (nearest) and Bob Hurn vs Peter Leggett.

Next to them were Andrew Queen vs Reg Cox & Mike Kaye vs Tom Maloney

Rd. 2 pairings in the Juniors included Steve Dean vs Ronnie Burton (nearest) and Peter Halmkin vs Mark Brown.