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A Black Day Indeed for Exeter & Exmouth In Div. 1. (14.03.2015.)

Local rivals Exeter and Exmouth met in the 3rd of 4 of their scheduled Division 1 matches. Exmouth were out-done by 4 doctors to 1, but gradewise the teams were very closely matched on paper. All but one of the players were established figures on the local scene and were familiar with their opponents’ strengths, the only relatively new face being the ungraded Tristram de Piro.   

Stephens vs Paulden on Bd. 1

The first game to finish was on Bd. 4 where Scott was trying to hold an endgame position with a rook each and bishops on opposite coloured squares. With best play it might have been possible to hang on, in view of the bishops, but the pressure told and he inadvertently allowed White’s bishop to fork K & R. 1-0 to Exeter.  

Shaw then managed to convert his positional advantages into material gain, forcing a win to level the scores. Dave Regis then restored Exeter’s lead by applying constant pressure in the endgame. Shortly after, Oliver Wensley exploited the advantage a well-placed, attacking bishop pair vs two defending knights, and forced resignation, to make it 2-all. 

Almost immediately Exeter drew ahead for the 3rd time when Sean Pope made the most of a mistake by his opponent in allowing him back into the game. He won the exchange and then made equal swaps to snuff out any chance of a kingside attack.  

This assured Exeter of avoiding a loss, but the win hung on the outcome of the top game, which went into extra time after Paulden ran down to the very last second on his digital clock before completing his 40th move. He had delayed development of his queenside pieces until late in the game and was struggling to get them usefully deployed thereafter. White was the exchange up at this point and his pieces were better coordinated and were focussed on the enemy king.  However, the win wasn’t immediately clear and he had a long think over his 41st move before finding a knight pseudo-sacrifice that won immediately whether the knight was taken or not, making the final score 3-all. 

  Bremridge Cup       Sat. 14th March 2015  
  Exeter Grd     Exmouth Grd
1 Dr. T. J. Paulden 187 0 1 J. K. F. Stephens 196
2 Dr. D. Regis 181 1 0 Dr. J. W. R. Underwood 180
3 Dr. G. Body 171 0 1 M. Shaw 173
4 S. Waters 164 1 0 C. J. Scott 154
5 Dr. T. D. P. de Piro 160e 0 1 O. E. Wensley 151
6 S. Pope 141 1 0 B. G. E. Gosling 148
    1,002 3 3    

If it was unusual to have a match at this level with no drawn games, it was even more so that every game was a White win, giving the final result sheet a certain symmetry.

  Exeter          Exmouth  
1 Paulden   B 0 1 Stephens W
2 Regis   W 1 0 Underwood B
3 Body   B 0 1 Shaw W
4 Waters   W 1 0 Scott B
5 De Piro   B 0 1 Wensley W
6 Pope   W 1 0 Gosling B
        3 3    

 Exmouth’s final match in this competition is against Teignmouth, while Exeter are due to play Newton Abbot.

Meyrick Shaw gets his game going.

Exeter captain, Simon Waters, starts with an English Opening.

Oliver Wensley against Tristram de Piro.

 

Sean Pope against Brian Gosling on Bd. 6

Somerset Retain Top Trophy (14.03.2015.)

The Devon vs Somerset match at the weekend was always likely to be a championship decider, and so it proved. The 1st teams were closely matched on paper for the most part, except for the top 4 boards, all of which went Somerset’s way, making their winning total 10-6, thus retaining the Harold Meek trophy for another year. The details were:- (Somerset names first in each pairing).

1.J. Rudd (221) 1-0   D. Mackle (209). 2.D. Buckley (205) 1-0 J. Stephens (196). 3.A. Wong (199) 1-0 S. Homer (184). 4.B. Edgell (197) 1-0 J. F. Wheeler (184). 5.M. Payne (189) 0-1 P. Sivrev (175). 6.P. Krzyzanowski (187) 1-0 J. Fraser (178). 7.M. Blocinski(185) 0-1 J. Underwood (180). 8.P. Chaplin (182) 1-0 D. Regis (181). 9.A. Footner (182) 0-1 A. Brusey (181). 10.B. Morris (178) ½-½ B. Hewson (176). 11.D. Littlejohns (177) ½-½ M. Abbott (173). 12. D. Painter-Kooiman (175) 1-0 S. Martin (171). 13.J. Byrne (172) ½-½ M. Shaw (173). 14.D. Peters (171) 0-1 W. Ingham (168). 15.G. Jepps (171) ½-½ T. Thynne (168). 16. F. Felício (162) 1-0 M. Stinton-Brownbridge (168).

Devon fared better in the 2nd team match, played over 12 boards. They led by 6½-3½ but Somerset won the last 2 games to finish losing by a single point.

1. D. Freeman (163) ½-½ K. Atkins (160). 2. C. Purry (159) 1-0 N. Butland (158). 3. M. Staniforth (158) 0-1 D. A. Toms (159). 4. A. Gregory (157) 1-0 C. J. Scott (154). 5. C. Strong (155) 0-1 M. Hui (150e). 6. M. French (154) ½-½ B. Gosling (148). 7. M. Worrall (151) 1-0 P. Brooks (152). 8. C. McKinley (149) 0-1 O. Wensley (151). 9. M. Baker (148) 0-1 A. Frangleton (151). 10. C. Fewtrell (148) ½-½ A. Kinder (147). 11. J. Fewkes (145) 1-0 W. Taylor (142). 12. A. Champion (143) 0-1 V. Ramesh (138).

The West of England Championship starts a fortnight on Friday, 3rd April, at the Royal Beacon Hotel, Exmouth. With its relatively limited accommodation already nearing maximum, there’s little time left for late entries, so don’t delay. Enquiries to Meyrick Shaw on 01395-275494 or e-mail wecu@hotmail.co.uk.

This last round miniature gave White 1st prize in the recent Bristol Congress.

White: P. Krzyzanowski. Black: M. Lewis

1.d4 Nf6 2.Nf3 g6 3.c4 Bg7 4.Nc3 d5 5.Bg5 Ne4 6.cxd5 Nxg5 7.Nxg5 e6 8.Nf3 exd5 9.e3 0–0 10.Be2 c6 11.0–0 Bf5 12.Bd3 Bxd3 13.Qxd3 Nd7 14.b4 a6 15.a4 Qe7 16.b5 axb5 17.axb5 f5 18.bxc6 bxc6 19.Ra6 Rxa6 20.Qxa6 Rf6 21.Qc8+ Bf8 22.Rb1 Black now abandons his defences with fatal consequences. 22…Qa3?? 23.Qxd7 Qxc3 24.Ng5 and mate on h7 is unavoidable. 1–0

In last week’s position Rudd played 1.Rxd4! threatening both f2 and e5. 1…Nd2 (If 1…exd4 2.Bxd4 R2f7 3.Nb6+ Kb8 4.Be5 winning). 2.Rxd2 Rxd2 3.Rc4 Qxc4 4.Bxc4 Rxg2 5.Nb6+ and mate will follow after Qxe5+.

Here is another world premier 2-mover from reader Dave Howard of East Harptree.

White to mate in 2

Bristol & Exeter Congress Results (07.03.2015.)

The 40th East Devon Congress finished on Sunday after a successful weekend. The prizewinners were as follows (all scores out of 5).

Open Section: 1st= Jack Rudd (Barnstaple) & Dominic Mackle (Newton Abbot) both 4½. 3rd Lorenz Hartmann (Exeter) 4. Grading prizes: U-181: 1st= Alan Brusey; (Teignmouth); Dave Littlejohns (Taunton) & Mark Abbott  (Exmouth) all                   3½. U-169: 1st= Robert Wright (Bridport) & Jamie Morgan (Penwith) both 3.

Major (U-155) 1st John Nyman (King’s Head) 4½. 2nd= Ben Franklin (Battersea) & Neville Senior (Sedgemoor) both 4. GP (U-148) 1st= John Morrison (Tiverton) & Rob Wilby (Plymouth) both 3½. GP U-133 Lynne Fursman 3.

Minor (U-125) 1st Joy Fursman 4½. 2nd= Reece Whittington (Exeter); Nicky Bacon (Sidmouth); Mark Cockerton (Torquay) & Terence Greenaway (Torquay) all 4.            GP 102-110 James Wallman                          4         40.00

GP (U-102) Terry Dengler (Truro) 3.

Bristol’s Winter Congress was held the weekend before. The winner of the Open was Patryk Krzyzanowski, and he got the British Championship qualifying place.  2nd= were Peter Kirby, Stephan Meek, Lewis Martin, Matthew Payne and Alistair Hill.  Major Section: 1st S. Williams 4½/5. 2nd T. Chinnick 4/5.

Hill missed out on 1st prize at Exeter by virtue of losing to Jack Rudd in the final round. Here he loses to a sharp attack in Rd. 2 at Bristol.
White: A. Hill (199). Black: Matthew Payne (189).

King’s Indian Defence – Petrosian Variation. [E92]

1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 g6 3.Nc3 Bg7 4.e4 d6 5.Nf3 0–0 6.Be2 e5 7.d5 Petrosian’s move in this classical position. a5 8.Bg5 Qe8 9.Nd2 h6 10.Be3 Na6 11.0–0 Nh7 12.a3 f5 13.f3 Bd7 14.b3 f4 15.Bf2 g5 16.b4 b6 17.Qb3 Kh8 18.c5 dxc5 19.bxa5 bxa5 20.Bxa6 Rxa6 21.Bxc5 Rf7 22.Rab1 Bf8 23.Qc4 Rg6 24.Bxf8 Nxf8 25.Rb7 c6 26.Rfb1 g4 Black’s pawns storm ahead backed by bishop and rooks. 27.fxg4 Bxg4 28.dxc6 Be6 29.Qc5 f3 30.Qxe5+ Kg8 31.Rxf7 Rxg2+ 31…Qxf7 is the obvious move, but the text has the same effect. 32.Kh1 Qxf7 33.Nf1 Qa7 Threatening mate on g1 34.Ng3 Allows White’s rook to defend the kingside, but it’s not enough. 34…Rxh2+! 34…Qf2 will still win but is much slower. 35.Nh5 Rg5 36.Qxg5+ hxg5 37.Rg1. 35.Kxh2 Qf2+ 36.Kh1 Qg2# 0–1.

In last week’s problem, Alice wondered what her sister could possibly mean by referring back to her French lessons. She was, of course, alluding to the French phrase used in chess of “en passant”. If Black’s c-pawn could move to b3 it would indeed be mate, and the only way it can do that is to take White’s c-pawn en passant, which means White’s previous move must have been Pb2-b4.

This position is taken from a book chapter entitled “Simple but not easy”. Jack Rudd of Barnstaple is White and his next move contains enough threats to win the game.

White to play and win

40th East Devon Congress – Final round.

Having played each other in the penultimate round, the two top grades, Jack Rudd and Dominic Mackle, had to face other opposition. Rudd was drawn against Alistair Hill of Battersea, while Mackle faced the perennially solid Steve Dilleigh, not someone you’d want to be playing if you needed a last round win. The Rudd-Hill was over in 90 minutes, making Jack the “leader in the clubhouse”, watching how the other game was going. Eventually Jack had to leave to catch his train home,  and it was soon after that Mackle started to turn the screws and got domination in the centre with free-moving pieces, while Dilleigh’s pieces were forced to edges of the board, from where they had no counter-play.

In the Major Section John Nyman of the famous King’s Head club in London won the Major Section (U-155) and with it the Ken Schofield Salver.

Chess-playing sisters are something of a rarety on the circuit. There are the Polgars, of course, and the Eagles from Liverpool, though they are now inactive because being MPs takes up so much of their time. After that, one might be a little stuck to come up with other names, but here we had the Westcountry Fursman girls; Lynne playing in the Major and Joy in the Minor (U-125). Lynne was a little off the pace in her section, but her sister was on Bd. 1 facing local player, Mark Cockerton of Torquay. She had White, played the Bird’s Opening and happily drew her game to clinch clear 1st and the grandest of the three trophies up for grabs. Joy was truly unconfined in the foyer afterwards, so pleased was she with her success. They were taught chess by their father, and now Joy is based in Clevedon, near Bristol, and Lynne in Tewkesbury.

Here is the full prizelist.

EAST DEVON CHESS CONGRESS 2015 PRIZE LIST
           
Section Position Name Club Points Prize (£)
Open 1st= Jack Rudd (IM) Barnstaple 170.00
    Dominic Mackle Newton Abbot 170.00
  3rd Lorenz Hartmann Exeter 4 80.00
  GP 169-181= Alan Brusey Teignmouth 14.00
    David Littlejohns Taunton 14.00
    Mark Abbott Exmouth 14.00
  GP <169= Robert Wright Bridport 3 20.00
  GP <169= Jamie Morgan Penwith 3 20.00
           
Major U-155 1st John Nyman King’s Head 160.00
     2nd= Ben Franklin Battersea 4 90.00
    Neville Senior Sedgemoor 4 90.00
  GP 133-147= John Morrison Tiverton 20.00
    Rob Wilby Plymouth 20.00
  GP <133 Lynne Fursman   3 40.00
           
Minor U-125 1st Joy Fursman   160.00
     2nd= Reece Whittington Exeter 4 45.00
    Nicky Bacon Sidmouth 4 45.00
    Mark Cockerton TorquayTeignmouth 4 45.00
    Terence Greenaway Torquay 4 45.00
  GP 102-110 James Wallman   4 40.00
  GP <102 Terry Dengler Truro 3 40.00
  Team Prize   Exeter A 14 40.00

 

The start of Rd. 5 - every table occupied.

Top games: Hill vs Rudd & Mackle vs Dilleigh.

Paulden vs Wensley

Top game in the Major: Nyman vs Neville Senior.

Joy Fursman in pole position at the start of the round.

Apart from Joy Fursman, there were 4 other ladies in the Minor. Here are Frances Brightman (in blue), Hazel Welch (red) and Helen Archer-Lock.

Jack Rudd guaranteed at least a share of the Nat West Cup.

Mackle later caught to add his name to the Nat West trophy.

John Nyman, clearly happy with his prize.

Joyful Joy, winner of the Minor trophy.

Lynne is just as pleased with her sister's success.

East Devon Congress Gets Under Way (27.02.2015.)

There had been a few question marks over the future of this event earlier earlier in the year, but the committee of 2 decided to go ahead anyway, and a late rush of entries took the total above the hundred mark.

By a quirk of fate, the funeral of the event’s first secretary 40 years ago, Guy Sparke, was held a few hours before the start of Rd. 1. and in the opening remarks from the stage, the players were reminded of his contribution to creating and establishing the event on the chess calendar.

There were about 30 byes being taken on the Friday evening, but there were enough present to give the large playing area a busy look.

Dominic Mackle and committee member Mark Abbott had a chance to catch up in the 2 minute wait between the end of the speeches and the 7 p.m. start.

.... and then it was time to shake hands and start the clocks.

General view of the hall.

Bill Adaway of Bridport (l) was a winner at the Exmouth Seniors' Congress in November and could figure in the prizelist here.

 

Simon Bartlett and Dr. Tim Paulden start their Rd. 1 game.

 

Somes games in the Minor Section.

A Problem for Alice (28.02.2015.)

Bristol’s Winter Congress ended on Sunday and the winner of the top section was Patryk Krzyzanowski (Yeovil) on 4/5 points, with a 5-way tie for 2nd. Theo Slade (Barnstaple) won the Grading Prize. I hope to have more details next week. Meanwhile, games may be found on the Bristol League website, chessit.co.uk.

In last week’s position, Black finished with the no-nonsense 1…Rg1+ 2.KxR Qh2+ 3.Kf1 Qh1 mate.

WMN reader Jonathan Brewer of St. Columb has written in to remind me that it’s 150 years since the first publication of Lewis Carroll’s Alice In Wonderland. There have been newspaper articles and commemorative stamps issued, so perhaps we should follow suit.

Carroll, or the Rev. Charles Lutwidge Dodgson, to give him his full name, was a leading mathematician, lecturing in the subject at Oxford and with a dozen treatises to his credit; a pioneering photographer; an entertaining story-teller and a chess enthusiast.

Although in his first story, Alice encountered a kingdom of playing cards after falling down the rabbit hole, in the sequel, Through The Looking-Glass, she stepped through a mirror to find a new wonderland populated by anthropomorphic red and white chessmen.

The story was designed around a game of chess. This is made clear at the outset when the reader is confronted with a chess problem and the following note: “White Pawn (Alice) to play, and win in eleven moves.”

The following little sketch, which has had to be further foreshortened, is Mr. Brewer’s own commemorative offering.

“Alice and her older sister were trying to decide how to spend the afternoon. Alice was very tired because she had been up late trying to master her French homework. ‘Perhaps you would be content to pass an hour or two with a book, but I’m afraid you do find some books boring. Why don’t you have a quick look through Father’s books to see if you can find one you like, before we go outside. Some will surely be to your taste, Alice’, said the sister as she rose from the sofa, walking over to the standing bookcase that held so many books. Alice joined her and for the next few minutes both sisters browsed over the books in the study trying to find a good, hopefully engrossing, read. Alice spotted a dark blue covered volume entitled Chess Fun. Turning the crisp pages she came across a chess problem that caught her eye. After unsuccessfully trying to solve this tricky little puzzle Alice asked her sister if she could help, for you see the older sister was a far stronger player. After glancing at the problem she said mysteriously “Alice, maybe your French lessons yesterday could help you!”

Black to mate in 1. What did Alice’s sister mean?

Alice's problem - how does Black mate in 1?

E. Budleigh vs Exmouth – Chess History in the Making (25.02.2015.)

A very small piece of chess history was made when the small fledgling East Budleigh club played their first ever match against Exmouth, the current Devon champions. 

In fact, the relative strengths of the clubs had little to do with it, as the competition involved was the local League’s new Handicap RapidPlay Competition. The rules state that the total team grade must not exceed 560 (140 average) and stronger players will be handicapped in the time they are allocated on the clock, as indicated below. Team captains can thus select their teams working in two dimensions. East Budleigh chose to play their two strongest players in the hope and expectation that they would be able to rattle off their moves quickly enough to offset their time handicaps. Exmouth chose to play 76 grading points short of the permitted maximum in the hope that their extra time on the clock would make up the difference. Doubtless a delicate balance to try and judge, and get right. 

In the event the different factors seemed to balance themselves out and the match finished 4-all. The only player to finish on 100% was Simon Blake, who played on level terms timewise.  Although these matches are meant to be a bit of fun, (results don’t go for grading) in fact it was an exhausting encounter for all concerned – the players were totally shattered at the end. 

  25.02.2015                    
  Exmouth Grd mins rd 1 rd 2   rd 1 rd 2 E. Budleigh Grd mins
1 O. Wensley 149 44 ½ 0   ½ 1 K. Hurst 191 16
2 R. Jones 129 38 0 ½   1 ½ B. Gosling 157 22
3 I. Grist 108 28 0 1   1 0 M. Lester 80 32
4 S. Blake 102 30 1 1   0 0 T. Miner 70 30
  Totals 484       498  
        4   4      

 

Ready for the off. E. Budleigh on the left - Bd. 4 nearest.

 

Rd. 2 gets started.

 

Ivor Grist & Simon Blake look happy with their 3 points out of a possible 4.

Exmouth vs Tiverton in the Bremridge Cup (21.02.2015.)

Exmouth’s 2nd match in Devon’s premier inter-club competition, the Bremridge Cup, was against Tiverton (A). Their loss of Somerset players, Edgell and Littlejohns has been offset by the acquisition IM Jack Rudd and Theo Slade, which meant that they were probably even a little stronger than before. However, both teams turned out to be missing key players. Tiverton were missing Slade and Duckham, while Exmouth were without Mark Abbott and Steve Martin, which probably cancelled each other out. Another cancelling out was on Bds. 1 & 6 where Exmouth were outgraded by 28 points on Bd. 1, while Tiverton were similarly situated on Bd. 6. Overall, the total difference was just 4 points, so anything could be expected – even the unexpected. Tiverton won the toss and chose white on odd-numbered boards.  

The first game to finish was Rudd-Stephens, both regular quick starters. After just 15 minutes’ play they had reached move 15 (i.e. 30 seconds per move). Stephens went in for the Sicilian Defence with White playing 6. Bb5. Black played 7…Qb3 attacking White’s b-pawn newly abandoned by the bishop. White ignored the threat, leaving Black with the thought “shall I take it and risk the inevitable counter-threats to the advanced queen – or play safe?” Known as the Poisoned Pawn variation, for obvious reasons, top players with either colour wouldn’t go in for it if they didn’t know the risks. Rudd not only sacrificed the pawn but a knight as well, in order to achieve active play, but he chose the wrong follow-up line and after a number of equal exchanges Black finished up with the only piece on the board which was more than enough to deal with the remaining scattering pawns. 1-0 to Exmouth in under 2 hours. On Bd. 6 the game ended rather suddenly when Black resigned, even though there still seemed to be some play in it, although he had been under attack for some time. 2-0 to Exmouth. Meanwhile, Oliver Wensley had been successful in cramping his opponent’s position, while gradually building up his own kingside attack with all his pieces bearing down on the enemy king to a point where mate was unavoidable. 3-0.  

The one game spectators had mentally written off in favour of the home side was on Bd. 4 where Scott looked to be dead in the water. A pawn down, his queen and 2 rooks were cramped in a corner around his king, trying to stave off further material loss, while Black had the freedom of the board. Somehow, and nobody, least of all the losing player himself, could explain how and when it all started to go wrong, but Scott gradually extricated his queen and rook, got counter-play and finished with a sharp mating combination. 4-0.  

With the match result now decided, and there being little advantage to either side in the two remaining games, they quickly agreed draws, and everyone was left scratching their heads about what they had just witnessed.  

This left Tiverton on 50% after 3 matches, while Exmouth have 2 wins out of 2, with another tight-fought match against Exeter next up. 

  Tiverton Grd     Exmouth Grd
1 Jack Rudd 224 0 1 John Stephens 196
2 Brian Hewson 174 ½ ½ Jon Underwood 180
3 Simon Bartlett 169 ½ ½ Meyrick Shaw 173
4 Ivor Annetts 162 0 1 Chris Scott 154
5 Keith Atkins 157 0 1 Oliver Wensley 151
6 Kelvin Hunter 120 0 1 Brian Gosling 148
  Totals 1,006 1 5   1,002

  

Bd. 1 Rudd vs Stephens (furthest) & Underwood vs Hewson.

The Poisoned Pawn variation is under way.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Scott vs Annetts (nearest) - a great turn-round at the end.

Atkins vs Wensley (nearest) & Gosling vs Hunter

General view of Tiverton's club room

Successful New Schools’ Tournament (21.02.2015.)

Chess activity in secondary schools has suffered something of a decline in recent years, and in response the national Manager of Secondary Schools’ Chess, Neill Cooper, has started a new event called the Team Chess Challenge. The format is teams of 4 playing four rounds of 25 minutes each. The first South-West Regional final took place last week at Torquay Boys’ Grammar School, organised by Trefor Thynne. The entry was surprisingly large and varied, which suggests the event has succeeded in its aim and might become a regular item on the chess calendar.                                                       

Results: (All points out of 16) 1st Torquay Boys’ Grammar School “A” 12½ pts. 2nd TBGS “B” 12. 3rd Clyst Vale Community College 11½. 4th= Devonport High School; Great Torrington School “B”; TBGS “C” & TBGS “D” all 9½. 8th= St. Boniface’s  Catholic College, Plymouth “A”; Great Torrington School “A” & Millfield School “A” all 9. 11th Dawlish Community College “A” 8½. 12th Millfield School “B” 8. 13th= Shebbear College & St. Boniface’s Catholic College, “B” 7½. 5th= Coombeshead Academy, Newton Abbot “A”; Great Torrington School “C”; St. Cuthbert Mayne School, Torquay “A” 7. 18th= Coombeshead Academy, “B”; Dawlish  Community College “B” & Great Torrington School “D” 6. 21st St. Cuthbert Mayne School “B” 4½.

The death was announced this week of the West of England’s Life Vice President, Frank Kingdon at the age of 85. He first appeared on the westcountry chess scene in 1962, when he became Secretary of the Dorset C.C.A. and their delegate to W.E.C.U. This was his introduction to chess organisation, going on to fill a number of posts in Dorset and the Westcountry.

He was a founding member of the chess club at the Winfrith Atomic Energy Establishment in 1962, and 2 years later started the Dorset Congress at Winfrith, before transferring it to Weymouth.   Although a naturalised Dorset man, Frank was born in Plymouth in 1929 before moving to Exeter in 1932. He attended Hele’s School in Exeter before starting his national service in 1947 with REME where he trained on servicing computers, which in those days were often as a big as a house. After being demobbed he became a pioneering atomic scientist, working first at Harwell and later transferring to Winfrith, a UK Atomic Energy Authority site, near Dorchester, which opened in 1958 and was used for nuclear reactor research until 1995.The funeral is on Friday 27th Feb. at St. Aldhelm’s Church, Spa Rd. Weymouth at 2 p.m.

Mrs. Baird’s Valentine’s Day problem was solved by 1.Qh6! threatening QxR mate. The only move to prevent this would be 1…Re3, but this cuts off the Black king’s only flight square after 2.Nxc6#.

In this game from last year, how did Black finish sharpishly?

Black to finish off quickly

Cornwall Beat Devon (14.02.2015.)

Cornwall met their only neighbours on Saturday in the annual Inter-County match, beating Devon by 8½-7½. This was their first victory over Devon in 23 years and only the third since 1973. Individual scores were as follows (Devon names 1st in each pairing)

1. D. Mackle 1-0 J. Menadue 2. J. Stephens 0-1 T. Slade. 3. S. Homer 0-1  M. Hassall 4. P. Sivrev 0-1 G. Healey 5. J. Wheeler 1-0 Csuri. 6. J. Fraser 1-0 D. Saqui 7. J. Underwood 1-0 R. Kneebone. 8. D. Regis 0-1 J. Hooker. 9. A. W. Brusey ½-½  S. Bartlett 10. B. W. Hewson ½-½ L. Retallick 11. M. Shaw 0-1 J. Wilman. 12. G. Body 0-1 G. Trudeau. 13. W. Ingham ½-½ J. Nicholas 14. T. F. Thynne ½-½ R. Smith. 15. M. Stinton-Brownbridge ½-½ M. Hill 16. I. S. Annetts 1-0 R. Stephens. Cornwall won 8½-7½.

2nd team (U-160): 1. K. P. Atkins ½-½ D. R. Jenkins. 2. C. J. Scott 0-1 N. Robinson 3. N. Butland 1-0 M. Richards. 4. P. Brooks ½-½ A. Barkhuysen. 5. J. Duckham ½-½ D. Lucas. 6. O. E. Wensley 1-0 D. Hutchinson. 7. A. Kinder 1-0 M. Jones. 8. W. Taylor 0-1 I. Renshaw. 9. V. Ramesh 1-0 J. Rodrigo. 10. R. Wilby 0-1 B. Childs. 11. N. Hodge 1-0 R. Pascoe. 12. N. Bacon ½-½ A. Slade. Devon won 7-5.

This was the second game to finish and seemed to galvanise the other Cornish players to a great collective effort. It contains what Jeremy Menadue called “what they used to call a gold coins on the board moment”. Notes kindly supplied by Menadue and the winner. 

White: M. Shaw (173) Black: John Wilman (150).

King’s Indian Defence [A48]

1.d4 Nf6 2.Nf3 c5 3.c3 b6 4.Bf4 g6 5.e3 Bg7 6.Nbd2 A London system. 6…cxd4 7.exd4 0–0 8.Bd3 Bb7 A quiet start. 9.Nc4 Rather committal. 9.Qe2; 9.0–0. 9…d6 10.0–0 Nh5 A typical plan against the London. 11.Bg5 h6 12.Bd2 b5 13.Ne3 this looks a great square for the knight. 13…Qd7 14.Nh4? Decentralising and weakening the d4 square. Better might have been 14.Qb3 with a double attack on g6 and b5. 14…Nf4 covering the g6 weakness. 15.Bc2 e5 16.Ng4 White seems to be building up pressure on Black’s king. 16…h5 17.Ne3 Qh3!! That gold coins moment! 18.Nf3 Nxg2 The combinations play themselves. 19.Ng5 19.d5 Nf4. 19…Nf4! a memorable move. 20.Re1 White has to play 20.d5 but it’s not nice. If 20.Nxh3 Nxh3#. 20…Qh4 The queen knows when it’s not wanted. 21.Nf3 Nh3+ 22.Kf1 Of course this is wrong but other king moves also lose. e.g. 22.Kg2 Ng5; 22.Kh1 Nxf2+ 23.Kg1 wins. White resigned before Black could play Qxf2 mate. 0-1.

Dr. Jago’s problem last week was solved by 1.Qh3! If 1…Kxd5 or 1…Pe1=Q then 2.Qd3 mates. If Pe1=N to protect d3 then 2.Be6 is also mate.

As today is St. Valentine’s Day here is an appropriate 2-mover from the darling of the problem composers a century ago, Devon’s own Edith Baird. Can you see how the four islands of pieces spell out the word LOVE?

White to mate in 2.