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Archive for the ‘Western Morning News’ Category

Not the WMN (08.11.2014) 813

The Chipping Sodbury RapidPlay was held recently at the Old Grammar School. The winners were as follows:

Open Section: 1st James Cobb (228) Bristol& Clifton 5/6 pts. 2nd= Chris Beaumont (214) Bristol & Clifton & Jerry Humphries Downend & Fishponds 4½.

Major Section (U-155): 1st= Andrew Munn (150) & David Tipper (143) both Downend & Fishponds, and David Dugdale (151) Thornbury all 4½.

Minor Section: Dorota Pacion (117) S. Bristol 5½. 2nd=  Jack Walpole (90) & Richard Port (113)  both University and Kevin Langmaid (112) Yate & Sodbury all 4 pts. Dorota Pacian was the only female player in the tournament.

While the 15th Beacon Seniors tournament was played out during the week, the World Seniors Championship was due to finish on Wednesday at Katerini, Greece. Millionaire chess player, Terry Chapman, had organised a team of four English players, himself incuded, to have a concerted effort for one of them to win the title.

This was the 8th round game between two of the contingent.

White: Keith Arkell (2450). Black: Mark Hebden (2540).

King’s Indian Defence [E62]

1.Nf3 Nf6 2.c4 g6 3.Nc3 Bg7 4.d4 0–0 5.g3 d6 6.Bg2 Nc6 7.0–0 Rb8 8.b3 a6 9.Nd5 Nh5 10.Bb2 e6 11.Nc3 b5 12.d5 Ne7 13.dxe6 fxe6 14.c5 dxc5 15.Qc2 Nc6 16.Rad1 Nd4 17.Nxd4 cxd4 18.e3 e5 19.exd4 exd4 20.Nd5 d3 21.Qc1 Bf5 22.Bxg7 Nxg7 23.Qxc7 Qxc7 24.Nxc7 White has now won a pawn and has a distinct advantage considering Black’s isolated pawn and inferior piece placement. 24…a5 25.Nd5 Rf7 26.Ne3 Rd7 27.Rd2 a4 28.Nxf5 Nxf5 29.Rfd1 axb3 30.axb3 Black must lose at least one of his 2 queenside pawns. 30…Rbd8 31.Bc6 Rd4 32.Bxb5 Now the other must fall as well. 32…g5 33.Rxd3 Kg7 34.Kg2 R8d6 35.Rxd4 Nxd4 36.Bc4 Kf6 37.b4 Ke5 38.Re1+ Kf6 39.b5 Nf5 40.Rb1 Rb6 41.Bd3 Nd6 42.Rb4 h6 43.h4 Nf7 44.Ra4 Ke5 45.hxg5 hxg5 46.Ra6 Rb8 47.Rg6 Kd4 48.Be2 Ke5 49.Bc4 1–0. Now Black’s last pawn must go, leaving him in a hopeless position. Arkell won again in the next round, putting him in the joint lead with 2 games to play, and Hebden and Nunn just behind. The chances of having an English World Seniors Champion look good.

In last week’s miniature problem White wins by 1.Qg7! from where it can go to either a7 or a1 to give mate, depending on which way the Black king goes.

This position comes at the end of a blitz game earlier this year. White is 2 pawns down but might have winning chances; if only he had more than a few seconds to think about it…

White to play and win.

Not the Western Morning News! 1st Nov. 2014 (812)

As you might have realised by now, Western Morning News has, as from 1st November 2014, been forced to cut in half the Westcountry Life supplement in its Saturday edition, and with it has gone the chess column. They are due to monitor the situation in January, when further decisions will be made on future developments. In the meantime, the editorial staff will welcome views on the future of the column. Letters should be addressed to:- The Editor, Western Morning News, 3rd Floor, Studio 5-11. Millbay Road, Plymouth PL1 3LF.  During that interim period, I’ll be posting a weekly column in the WMN slot on this website, even though it will not appear in the paper itself.  The code number (812) refers to the number of columns I’ve written since starting about 17 years ago. If the WMN column is not restored in January, I may have to reconsider.

So, here goes……

The new President of the English Chess Federation is Dominic Lawson, former Editor of the Sunday Telegraph, son of former Chancellor of the Exchequer, Nigel Lawson and brother to Nigella. He is a strong and active player who is likely to use his professional contacts to raise the profile of the game in the national consciousness. To this end he has, all this week, been involved in a second series on Radio 4 in which, while playing a game with them, he talks to a number of diverse public figures for whom chess has played a part in their lives. On Monday it was the World Champion Magnus Carlsen and on Thursday it was Sol Campbell, former Arsenal and England footballer. He did a 1st series earlier this year which included boxing champion Lennox Lewis. All ten broadcasts will remain available on the BBC website for at least a year.

By way of introduction, writing in the Radio Times, Lawson links this with the film The Imitation Game, shortly due for UK release, with Benedict Cumberbatch in the part of the mathematician Alan Turing. It concentrates on Turing’s work at Bletchley Park cracking the “unbreakable” Nazi codes, where his line managers included British Chess Champion Hugh Alexander and Sir Stuart Milner-Barry.

Turing was not in their league as a player but left an even greater legacy to the chess world when, in 1952, he developed the first chess program, which he called “Turochamp”. It took half an hour to execute the instructions for each move but it worked, and 45 years later its direct descendant “Deeper Blue” defeated Kasparov himself.

This begs the question as to whether the silicon algorithms have taken over and are killing human creativity. While there is no substitute for human vs human competition, the best players will always be those that harness the computer to help develop their innate skills; to be its master rather than its slave.

Here is the 1997 game in which a computer defeats a world champion in a match for the first time.

White: Deeper Blue. Black G. Kasparov Caro-Kann Defence – Steinitz Var. [B17]

1.e4 c6 2.d4 d5 3.Nc3 dxe4 4.Nxe4 Nd7 5.Ng5 Ngf6 6.Bd3 e6 7.N1f3 h6?? The blunder that sealed the human’s fate as it allows a known winning sacrifice 8.Nxe6! Qe7 9.0–0 fxe6 10.Bg6+ Kd8 11.Bf4 b5 12.a4 Bb7 13.Re1 Nd5 14.Bg3 Kc8 15.axb5 cxb5 16.Qd3 Bc6 17.Bf5 exf5 18.Rxe7 Bxe7 19.c4 1–0

Last week’s short game ended with 1.Bxf7+ Should Black take the bishop and try to hang on – or not? Black chooses the former 1…Kxf7?? 2.Ng5+ Ke8 and 3.Ne6 traps the queen, a move that Black clearly overlooked. But even if 1…Kf8 2.Ng5 Ndf6 3.Bb3 Nh6 etc. his position is a mess.

In this position from 1882, how does White win in two moves?

White to play and mate in 2

WMN Chess Column Suspended (November 2014)

Newspapers all over the country, if not the whole world, are struggling to adapt to the challenges brought about by the new media – multiple channels of 24 hour rolling news - twitface – etc. etc.  Added to that, the printed media’s lifeblood, advertising income, has been depressed throughout the banking and general financial crisis of recent years.

The Western Morning News cannot be immune to these factors, and must adapt to survive. One thing it has done is to sell off its award-winning flagship offices, built in the shape of a galleon, and move to premises near the docks.  Another idea was the addition of a Sunday edition. However, circulation figures are not as predicted, as folk are probably already locked in to their favourite Sunday titles, and loth to either switch or add another paper to the already heavy bundle the paper boy delivers. But the experiment was committed until the end of January 2015 when it will be assessed. Until then, economies have to be made and the cutting in half of the Westcountry Life supplement on a Saturday is one of them.

With it went the chess column.  That is the reason it has not appeared since October. In answer to the several enquirers I’ve already had, I am not too ill to write, or dead – far from it. Not yet, anyway.

The WMN chess column is one of the oldest provincial columns in the country. It started in 1891 under the editorship of Carslake Winter-Wood, writing under the nom de plume “Queen’s Knight”, in contrast to the contemporary Exeter columnist “King’s Knight”.  In March 1906 the column switched to the Illustrated Western Weeky News.   A. R. Cooper ran it from 1927 – 1939. Writing in the March 1939 issue of Chess, the eminent problemist, C. S. Kipping, observed that “the three British columns which have international reputations for their composing tourneys are (1) the Grantham Journal,  (2) the Falkirk Herald and (3) the Western Morning News”. After the war it was taken on by former British Champion, R. J. Broadbent (1948 & 1950) but it was mostly devoted to problems. That is, until the arrival from Lichfield of J. E. Jones in 1956, who took the paper to task and insisted there should be real local news, so a chess column appeared twice a week, one by Broadbest and a new one by Jones (no relation).

However, Jones ran his column on the same lines as Howard Staunton ran his, a century earlier – that is, as a pulpit  from which he would admonish any chess official who could not live up to his own high standards. In 1963 Jones moved away and when Ken Bloodworth took over he was quietly advised to keep it all low key. Which, of course, he did for the next 35 years. When he was approaching his late 80s, he wished to retire, but was keen that there should be no break to give the management an opportunity to end the sequence, and he recommended me to them, and the switch was smoothly made. I have now written 812 weekly columns.

There is now a hiatus until the end of January 2015 when further decisions will be made. If you wish to convey your personal opinion on the future of the column, I’m sure the decision-makers would listen attentively. 

Their address is: Western Morning News, Studio 5-11,  Millbay Road, Plymouth. PL1 3LF.

Chipping Sodbury RapidPlay Results (8th Nov. 2014) 813

The Chipping Sodbury RapidPlay was held recently at the Old Grammar School. The winners were as follows:

Open Section: 1st James Cobb (228) Bristol& Clifton 5/6 pts. 2nd= Chris Beaumont (214) Bristol & Clifton & Jerry Humphries Downend & Fishponds 4½.

Major Section (U-155): 1st= Andrew Munn (150) & David Tipper (143) both Downend & Fishponds, and David Dugdale (151) Thornbury all 4½.

Minor Section: Dorota Pacion (117) S. Bristol 5½. 2nd=  Jack Walpole (90) & Richard Port (113)  both University and Kevin Langmaid (112) Yate & Sodbury all 4 pts. Dorota Pacian was the only female player in the tournament.

While the 15th Beacon Seniors tournament was played out during the week, the World Seniors Championship was due to finish on Wednesday at Katerini, Greece. Millionaire chess player, Terry Chapman, had organised a team of four English players, himself incuded, to have a concerted effort for one of them to win the title.

This was the 8th round game between two of the contingent.

White: Keith Arkell (2450). Black: Mark Hebden (2540).

King’s Indian Defence [E62]

1.Nf3 Nf6 2.c4 g6 3.Nc3 Bg7 4.d4 0–0 5.g3 d6 6.Bg2 Nc6 7.0–0 Rb8 8.b3 a6 9.Nd5 Nh5 10.Bb2 e6 11.Nc3 b5 12.d5 Ne7 13.dxe6 fxe6 14.c5 dxc5 15.Qc2 Nc6 16.Rad1 Nd4 17.Nxd4 cxd4 18.e3 e5 19.exd4 exd4 20.Nd5 d3 21.Qc1 Bf5 22.Bxg7 Nxg7 23.Qxc7 Qxc7 24.Nxc7 White has now won a pawn and has a distinct advantage considering Black’s isolated pawn and inferior piece placement. 24…a5 25.Nd5 Rf7 26.Ne3 Rd7 27.Rd2 a4 28.Nxf5 Nxf5 29.Rfd1 axb3 30.axb3 Black must lose at least one of his 2 queenside pawns. 30…Rbd8 31.Bc6 Rd4 32.Bxb5 Now the other must fall as well. 32…g5 33.Rxd3 Kg7 34.Kg2 R8d6 35.Rxd4 Nxd4 36.Bc4 Kf6 37.b4 Ke5 38.Re1+ Kf6 39.b5 Nf5 40.Rb1 Rb6 41.Bd3 Nd6 42.Rb4 h6 43.h4 Nf7 44.Ra4 Ke5 45.hxg5 hxg5 46.Ra6 Rb8 47.Rg6 Kd4 48.Be2 Ke5 49.Bc4 1–0. Now Black’s last pawn must go, leaving him in a hopeless position. Arkell won again in the next round, putting him in the joint lead with 2 games to play, and Hebden and Nunn just behind. The chances of having an English World Seniors Champion look good.

In last week’s miniature problem White wins by 1.Qg7! from where it can go to either a7 or a1 to give mate, depending on which way the Black king goes.

This position comes at the end of a blitz game earlier this year. White is 2 pawns down but might have winning chances; if only he had more than a few seconds to think about it…

White to mate in 2

Lawson on Legacies (01.11.14.)

The new President of the English Chess Federation is Dominic Lawson, former Editor of the Sunday Telegraph, son of former Chancellor of the Exchequer, Nigel Lawson and brother to Nigella. He is a strong and active player who is likely to use his professional contacts to raise the profile of the game in the national consciousness. To this end he has, all this week, been involved in a second series on Radio 4 in which, while playing a game with them, he talks to a number of diverse public figures for whom chess has played a part in their lives. On Monday it was the World Champion Magnus Carlsen and on Thursday it was Sol Campbell, former Arsenal and England footballer. He did a 1st series earlier this year which included boxing champion Lennox Lewis. All ten broadcasts will remain available on the BBC website for at least a year.

By way of introduction, writing in the Radio Times, Lawson links this with the film The Imitation Game, shortly due for UK release, with Benedict Cumberbatch in the part of the mathematician Alan Turing. It concentrates on Turing’s work at Bletchley Park cracking the “unbreakable” Nazi codes, where his line managers included British Chess Champion Hugh Alexander and Sir Stuart Milner-Barry.

Turing was not in their league as a player but left an even greater legacy to the chess world when, in 1952, he developed the first chess program, which he called “Turochamp”. It took half an hour to execute the instructions for each move but it worked, and 45 years later its direct descendant “Deeper Blue” defeated Kasparov himself.

This begs the question as to whether the silicon algorithms have taken over and are killing human creativity. While there is no substitute for human vs human competition, the best players will always be those that harness the computer to help develop their innate skills; to be its master rather than its slave.

Here is the 1997 game in which a computer defeats a world champion in a match for the first time.

White: Deeper Blue. Black G. Kasparov Caro-Kann Defence – Steinitz Var. [B17]

1.e4 c6 2.d4 d5 3.Nc3 dxe4 4.Nxe4 Nd7 5.Ng5 Ngf6 6.Bd3 e6 7.N1f3 h6?? The blunder that sealed the human’s fate as it allows a known winning sacrifice 8.Nxe6! Qe7 9.0–0 fxe6 10.Bg6+ Kd8 11.Bf4 b5 12.a4 Bb7 13.Re1 Nd5 14.Bg3 Kc8 15.axb5 cxb5 16.Qd3 Bc6 17.Bf5 exf5 18.Rxe7 Bxe7 19.c4 1–0

Last week’s short game ended with 1.Bxf7+ Should Black take the bishop and try to hang on – or not? Black chooses the former 1…Kxf7?? 2.Ng5+ Ke8 and 3.Ne6 traps the queen, a move that Black clearly overlooked. But even if 1…Kf8 2.Ng5 Ndf6 3.Bb3 Nh6 etc. his position is a mess.

In this position from 1882, how does White win in two moves?

White to mate in 2

Bude RapidPlay Results (25.10.2014.)

All westcountry congresses depend on small groups of volunteers, who take a quiet satisfaction in running a successful event that gives pleasure to the players.

The latest of these was the 1st Bude Rapidplay Congress organised recently by John and Christine Constable. The entry was small but strong – 16 players with an average grade of 153. 1st J. Rudd (Barnstaple – 231) 6/6 pts. 2nd J. Byrne (Taunton – 165) 5 pts. 3rd G. Trudeau (Liskeard – 155) 4 pts. 4th= G. Body (Exeter – 167); T. Slade (Bude – 164) & R. Nash (Barnstaple – 124) all 3½. 7th= S. Homer (Exeter – 200); M. Richardt (Taunton – 187); D. J. Jenkins (Camborne – 132) & S. Woolgar (Bristol – 132) all 3. 11th C. Sellwood (Camborne – 158) 2½. 12th= D. R. Jenkins (Liskeard – 126); S. Bartlett (Newquay – 165) & B. Childs (Lerryn – 106) all 2. 15th= P. May (114) & M. Jones (Newquay – 121) 1.

Longer-established events need their organising committee refreshed from time to time, otherwise they risk withering on the vine. The East Devon Congress, for example, is on the brink of collapse as the committee has dwindled to two, Sean Pope and Mark Abbott, who are already highly committed with their daytime professions. They need fresh blood coming in from the Exeter region to share the load and keep it afloat, as it’s a bigger event, with a larger venue. Prospective volunteers should contact Sean on 01392-436420 or e-mail: sean.pope1@blueyonder.co.uk.

Meanwhile, here is a win by a great supporter of the Exeter Congress.

White: J. F. Wheeler Black: J. Duckham.

Benko Gambit  [A57]

1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 c5 3.d5 b5 The signature move of the Benko Gambit in which Black offers a pawn in order to open up space in which his queenside pieces can operate freely. 4.cxb5 a6 5.b6 White doesn’t wish to fall in with Black’s plans. 5…g6 6.Nc3 Bg7 7.e4 d6 8.Nf3 Nbd7 9.Be2 0–0 10.0–0 Nxb6 11.h3 Bb7 12.Bf4 Nfd7 13.Qd2 f5? Leaving a big hole at the heart of his position. 14.Ng5 fxe4 15.Ne6 Qe8 16.Nxf8 Qxf8 17.Bg4 Ne5 18.Be6+ Kh8 19.Bg3 Nbc4 20.Qe2 Bc8 21.Bxc8 Rxc8 22.Bxe5 Nxe5 23.Qxe4 c4 24.Rab1 Nd3 25.Nd1 Ne5 26.Ne3 Rc5 27.Rfc1 Qc8 28.f4 Nd3 29.Rxc4 Nxb2 30.Rxc5 Qxc5 31.Qxe7 h6 32.Kh2 Qd4 33.Rf1 Nd3 34.g3 Qb2+ 35.Ng2 Qf6 White would be delighted to simplify out, leaving him still materially ahead. 36.Qxf6 Bxf6 1–0

Last week’s problem was solved by 1.Ra1! and when Black checks on h8 2.Bg8 not only blocks that check but allows the rook on a1 to administer mate at the same time.

This is not a beginners’ game but from this year’s British Championship. Four moves each have been played and now it is White to move.

White to play and win quickly

Glos. vs Devon Results (18.10.2014.)

Gloucestershire met Devon on Saturday at West Buckland in Rd. 1 of the 2014 – ‘15 Inter-County competition. It was a well-contested contest, although in the end Devon forced a comfortable enough 12-4 win, mainly due to their greater strength in the bottom half of the team.

This was also the debut for former presenter of TV science programmes, Adam Hart-Davis, who is now a regular at the Plymouth Chess Club.

Here are the details, with Gloucestershire names first in each pairing and grades in brackets.

1.J. Stewart (207) 0-1 D. Mackle (203). 2. P. J. Meade (182) 0-1 J. K. Stephens (194). 3. N. K. Hosken (181) ½- ½ S. J. Homer (188). 4. M. J. Ashworth (181) ½- ½ P. Sivrev (187). 5. J. Jenkins (176) 1-0 J. Wheeler (181). 6. P. J. Kirby (173) ½- ½ J. Underwood (179). 7. P. Dodwell (163) 0-1 D. Regis (176). 8. B. Whitelaw (159) 0-1 A. W. Brusey (176). 9. R. M. Ashworth (151) 0-1 B. W. Hewson (174). 10. A. Richards (136) ½- ½ W. Ingham (176). 11. A. N. Walker (134) ½- ½ M. Shaw (170) 12. P. Baker (132) 0-1 G. Body (169). 13 K. Bendall (131) ½- ½ M. Stinton-Brownbridge (164). 14. J. Caterer (128) 0-1 I. S. Annetts (162) 15. P. Bending (122) 0-1 A. Hart-Davis (161). 16. J. B. Harris (115) 0-1 C. J. Scott (157).

Here is a game with notes based on those kindly supplied by the winner.

White: Jim Caterer (128). Black: Ivor Annetts (162).

Caro-Kann – Exchange Variation [B13]

1.e4 c6 2.d4 d5 3.exd5 cxd5 4.Bd3 Nc6 5.c3 Qc7 6.Ne2 If 6.Nf3 then 6…Bg4 is a little more problematic. 6…Bg4 7.f3 Bd7 8.Bf4 e5 9.dxe5 Nxe5 So far, but no further, all was known to Black from the 2002 game Gonzalez v Sasikiran. 10.Bc2 Bd6 11.0–0 Ne7 12.Nd4 h5 13.Ba4 0–0–0 Now the race is on to start a telling attack against the enemy king. White starts well in this respect. 14.Bxd7+ Rxd7 15.b4 Kb8 16.a4 N7g6 17.Bg3 h4 18.Nb5 Qc6 19.Qd4 b6 If 19…hxg3 20.Qxa7+ Kc8 21.Qa8+ Bb8 22.Na7+ That’s as far as Black got with his analysis. It seems to win the Black queen but White’s own queen can become trapped in the corner – or worse e.g. 24…Ba7+ 25.Kh1 Rxh2 mate. 24…Ba7+ 25.Qxa7 Nxa7 and Black is a piece for a pawn to the good! 20.Bf2 h3 21.Nxd6 hxg2 22.Kxg2 Rxh2+ 23.Kg3 If 23.Kxh2 Nxf3+ 24.Kg2 Nxd4 25.Bg3 Black was mildly worried about this move but all lines are good for him. 23…Rh4 24.Qxh4 Nxh4 25.Kxh4 Qxd6 Black was thinking his opponent would not pin the knight with Bg3 because it would be mate. And yet…. 26.Bg3?? Qh6# 0–1

Last week’s position was ended after 1.Qxa7+! RxQ 2.RxR+ Kb4 3.Ra4 mate.

Here is another hitherto unpublished 2-mover by Dave Howard.

White to mate in 2

Death of Brian Clapp (11.10.2014.)

The death in Cheltenham of Brian William Clapp at the age of 87 was reported last week. Brian was a regular member of the Exeter Club in the 1960s and ‘70s, having been club champion in 1963, ’68, ’69 and ’71. He was a lecturer in Economic History at Exeter University and published several books, notably Manchester Merchants 1850 – 1939 (1956), John Owens – Manchester Merchant (1965), The University of Exeter – A History (1982) and An Environmental History of Britain Since the Industrial Revolution (1994 – Longman).

In this 1966 game he took full advantage of some loose play by a much stronger opponent. 21 year old Richard Hall from Bradford was reading law and went on to become a district judge in 1998 and British Correspondence Chess Champion and a Grandmaster of postal chess. It is taken from Dr. Dave Regis’ excellent book 100-Odd Years of Exeter Chess Club.

White:  B. W. Clapp. Black: R. V. M. Hall.

Sicilian Defence – Paulsen Var.  [B45]

1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 e6 5.Nc3 Nf6 6.Be3 Bb4 7.Bd3 d5 8.Nxc6 bxc6 9.e5 d4 10.exf6 dxe3 11.Qf3 Bxc3+ 12.bxc3 exf2+ 13.Qxf2 Qxf6 14.Qc5 preventing castling. 14…Rb8 15.Rd1 Qe7? 16.Qe5 Hitting rook and g-pawn. 16…Rb2 17.Qxg7 Qf8?? 18.Qf6 Bd7 19.Be4 Rb6 20.Qd4 Qh6 21.Qxd7+ Kf8 22.Qd6+ Kg8 22…Kg7 is no better. 23.Qg3+ 1–0 Black resigned as he could see what was to follow i.e. 23…Kf8 24.Rd8+ Ke7 25.Qc7+ Kf6 26.0–0+ and mate must follow very shortly.

The 49th Dorset Congress takes place on the weekend commencing Friday 24th October (contact: Ian Clark on 01202-536370 or e-mail dorset@bournemouthchesscongress.org.uk). If you can only spare one day that weekend there’s the Chipping Sodbury Rapidplay on the Saturday; (Contact: Graham Mill-Wilson on 07790-187-415 or e-mail tugmw@blueyonder.co.uk. Then there’s the Royal Beacon Seniors Congress in Exmouth starting on Monday 3rd November (Contact: R. H. Jones on 01395-0223340 or e-mail: jones_r53@sky.com.)

The solution to last week’s problem by A. C. White involving pawn promotion was 1.Qc4! threatening 2.Pc8=N mate, and Black’s capture with the rook to prevent this, merely allows 2.g8=N mate.

This position arose in a game earlier this year. White is the exchange and a pawn down, but can win by force. How did he do it?

White to mate by force

Dilleigh Wins Bristol Summer Congress (04.10.2014.)

The 1st Bristol Summer Congress was held on Aug 22nd-24th and the section winners were as follows: Open: 1st S. Dilleigh. Major (U-155): 1st A. Papier. Minor (U-125): 1st Nikhil Hakeem – at 9 yrs old Nikhil is clearly one to watch.

Here is Dilleigh’s fine Rd. 3 win against a stronger opponent.

White: Ryszard Maciol (215). Black: Steve Dilleigh (182)

Queen’s Gambit – Exchange Var. [D36]

1.d4 d5 2.c4 e6 3.Nc3 Nf6 4.Bg5 Nbd7 5.cxd5 exd5 6.e3 c6 7.Bd3 Be7 8.Nge2 Nh5 9.Bxe7 Qxe7 10.Qc2 g6 11.0–0–0 Nb6 12.Kb1 Ng7 13.e4 dxe4 14.Bxe4 Black has to decide whether to risk castling on the kingside and inviting a pawn storm. However, if he castles long, White threatens to break open the centre with d5. 14…0–0 15.Nf4 Qf6 16.g3 Ne6 17.Nce2 Ng5 18.Bd3 Bg4 19.h3 Bf3 20.Rhf1 Rad8 21.h4 Ne6 22.Nxe6 Qxe6 23.Rd2 Qf6 24.Qc3 Rfe8 25.h5 White pushed on with his attack, but Black is able to create counter threats. 25…Nd5 26.Qb3 Qg5 27.Rc2 Qxh5 28.Nc3 Nxc3+ 29.Qxc3 Qg4 30.Rd2 Qxd4 Black is able to grab another pawn to open up the central files, while White’s pieces are not well co-ordinated. 31.Qxd4 Rxd4 32.Kc2 Red8 33.Re1 Bg4 preparing for the killer blow. 34.Kc3 Bf5 0–1 White can avoid losing a piece, with 35.Re8+ Rxe8 36.Kxd4 Rd8+ 37.Ke3 Rxd3+ 38.Rxd3 Bxd3 39.Kxd3. but is left a pawn down on both wings.

The solution to last week’s problem was the waiting move 1.Qh8! and wherever the king moves to 2.Qd4 or 2.Bf5 are mates.

In Alain C. White’s 1912 book, The Theory of Pawn Promotion, he talks about the evolution of the concept of what should happen to a pawn if it manages to get to the opposite side of the board, before assembling a collection of about 500 problems based on this idea. He writes “The origin of the Promotion of Pawns is buried beyond recovery in the past. Evidently, since pawns can only march ‘breast forward’, as Browning would have described it, something startling must happen when they reach the opposite end of the board. Several possibilities could be imagined. They might turn round and walk back again. They might be compelled to walk straight off the board in a novel form of self-annihilation. But this would be a penalty for their prowess instead of a reward. Their transfiguration is a most ingenious and appropriate solution to the difficulty.” He goes on to describe the gradual modification in the promotion rules, from queen-only, to any piece that has already been captured, to the present state of any piece, regardless of the earlier course of the game.

One of the given examples is this, his own 2-mover.

White to mate in 2

Seniors’ Chess (27.09.2014.)

People tending to live longer these days and often retiring early has helped to create one of the expanding areas of sport. Tennis and golf, for example, have long had their seniors circuits, in which past champions compete at a far more leisurely pace than in their heyday.

So too with chess, which has recently introduced European and World individual and team events for seniors only. This year, the world governing body, FIDE, has gone further, by splitting the age eligibility into two sections, 50 – 64 and 65+, thus enabling more players to compete for honours. The first European Championship for the 50 – 64 age group was held earlier this year in Portugal and was won by Paignton resident Grandmaster, Keith Arkell.

The Royal Beacon Seniors event in Exmouth was a pioneer in this aspect of the game. When it started in 2000 it was the only seniors-only event in Britain, and they introduced a special section for the 50-somethings over a decade ago. Now the world has caught up.

The 15th Royal Beacon Seniors event takes place during the week starting Monday 3rd Nov. Entry forms are downloadable from chessdevon.com.

Here is a game from last year’s Beacon Seniors Congress.

White: Ian Heppell (178). Black: Jonathan Wells (180)

Sicilian Defence – Alapin Variation. [B22]

1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 e6 3.c3 Nf6 4.e5 Nd5 5.d4 cxd4 6.cxd4 b6 7.Nc3 Bb7 8.Bd3 Be7 9.0–0 0–0 10.Re1 f5 11.exf6 Black has a choice of 4 pieces with which to retake, but chooses probably the least promising option as it weakens his defensive pawn structure, which White exploits later. 11…gxf6 12.Bh6 Rf7 13.Qe2 Nxc3 14.bxc3 Qc7 15.Be4 Nc6 16.d5 Nd8 If 16…exd5 17.Bxd5 winning the rook. 17.Rad1 f5 18.Bb1 Bd6 Now White’s kingside attack gets going. 19.Ng5 Bxh2+ 20.Kh1 Re7 21.Qh5 Bf4 22.Bxf5 Black’s d-pawn is pinned. 22…Qxc3 Best in the circumstances. 23.Bxh7+ Kh8 If 23…Rxh7 24.Qe8 mate. 24.Qg6 threatening 25.Qg8 mate and Black has to give up the exchange in order to avoid it. 24…Nf7 25.Nxf7+ Rxf7 26.Qxf7 Bxh6 27.Be4 1-0 Black’s only move is 27…Qg7 but after 28.Qxg7+ Bxg7 29.dxe6 Bxe4 30.Rxe4 dxe6 31.Rxe6

Heinz Herschmann, a regular at the Beacon Seniors event and well-known composer, arranger, musician and founder of the music label Apollo Sound, recently died, peacefully at home at the age of 90. As a composer, he achieved considerable acclaim receiving many commissions and in his other work he enjoyed great success in roles as varied as musical director of touring shows, to accompanist to various entertainers.

The solution to Dave Howard’s 3-mover last week was 1.Qh1! and the queen will mate on either a8 or b7.

This 2-mover is similar.

White to mate in 2

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