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Archive for May 30th, 2015

Frome Congress Prizewinners. (30.05.2015.)

The Frome Congress was held successfully recently with the following emerging as winners: Open Section:

1st= Matthew Turner (Millfield) &
Gediminas Sarakauskas (Guildford)

(4½/5). 3rd= Jane Richmond (Brown Jack), Jeremy Fallowfield (Stourbridge), Stephen Whatley (Millfield) & Allan Pleasants (Weymouth) 3½. British Championship Qualifying Places went to Fallowfield, Jeremy Menadue (Truro) & Sam Gower (South Bristol), who also got a grading prize.  

Major (U-165): 1st= M. Wilson (Torquay), A. Rossiter (Bristol Cabot), P. Jackson (Coulsdon) all 4. U-146 Grading Prizes: S. Williams (Cwmbran). Intermediate (U-140): 1st C. Snook-Lumb (Clevedon) 4½. 2nd= K. Osborne (Lewes), D. Agostinelli (Southampton), R. Rowland (London) all 4. Grading Prize U-129: A. Sage (Bath). Minor (U-115): 1st M. Cockerton (Torquay) 4½. 2nd= G. Ford (Salisbury), C. Gardiner (Falmouth), I. Stringer (Yeovil), M. Davidson (Wimbourne) & J. Macdonald (Kings Head) all 4. Grading Prizes: U-105: B. Childs (Lerryn). U-91: M. Watson (Taunton). The highest-placed Somerset players were as follows: Open: M. Turner. Major: A. Gregory (Bath). Intermediate: C. Snook-Lumb. Minor: Ivan Stringer.

Team Prizes: Millfield: (T. & E. Goldie, Whatley & French) & Yeovil 2. (A. Footner, R. Knight, T. & A.  Alsop).

Games from the event were not available at the press deadline, but here is a sample of the 37 year old Latvian’s play from the 2012 London Classic.

White: Gediminas Sarakauskas (2408). Black: Arianne Caoili (2202).

Ruy Lopez – Chigorin Defence. [C96]

1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 a6 4.Ba4 Nf6 5.0–0 Be7 Taking the proffered e-pawn generally leads to an open game in which Black can get into a tangle trying to hang on to his extra pawn. 6.Re1 b5 7.Bb3 d6 8.c3 0–0 9.h3 Na5 10.Bc2 c5 This constitutes the Chigorin Defence.11.d4 White’s almost automatic response. 11…Nd7 12.dxc5 dxc5 13.Nbd2 Qc7 14.Nf1 Rd8 15.Ne3 Nb6 16.Nd5 Nxd5 17.exd5 f6 18.Nh4 Facing the threat of Qd3, Black continues 18…g6 With all Black’s pieces tied up on the opposite wing, White can afford the luxury of a sacrifice to break open the king’s defences. 19.Nxg6 hxg6 20.Bxg6 Nc4 21.Qh5 Bf8 22.Re4 Ra7 23.a4 Nd6 24.Rh4 Qg7 25.axb5 Nxb5 26.c4 Nd4 27.Ra3 Ne2+ 28.Qxe2 Qxg6 29.Rg3 Qxg3 30.fxg3 Rh7 With this particular configuration of Black’s pieces, White can afford to exchange. 31.Rxh7 Kxh7 32.Qh5+ Kg8 33.Qg6+ 1–0 After 33…Kh8 34.Bh6. Little better is 33…Bg7 34.Bh6 Rd7 35.Qe8+.

The solution to last week’s problem was 1.Bg5! after which Black has 6 possible moves, each one met with a mate administered by White’s queen.

This position arose in the recent Devon vs Notts match, Steve Hunter (W) vs Mark Abbott (Devon). Black’s king is very constricted, and White played Nd5+ seeing several good reasons why that would hasten the end after the king moves. It did that, all right, but can you see how?