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Archive for March 7th, 2015

Bristol & Exeter Congress Results (07.03.2015.)

The 40th East Devon Congress finished on Sunday after a successful weekend. The prizewinners were as follows (all scores out of 5).

Open Section: 1st= Jack Rudd (Barnstaple) & Dominic Mackle (Newton Abbot) both 4½. 3rd Lorenz Hartmann (Exeter) 4. Grading prizes: U-181: 1st= Alan Brusey; (Teignmouth); Dave Littlejohns (Taunton) & Mark Abbott  (Exmouth) all                   3½. U-169: 1st= Robert Wright (Bridport) & Jamie Morgan (Penwith) both 3.

Major (U-155) 1st John Nyman (King’s Head) 4½. 2nd= Ben Franklin (Battersea) & Neville Senior (Sedgemoor) both 4. GP (U-148) 1st= John Morrison (Tiverton) & Rob Wilby (Plymouth) both 3½. GP U-133 Lynne Fursman 3.

Minor (U-125) 1st Joy Fursman 4½. 2nd= Reece Whittington (Exeter); Nicky Bacon (Sidmouth); Mark Cockerton (Torquay) & Terence Greenaway (Torquay) all 4.            GP 102-110 James Wallman                          4         40.00

GP (U-102) Terry Dengler (Truro) 3.

Bristol’s Winter Congress was held the weekend before. The winner of the Open was Patryk Krzyzanowski, and he got the British Championship qualifying place.  2nd= were Peter Kirby, Stephan Meek, Lewis Martin, Matthew Payne and Alistair Hill.  Major Section: 1st S. Williams 4½/5. 2nd T. Chinnick 4/5.

Hill missed out on 1st prize at Exeter by virtue of losing to Jack Rudd in the final round. Here he loses to a sharp attack in Rd. 2 at Bristol.
White: A. Hill (199). Black: Matthew Payne (189).

King’s Indian Defence – Petrosian Variation. [E92]

1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 g6 3.Nc3 Bg7 4.e4 d6 5.Nf3 0–0 6.Be2 e5 7.d5 Petrosian’s move in this classical position. a5 8.Bg5 Qe8 9.Nd2 h6 10.Be3 Na6 11.0–0 Nh7 12.a3 f5 13.f3 Bd7 14.b3 f4 15.Bf2 g5 16.b4 b6 17.Qb3 Kh8 18.c5 dxc5 19.bxa5 bxa5 20.Bxa6 Rxa6 21.Bxc5 Rf7 22.Rab1 Bf8 23.Qc4 Rg6 24.Bxf8 Nxf8 25.Rb7 c6 26.Rfb1 g4 Black’s pawns storm ahead backed by bishop and rooks. 27.fxg4 Bxg4 28.dxc6 Be6 29.Qc5 f3 30.Qxe5+ Kg8 31.Rxf7 Rxg2+ 31…Qxf7 is the obvious move, but the text has the same effect. 32.Kh1 Qxf7 33.Nf1 Qa7 Threatening mate on g1 34.Ng3 Allows White’s rook to defend the kingside, but it’s not enough. 34…Rxh2+! 34…Qf2 will still win but is much slower. 35.Nh5 Rg5 36.Qxg5+ hxg5 37.Rg1. 35.Kxh2 Qf2+ 36.Kh1 Qg2# 0–1.

In last week’s problem, Alice wondered what her sister could possibly mean by referring back to her French lessons. She was, of course, alluding to the French phrase used in chess of “en passant”. If Black’s c-pawn could move to b3 it would indeed be mate, and the only way it can do that is to take White’s c-pawn en passant, which means White’s previous move must have been Pb2-b4.

This position is taken from a book chapter entitled “Simple but not easy”. Jack Rudd of Barnstaple is White and his next move contains enough threats to win the game.

White to play and win

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