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Paignton Congress Results (16.09.2017.)

The Paignton Congress finished last week with 61 cash prizes totalling £4,500, being awarded – too many to name all the winners here, though they are all on the keverelchess website. Here is a summary of the main winners.

Premier: 1st= Keith Arkell (Paignton) & Richard Bates (Hackney). 3rd Mike Waddington (Dorchester). Challengers (U-180) 1st K. Simpson (Mansfield). 2nd= Chris Lowe (Exeter); Robert Stern; Paul Jackson; Paul Jackson & Alex Rossiter (Bristol). Intermediate (U-150) 1st Ivor Annetts (Tiverton); 2nd= Terry Greenaway (Torquay) & Geoff Harrison (Gosforth). Minor (U-120) 1st= Tim Allen & Paul Errington. 3rd= Alan Davies (South Hams)  & Tim Crouch. 5 Round Morning sections. U-180 1st Roger Hutchings. U-135 1st Paul Doherty.

This game from the last round of the Morning tournament attracted a crowd during its fast finish. Notes based on those kindly supplied by the winner.

White: Martin Keeve. Black: Brian Gosling (E. Budleigh).

Dutch Defence [A85]

1.d4 e6 2.c4 f5 The Dutch Defence, a regular choice against 1.d4 in the 19th century, and still a sound tool in Black’s armoury. 3.Nc3 Nf6 4.Nf3 Bb4 5.g3 b6 6.Bg2 Bxc3+ 7.bxc3 Bb7 8.Ba3 Preventing castling pro tem. 8…Ne4 Attacking the doubled pawns. 9.Qb3 Nc6 10.Bb4 a5 11.Ba3 a4 12.Qc2 Na5 13.c5 Nc4 Black is establishing a strong centre. 14.Bb4 bxc5 15.dxc5 Bd5 Black is planning to block White’s dark-square bishop out of the game, but must first take care of his own bishop. 16.Rd1 c6 17.0–0 0–0 18.Nd4 Qg5 After some successful jousting on the queenside, Black turns his attention to the other wing where the rest of the game will be played out. 19.e3 Rf6 20.Qe2 Rg6 21.f4 Qf6 21…Nxg3 is probably better but more complicated and with time running out was rejected. 22.Bxe4 fxe4 23.f5 exf5 24.Rxf5 Qh4 25.Qf2 Qg4 26.Rf1 Threatening mate on f8. 26…h6 27.Rf4 Qg5 28.Kh1? White now offered a draw, which Black declined as he could foresee the strength of his next move. 28…Ne5! 29.Rf5 Qe7? Better was 29…Ng4 30.Qf4 Qxf4 31.R5xf4 Nxe3. 30.Qf4 Nd3 31.Qc7 Bxa2 Black takes time out to snaffle a pawn and  create a passed pawn. 32.Qb7 Re8 33.Qa7 Bb3 34.Kg2 34.Ba5 is the only chance for White. 34…Kh7 35.h3? White falters in severe time trouble. 35.Kg1 is better. 35…Qh4 36.g4 Rxg4+ Black can afford to play this, knowing he has a draw by repetition in hand. 37.hxg4 Qxg4+ 38.Kh2 Qh4+ 39.Kg2 Be6 winning the rook which has nowhere to go. 40.Qc7 Bxf5 41.Rxf5 And now the last rites are acted out. 41…Ne1+ 42.Kf1 Nd3 43.Qxd7 Only seconds to go, and White seeks counter-play, but it’s too little too late. 43…Qh1+ Forcing 44.Ke2 Qe1#.

In last week’s position from a game at Paignton White played 1.Na6+! giving Black the unwelcome choice of taking the knight or moving his king, but neither is good enough. If 1…PxN 2.Qb3+ and mates next move, or 1…Ka8 then 2.Nxc7+ wins the queen.

Here’s a position from Hall vs Brusey Exmouth 2007. White to play and win.

White to play and win by force

Paignton Congress 2017 – Complete Prizelist

Here is the final prizelist of this year’s event, which totals nearly £4,500. The 0/2 prize is also called the Slow Starter prize, which was introduced to encourage those who have started the event disastrously, and to whom the prospect of an early return home might be coming increasingly attractive. It gives them something still to play for, instead of messing up the draw by withdrawing.

Arkell’s short Rd. 3 draw against his nearest rival, Richard Bates was, perhaps, predictable, but to be be fair he’d made 172 moves in his previous 2 games and, in any case, he was feeling (and looking) quite tired after a long series of back-to-back tournaments, taking in Dundee, Cardiff and Qatar, to name but three. And who wouldn’t.

Congratulations to all these winners.

Paignton  Congress  –  3rd – 9th September 2017
PRIZELIST
Premier
1st= Keith Arkell 2415 Halesowen £350
Richard Bates 2387 Hackney £350
3rd Mike Waddington 2080 Dorchester £200
4th= David Anderton 2093 Walsall Kipping 4 £33
Kevin Goater 2102 Weymouth 4 £33
Ashley Stewart 2127 Royston 4 £33
GP John Fraser 1870 Exeter University 4 £50
0/2 Ivan Myall 2000 Chelmsford 3 £20
Challengers (U-180)
1st Kevin Simpson 152 Mansfield 6 £300
2nd= Chris Lowe 176 Exeter 5 £75
Robert Stern 163 Albany 5 £75
Paul Jackson 162 Coulsdon 5 £75
Alex Rossiter 161 Bristol Cabot 5 £75
GP Yasser Tello 162 Wimbledon 4 £20
U-163 Colin Sellwood 155 Camborne 4 £20
U-154 Martin Page 152 Insurance £20
Jim Robertson 129 East Kilbride £20
0/2 Tim Spanton 169 Hastings £20
Intermediate (U-150)
1st Ivor Annetts 144 Tiverton £300
2nd= Terry Greenaway 141 Torquay 5 £150
Geoff Harrison 133 Gosforth 5 £150
GP Paul Doherty 126 Bolton 4 £10
U-132 Jeremy Brooks 121 Hampstead 4 £10
Gerald Parfett 119 Athenaeum 4 £10
0/2 Mark Stone 121 Pettswood 3 £20
Minor (U-120)
1st= Tim Allen 112 Battersea £250
Paul Errington 119 Bournemouth £250
3rd= Alan Davies 92 South Hams 5 £50
Tim Crouch 116 King’s Head 5 £50
GP Caroline Robson 105 Barnet 4 £30
GP George Phillips 96 B.C.A. 4 £15
U-98 Peter Carrick 96 Mid-Norton 4 £15
0/2 Reg Cox 84 Southampton 3 £10
Philip Gordon 119 B.C.A. 3 £10
5 Rd. Morning Sections
Boniface (U-180)
1st Roger Hutchings 174 Woodpushers £300
2nd= Richard Webster 175 Calderdale 4 £75
Clive Walley 164 Bath 4 £75
Alex Rossiter 161 Bristol Cabot 4 £75
Brian Gosling 154 East Budleigh 4 £75
GP Russell Goodfellow 159 Tunbridge Wells 3 £7.50
U-162 Alan Brusey 158 Newton Abbot 3 £7.50
Raymond Gamble 153 Derby 3 £7.50
Martin Keeve 161 Dresden 3 £7.50
U-146 John Shaddick 136 Basingstoke 3 £30
Thynne (U-135)
1st Paul Doherty 126 Bolton £300
2nd Tim Crouch 116 Kings Head 4 £200
3rd= David McGeeney 134 Bristol Cabot £33
Joseph Farrell 130 Metropolitan £33
Norbert Simmon 132 München £33
GP Stevo Ilic 101 Cowley £6
U-119 Clifford Peach 106 S. Hams £6
Barry Miles 115 Coulsdon £6
Graham Mill-Wilson 104 Plymouth £6
Susan Fraser 111 Darlington £6
0/2 Ken Ashby 97 S. Hams 2 £20
Richard Nash Blitz
1st John Fraser 5 £25
2nd Keith Arkell 4 £15
3rd= John Mercy 3 £2.50
David Costelow 3 £2.50
Kevin Goater 3 £2.50
Nigel Dennis 3 £2.50
Total prize money £4,458

Paignton Congress Rds. 3 & 4

Norman Tidy makes a move against Congress Organiser for many years, Alan Crickmore.

Rd. 4: Hazel Welch and Christine Constable both in deep thought.

Roger Waters (W) takes on Tony Tatam, who's enjoying the opportunity to swap the role of arbiter for that of player for a change.

Paignton Congress Hits The Road Again (06.09.2017.)

The venerable Paignton Congress got off to another start, but this time amid foul weather; a howling gale sweeping in from over Tor Bay bringing drenching rain – not your typical start to Paignton, it has to be said. It’s usually a fine week weatherwise, with the hotel gounds full of players soaking up the last rays of summer sun,  earnestly analysing or just chatting with friends. There won’t be much of that this week, but fortunately the hotel has room and facilities enough to cope with that.

The entry lists have a familiar look about them; players know what they like and come back year after year, but with a liberal enough sprinkling of  newcomers to maintain interest. Keith Arkell’s here, of course, defending his impressive 25 year record; familiar ground for him as he only lives down the road, and quite a change from his having just become the World’s Bughouse Chess Champion in Dubai, with his Bughouse partner and fellow Devonian, Jack Rudd. That must be some kind of record. If you don’t know what Bughouse Chess is, don’t ask – I’ll come back to it later.

Keith has Richard Bates as his nearest rival, who may be taking heart from the struggles Arkell has had in his early games. In round 1 his game lasted 102 moves and nearly filled 2 complete scoresheets, while his next game took a mere 70 moves to wear down Graham Bolt. On the other hand, these marathons seem to be meat & drink to him; he’s content to sit at the board, motionless and fully focussed for hour after hour, and that’s an important quality in a top player – they all have it. No fidgets, fussing, watching other games – just the occasional break to get a breath of fresh air to clear his head, then back to the board.

DCCA President, Paul Brooks, welcomes everyone before Rd. 1 begins.

Arkell & Daniel Rosen get their 102 move marathon under way. Next to Arkell is David Anderton, making a rare appearance at the event.

Rd. 2 and another mini-marathon ensues, this time involving Graham Bolt.

Arthur Hibbert vs former Paigntonian Chris Lowe on top board of the Challengers.

General view of the playing area #1

General view from a different angle at the same moment.

British Championships Start Today (29.07.2017.) 944

The British Championships start this afternoon at 2.30 at the new venue of Llandudno. All games can be followed as they are played by going to the event website britishchesschampionships.co.uk/live-games-2017.

David Howell is top seed, but will have to meet some strong opposition in the shape of former champions Gawain Jones and Jonathan Hawkins, and the too-rarely seen Luke McShane.  A safer bet for a 1st prize would be Grandmaster John Nunn who is streets ahead of his 29 co-entrants in the 50+ Seniors section, both in experience and current strength.

Here is a recent game of his from the 50+ section of the World Senior Teams Championship in May.

White: M. Adams. Black: J. D. M. Nunn.

Sicilian Defence – Najdorf Variation.

1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.d4 Nf6 4.Nc3 cxd4 5.Nxd4 a6 6.h3 e5 7.Nde2 h5 8.Bg5 Be6 It should be noted that John’s opponent here is not former World Championship finalist Michael Adams, but Mark Adams of Wales – a different proposition,  and playing someone of Nunn’s calibre, White will be keen to get as much material off the board as soon as possible, in the hope this will simplify matters. However, it rarely does in cases like this, as the GMs are experts in “keeping it simple”. 9.Bxf6 Qxf6 10.Nd5 Qd8 11.Nec3 g6 12.a4 Nc6 13.Bd3 Bh6 14.0–0 0–0 15.Qe1 Rc8 16.f4? Probably not the best plan as it’s Black that eventually benefits from this opening up of the kingside. exf4 17.Nxf4 Ne5 18.Nxe6 fxe6 19.Rxf8+ Qxf8 20.Qe2 White is hoping to bring his rook to f1 to complete his piece development and attack the queen, but Nunn is a move ahead of this plan. 20…Qf4 21.Qf2 Qg5 22.Kh1 Rf8 It’s Black that grabs the f-file. Now all Black’s pieces are focussed on the kingside, while most of White’s are on the queenside.  23.Qd4 Ng4 24.Nd1 If 24.hxg4 Qh4+ 25.Kg1 Bf4 with several mating lines. You could work them out. 24…Qd2 25.Qc3 Qf4 threatening mate on h2, so forces… 26.hxg4 From now on, Nunn uses the open lines for his pieces to maximum effect. 26…Bg7 27.Qe1 Be5 Again threatening mate on h2. 28.g3 Qxg4 29.Kg2 Qf3+ 30.Kh3 Qg4+ 31.Kg2 Rf3 0-1 The final straw, as Black has everything focussed of the isolated g-pawn. White may be a piece up, but they are powerless. White’s least worst option would have been 32.Qf2 Rxf2+ 33.Kxf2 Qxg3+ 34.Ke2 and Black would presumably push his 2 passed pawns.

No sooner has “the British” finished than the Paignton Congress will be not be far away, taking place during the week starting Sunday 3rd September. Entries can be done online at dccapaigntonchess.com or postally via the entry form.

In last week’s position, White could win by force after 1.Qg8+! KxQ (if 1.RxQ Nf7 mate). 2.Ne7+ Kf8 (if 2…Kh8 3.Nf7 mate) 3.N7g6+ PxN. 4.NxP mate.

This week, White’s queen is under attack, so to where should he move it for best results?

Queen attacked - what to do?