Search Keverel Chess
Monthly Archive

Posts Tagged ‘Frome Congress 2016’

Frome Congress 2016 Results

The Frome Congress finished on Sunday evening with the following prizewinners (all points out of 5).

Open: 1st David Buckley (Bath) 4½. 2nd= Tim Kett (Cardiff), Matthew Payne (Bath) & Jane Richmond – 4. Although there were no Grandmasters involved this year in this section it was all the more competitive for it, with a record entry of 42.

Major Section (U-165): 1st= Brendon O’Gorman; James Forster (Southbourne); Tim Woodward (Trowbridge) & Lynda Roberts (Thornbury), all 4 pts.

Intermediate (U-140): 1st= Robin Morris-Weston (Reading) & Hugo Fowler (Glastonbury) both 4½.

Minor (U-110): 1st= Alastair Drummond (Bristol) & Bill Read (Witney ) both 4½. 3rd= Georgina Headlong (Swindon), Robert Skeen (Churchill Academy) & Alan Fraser (Beckenham).

The Frome event is now able to award more than one Qualifying Place for the British Championship to be held in Bournemouth in the summer, and places were awarded to David Onley (Combined Services); Scott Crockart (Didcot) & George Crockart (Bristol). This may be the first time in chess history that a father and son have both qualified in this way at the same event.

Going in to the final round of the Open, Kett was the clear leader on a perfect 4 points, followed by Buckley in clear 2nd place a half point behind. Kett had White and only needed to draw to be certain of 1st place, but his opponent had other ideas.

White: T. Kett (198). Black: D. Buckley. (212)

French Defence [C11]

1.e4 e6 2.d4 d5 3.Nc3 Nf6 4.e5 Nfd7 5.f4 c5 6.Nf3 Nc6 7.Be3 The Boleslavsky Variation. 7…Be7 8.Qd2 0–0 9.dxc5 Bxc5 10.Bxc5 Nxc5 11.0–0–0 By castling on the opposite side to Black, White is choosing to live dangerously. 11…Qa5 12.Kb1 Bd7 13.Bd3 Rac8 14.f5 exf5 15.Nxd5 Qxd2 16.Rxd2 Rfe8 17.Re1 Be6 18.Nf4 Nxd3 19.cxd3 If 19.Rxd3 Nb4 attacking both a- & c-pawns; or 19.Nxd3 Bd5. 19…Nb4 20.Nxe6 fxe6 21.a3 Nd5 22.Rc1 Rxc1+ 23.Kxc1 Rc8+ 24.Kb1 Kf7 25.Ng5+ Ke7 26.Nxh7 White may feel the need to attack Black’s 3-2 kingside pawn majority, but this merely reduces it to 2–1 – an even more potent threat. 26…Rh8 27.Ng5 Rxh2 28.Nf3 Rh6 29.Rc2 Kd7 30.Nd4 Rh1+ 31.Ka2 Rd1 32.Nb3 b6 Not 32…Rxd3?? 33.Nc5+. 33.Nd4 Rxd3 34.Nc6 Nc3+ 35.Kb3 Kxc6 36.Kc4 Rd5 37.bxc3 Rxe5 continuing to hack down White’s pawns 38.Rd2 Rd5 39.Re2 e5 40.g4 f4 White has run out of all meaningful counterplay. 0–1

In last week’s position, White won after 1.Nd7+! and if 1…Ka8 2.Rc5 threatening Ra5 mate, or if Black takes the knight there’s Rc8 mate. If 1…RxN 2. RxR and White is the exchange and 2 pawns up, easily enough to win in the longer run.

In this top class game from last year, Black seems to be well set for an attack, but White spots a flaw in the position. White to play and force immediate resignation.

Find White's winning move.

Frome Congress Approaches (07.05.2016.)

The ever-popular Frome Congress starts next Friday evening at the Selwood Academy. Last year’s winner was Grandmaster Matthew Turner, chess master at Millfield School, where he looks after a number of highly-promising juniors who are there on a chess scholarship. This was his last round game against another former West of England Champion, Jane Richmond (née Garwell), the only lady to have won the title, and many times Welsh Ladies Champion.

White: Matthew Turner (2478). Black: Jane Richmond (2086).

English Opening  [A25]

1.c4 e5 The Sicilian Variation, so called because the pawns now resemble a Sicilian Defence, but with colours reversed. It is reckoned to offer Black the best chances of active counter-play. 2.g3 Nc6 3.Bg2 g6 4.Nc3 Bg7 5.e3 d6 6.Nge2 h5 7.h3 Nh6 8.e4 Be6 9.d3 Qd7 10.Nd5 Nd8 11.Bg5 Ng8 12.Qd2 Black proceeds to push White back using pawn advances. 12…c6 13.Ndc3 f6 14.Be3 f5 15.b3 h4 She doesn’t intend to lie back and get run over, but will the pawn-pushing at the expense of natural piece development backfire at some point? 16.exf5 gxf5 17.d4 Ne7 18.0–0–0 Qc7 19.d5 cxd5 20.Nxd5 Nxd5 21.Bxd5 Rc8 22.Nc3 Qa5 23.Kb1 Bxd5 24.Nxd5 Qxd2 25.Bxd2 Nc6 26.g4 Kf7 27.gxf5 Nd4 28.f6 Bxf6 29.Nxf6 Kxf6 30.Bc3 Ne2 31.Rxd6+ Kf5 32.Kc2 Rcd8 33.Bxe5 Rxd6 Or 33…Kxe5 34.Rxd8 Rxd8 35.Re1 winning the piece back. 34.Bxd6 In a relatively open position like this, a bishop is often a little stronger than a knight and with a 2 pawn deficit the writing is on the wall for Black. 34…Ke4 35.f4 Kf3 36.f5 Ng3 37.Rd1 Rh6 38.Bf8 Ra6 39.Rd7 Nxf5 40.Rxb7 Ke4 Or 40…Rxa2+ 41.Kd3 Kf4 42.c5 and the c-pawn can run forward supported by the rook & bishop. 41.a4 Rf6 42.Bc5 1–0.

The Cornish Championship finished in a tie between James Hooker (Truro) and David Saqui (Camborne) on 4/5 points, although on tie-break Hooker retained his championship title and the Emigrant Cup.

The recent Teignmouth Rapidplay Congress finished as follows: Open: 1st= Dominic Mackle (Newton Abbot) & Jonathan Bourne (Swindon). Grading Prizes: U-172 – Peter Jaskiwskyj & Mark Littleton (Wimborne). U-160: Matthew Wilson (Teignmouth). U-150: John Bowley (Wimborne). Juniors U-16 – Felix Schulte.

Minor Section: 1st= Alan Dean,           Martin Worrall (Taunton) & Duncan McArthur. Grading Prizes: U-122 – Nigel Dicker (Glastonbury). U-100 Martin Maber (Taunton). Juniors U-16 : Joshua Blackmore (Newton Abbot) & Reece Whittington (Exeter Juniors). Juniors U-14: Nick Cunliffe & Kenneth Greenshields both Somerset.

Three weeks today sees the start of the 48th Cotswold Congress in their new home of the King’s School, Gloucester. Full details may be found on their own website cotswoldcongress.co.uk.

This position arose just before the end of a game last December. Black to move.

Black to move and win