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Posts Tagged ‘Cornwall’

Devon vs Cornwall (08.12.2012.)

Devon beat Cornwall 12-8 at sunny Saltash on Saturday. The details were (Devon names first): 1.D. Mackle 1-0 J. F. S. Menadue. 2.J. K. Stephens ½-½ M. Hassall. 3. S. Homer 1-0 L. Retallack. 4. J. F. Wheeler ½-½ S. Bartlett. 5.K. J. Hurst 1-0 J. Willman. 6. B. W. R. Hewson ½-½ G. Trudeau. 7.A. W. Brusey ½-½ C. Sellwood. 8. O. E. Wensley ½-½ J. Nicholas. 9. J. Leung 1-0 D. J. Jenkins. 10. M. Shaw ½-½ M. Hill. 11. B. G. Gosling ½-½ R. Smith. 12.A. Kinder ½-½ C. Long. 13. N. Rahimili 1-0 D. R. Jenkins. 14. T. F. Thynne 1–0 A. Barkhuysen. 15. W. Ingham 1-0 P. Spargo. 16.P. Brooks 1-0 D. Lucas.

The top game was this, with notes based on those by the winner.

White: D. Mackle (202). Black: J. F. S. Menadue (187).

Queen’s Gambit – Slave Defence – Alapin Variation. [D15]

1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.Nc3 dxc4 5.e4 b5 White has gambited a pawn in return for extra space for his pieces. 6.e5 Nd5 7.a4 e6 8.Ng5 h6 9.Nge4 b4 10.Nb1 Qh4 11.Qf3 Ba6 12.Nbd2 c3 13.Nc4 Bxc4 14.Bxc4 cxb2 15.Bxb2 Nd7 16.a5 f5 17.exf6 N7xf6 18.Bd3 Kd7 Black decides to keep his king in the centre as he plans a kingside attack. White accepts the challenge and goes for a queenside counter. 19.0–0 Nxe4 20.Bxe4 Bd6 21.g3 Qf6 22.Qd3 a6 23.Rfc1 h5 24.Rc2 h4 25.Rac1 hxg3 26.hxg3 Rhc8 27.Qb3 Ra7 28.Qa4 Rac7 29.Bd3 Qf3 30.Be2 Qe4 31.Qb3 Rh8 32.Bf3 Qf5 33.Bg2 g5 34.Qc4 Ra8 There now follows some toing & froing as the time control at move 40 looms. 35.Re2 Rcc8 36.Rce1 Re8 37.Rc2 Rec8 38.Qe2 Re8 39.Rec1 Rec8 40.Re1 Re8 With an extra 20 minutes thinking time now available, White can afford to work out the details of his attack. 41.Bf3 Rac8 42.Bg4 Qg6 43.Rcc1 Re7 44.Qxa6 the final assault. 44…Nf6 45.Rxe6 Rxe6 46.Bxe6+ Kxe6 47.Qxc8+ Nd7 48.d5+ cxd5 49.Re1+ 1-0 as the king must abandon his knight. 49…Be5 doesn’t work after 50.Rxe5+ nor 49…Kf7 50.Qxd7+ Kf8 51.Qd8+ Kf7 52.Qe8#.

Meanwhile, Somerset beat Dorset 10½-5½ at Bradford Abbas, while Hants lead Glos 8-7 with one disputed result to be settled. More details next week.

The solution to Christopher Reeve’s problem was 1.Nd8! after which Black has four tries, all of which fail; viz (a) 1…BxR 2.BxB#;  (b) 1…PxN 2.QxP# (c) 1…BxB 2.QxQP# and (d) 1…PxP 2.QxQP#.

This position is taken from an early Paignton Congress game – T. H. Tylor vs F. E. A. Kitto. Black (to move) has sacrificed a rook in pressing his attack. Was it worth the price?

Can Black win in spite of his material deficit?

Devon’s UK Chess Challenge Results.

Cornwall’s champion club this year is Truro who won their Division 1, the County Shield, by a considerable margin. Their pool of players comprised Jeremy Menadue, Robin Kneebone, Chris Reeves and Marks Hassall and Pilling. Runners-up were Camborne.

Div. 2, the Roberts Cup (U-164) was won by Falmouth, who also won Div. 3 for Under-135s.

Devon’s club champions this year were Newton Abbot who retained the Bremridge Cup, while Exmouth retained the Mamhead Cup (Div. 2).

Devon’s contribution to the world’s largest chess tournament, the British Land UK Chess Challenge which attracts over 75,000 young players annually, was completed on Saturday with the county final at Churston Grammar School.

The boys’ title of Supremo was conferred on the following:-

U-7: Chris Kiddey (Ilsham). U-8: James Lloyd (Kelly College Prep.). U-9: Josh Parton (Broadclyst).

U-10: Thomas Kolya (Broadclyst).

U-11: Taylor Finch (Exeter Juniors). U-12: Tomas Trott (Clyst Vale C.C.). U-13: John Fraser (Torquay Boys’ G.S.). U-14: Jared Wray (Torquay Boys’ G.S.) U-18: Oliver Bell (Ilfracombe Arts College).

The girls’ title of Suprema was won by the following:- U-8: Olivia Whidley (Ilsham). U-9: Hannah Burnett. U-10: Ella Bibby. U-11: Becky Trott (all Broadclyst  Primary School). Becky Trott and Josh Parton were the only two to score a maximum 6/6 points.

Here is a game from the recent Frome Congress, won by WECU’s qualifier for next month’s British Championship in Sheffield.

White: P. Krzyzanowski (177). Black F. J. Musson (157)

Queen’s Gambit – Slav Defence.

1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.cxd5 cxd5 4.Nf3 Nf6 5.Nc3 Nc6 6.Bf4 Bf5 7.e3 e6 8.Bb5 Nd7 It makes better sense to continue with normal development and prepare for castling e.g. 8…Bb4. 9.Qa4 Qb6 10.Ne5 Ndxe5 11.Bxe5 f6 12.Bg3 Be7 13.Rc1 0–0 14.0–0 a6 15.Bxc6 bxc6 16.Qb3 Qxb3 17.axb3 Black now tries to eliminate his backward pawn, but this only sets him on a slippery slope. 17…c5 18.dxc5 Bxc5 19.Nxd5! Rfc8 20.Nc7 hitting rook and bishop. 20…Rxc7 Black has no choice but to give up the exchange. 21.Bxc7 Bb4 22.Rfd1 Ra7 23.Rc4 Rb7 24.e4 Bg4 25.f3 Bh5 26.Rd8+ Kf7 27.g4 Bg6 28.h4 h5 29.Rh8 threatening to win the trapped bishop. 29…hxg4 30.h5 Bxe4 31.fxe4 e5 32.Rb8 Forcing off the rooks and leaving White a whole rook up, so Black resigned. 1–0

In last week’s position, 1.d3 allows to move his bishop while preparing for 2.Qc4 mate.

This 2-mover was taken from the recent inaugural British Junior Chess Problem Solving Championship, won by 16 year old Peter Lalic, whose parents are both Grandmasters.

White to mate in 2

Death of Roger Grime (16.04.2011.)

Cornish chess has lost one of its great servants with the death last week of Roger Grime at the age of 58. He was born and lived all his life in Helston, attending the Grammar School between 1963-70, eventually qualifying as an accountant. He soon became the backbone of Helston’s Godolphin Chess Club, where he was Secretary and 1st team captain for over 35 years. As one of Cornwall’s top players he regularly took a top board in county matches, missing only a handful of matches in all that time. He became county champion in 1975, before the advent of Peter Clarke, Michael Adams and Andrew Greet, and was C.C.C.A. Treasurer for 30 years.

Here is one of his wins from the match against Somerset in 2000.

White: Mike Twyble (204). Black: Roger Grime (164).

Queen’s Gambit – Exchange Variation [D35]

1.d4 d5 2.c4 e6 3.Nc3 Nf6 4.Bg5 Be7 5.cxd5 exd5 6.e3 0–0 7.Bd3 h6 8.Bh4 Be6 9.Nge2 c6 10.Qc2 Nbd7 11.0–0 Nh5 12.Bxe7 Qxe7 13.b4 a6 14.a4 b5 15.e4 Qxb4 16.exd5 cxd5 17.axb5 axb5 18.Rab1 Qe7 19.Rxb5 Rac8 20.Qd2 Qd6 21.Ra1 f5 22.Rba5 g5 23.Ra6 Qe7 24.Bc2 Nhf6 25.f3 Ne8 26.Bb3 Ndf6 27.Ra7 Rc7 28.Rxc7 Qxc7 29.Qe3 Ng7 30.Qe5 Qxe5 31.dxe5 Nd7 32.Nd4 Rb8 33.Ra7 Nc5 34.Bxd5 Bxd5 35.Nxd5 White is ready to press home an attack using his well-placed pieces and extra pawn. However, Black has plans of his own. 5…Rb1+ 36.Kf2 Nd3+ The time control at move 40 is getting close and the players must move quickly, increasing the possibility of oversights. 37.Kg3?? Oops! Essential was 37.Ke3 after which might follow Nxe5 38.Ne7+ Kf8 39.Ndxf5 Nxf5+ 40.Nxf5 Re1+ 41.Kf2 Nd3+ 42.Kg3 Re6. 37…Nh5+ resigns, in view of the inevitable 38.Kh3 Nf2 mate.

The Teignmouth RapidPlay attracted over 100 entries last Saturday, and the winners included the following:-

Open: 1st Patryk Krzyzanowski (Yeovil). 2nd Allan Pleasants (Weymouth). U-145: 1st D. Macarthur (Keynsham). 2nd G. Rosser (Torquay). Juniors: 1st= Theo Slade (Bude); Tom Kolya & Reece Whittington (both Broadclyst).

The 62nd West of England Championship starts on Friday morning at the Royal Beacon Hotel, Exmouth, but it’s not too late to take part as entries, in common with most local events, are lower this year. Details are available from Andrew Footner on 01935-873610 or e-mail – andrew.footner@gmail.com.

In last week’s position, Black wins after 1…Rxh3+. If 2.gxh3 Bxf3 mate, and if 2.Bh2 then Rxh2+ with a winning attack.

This position was the end of the last game ever played in the WECU Championship by former Champion Ron Bruce. He has just played the seemingly obvious Rxg2, but this lets White off the hook. White to play and draw.

White to play and draw.

New Cornish Champion! (09.04.2011.)

It can be dispiriting when one spends over 40 years trying to win something, only to finish runner-up time after time. One could be excused for thinking fate had decreed it was never to be.

That was the case with the President of the Cornish Chess Association, Robin Kneebone, but just when he least expected it, he won his county championship at their annual congress at Stithians last weekend. He entered the fifth and final round of the Emigrant Cup a half point behind the leader, Lloyd Retallick, and needed a win with the black pieces in order to become Champion. Here is that game; (notes based on those by the winner.)

White: L. Retallick (181). Black: R. Kneebone (167).

Modern Benoni Defence [A70]

1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 c5 3.d5 e6 4.Nc3 exd5 5.cxd5 d6 6.e4 Black is left with a backward pawn against White’s strong pawn centre. 6…g6 7.Nf3 Bg7 8.h3 0–0 9.Bd3 Nh5 10.0–0 Nd7 11.Bg5 Bf6 12.Be3 Re8 A better plan is to continue with piece development while Black’s queenside is still constricted. 13.Nd2  a better plan might be 13.Qd2 a6 14.a4 Rb8 15.Rac1. 13…a6 13…Bg5 14.f4 Bh4 15.g4 Ng7 16.Nf3 14.a4 Bg5!? 15.f4 Bh4 16.Nf3 Too cautious: although needing just a draw White should play 16.g4! Ng7 17.a5 f5?! (17…Qe7) 18.Nc4 fxe4 19.Nxe4 Nf6. 16…Bg3 17.Qd2 Qe7 18.Ne2 Ndf6 Black rejected 18…f5 19.e5 dxe5 20.Nxg3 Nxg3 21.Rfe1 e4 22.d6 and the fork can easily be escaped from. 19.Nxg3 19.Nc3 Bf5 19…Nxg3 20.Rfe1 Nfxe4 winning a pawn. 21.Qc2 Bf5 Suddenly all Black’s pieces are free. 22.Bf2 Qf6 23.Bxg3 Nxg3 24.Bxf5 Qxf5 25.Qb3 Ne2+ winning a 2nd pawn. 26.Kf2 Nxf4 27.Rxe8+ Rxe8 28.Kg1 Re2 0-1 White resigned. The threat is on g2, and though White has a number of tries, none are good enough. e.g. 29.Nh4 Qf6 (or 29…Qg5 30.g3 Nxh3+ 31.Kh1 Nf2+ 32.Kg1 Re3 33.Kxf2 Qxg3+ 34.Kf1 Rxb3) 30.Qg3 Rxg2+ 31.Nxg2 Ne2+ 32.Kh2 Nxg3 33.Kxg3 Qe5+ 34.Kf3 Qxd5+.

And so Robin achieved his dream of winning the county title and the Emigrant Cup. Retallick and Jeremy Menadue were in joint 2nd place.

The Falmouth Cup for players graded U-140 was won by David Jenkins of Polruan on tie-break from Chris Reeves (Truro) and Gary Trudeau (Liskeard). David is a newcomer on the Cornish chess scene, but his modest grade of 118 will surely rise on this form.

The Penwith Cup, a one day event for juniors and inexperienced adult players, was won by 12-year old Jack Grose.

The solution to last week’s position was 1.Ra8 forcing a pawn move and then 2.Kb7 gives a discovered mate.

This position is the end of a game at the WECU Championships in Newquay in 1978, between two Bristolians; Alan Ashby (W) and David LeMoir. How did Black win in 2?

Black to win quickly

Devon v Dorset & Cornwall v Glos (23.10.2010.)

Both Devon and Cornwall were involved in their first matches of the new season at the weekend. At Luppitt, near Honiton, Devon II met Dorset where the Devon side had a distinctly new look as team captain, Brian Hewson, had been forced to draft in a number of new players; in fact, almost half the team were debutantes. Nor did they let the side down as the 7 “debs” notched up 5½ points, half the team total as Devon ran out comfortable 11-5 winners. Devon’s winners were: Oliver Demerger; John Gorodi; Alex Billings; Peter Halmkin; Jeff Leung; Ken Alexander, Freddie Sugden and Tony Tatam. Draws were secured by Messrs Howard, Gosling, Clarke, Kennedy, Stinton-Brownbridge and Jones.

Meanwhile, at Exminster, near Exeter, Cornwall were fielding a slimmed-down team of 12 players against Gloucestershire instead of the more usual 16, due to their increasing difficulty in finding county-strength players prepared to travel the long distances involved. The result was two fairly evenly-matched teams who finished 6-6. Cornwall’s individual victors were Ian George; Gary Trudeau and Dave Lucas.

Here is a sharp win by Freddie Sugden, a pupil at Torquay Boys Grammar School and one of the Devon Debs.

White: M. Fielding (109). Black: F. Sugden (127).

King’s Indian Defence – Classical Variation [E90].

1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 g6 3.Nc3 Bg7 4.e4 d6 5.Nf3 0–0 6.Be3 e5 7.d5 Nbd7 8.Be2 Ne8 9.Ng5 a5 If now 9…f5 as he was probably planning 10.Ne6 10.0–0 Nc5 11.Na4 h6 12.Nxc5 dxc5 13.Nf3 b6 14.Qd2 Kh7 15.Ne1 Nd6 16.Bd3 f5 now he can play it 17.exf5 gxf5 18.f4 e4 19.Be2 Qf6 20.Rb1 Rg8 Black is now seizing open lines and diagonals as he prepares to attack. 21.Qd1 Ba6 22.b3 a4 23.Kh1 axb3 24.axb3 Bb7 25.Rg1 Ra2 26.g4 Qc3 attacking d3 27.Rg3 Bd4 adding to the pressure. 28.Bc1 e3 29.g5 Ne4 threatening Nf7+ 30.g6+ Even if White tries to defend f2 with 30.Rg2 White can simply continue with 30…Nf2+ 31.Rxf2 exf2 32.Nf3 Rxe2 33.Qxe2 Qc2 34.Qf1 (not 34.Qxc2?? f1=Q+) 34…Qe4 and Black’s attack is proving irresistible. 30…Rxg6 31.Rf3 Nf2+ 32.Rxf2 exf2 33.Nf3 33.Ng2 would have held things up for a few more moves, but the result is inevitable 33…Qxf3+ 34.Bxf3 Rg1+ and White resigned because of 35.Qxg1 fxg1=Q or R mate.

Last week’s pyramid-shaped problem was solved by 1.d6!, after which White can meet every one of Black’s tries with a different mate.

In this position, the pawn has been rushing forward in order to queen.

How should White now proceed to ensure a mate in 2?

White to mate in 2

Cornwall vs Gloucestershire (16.10.2010.)

While Devon II were playing Dorset at Luppit on Saturday (see previous blog report), Cornwall were playing Gloucestershire at Exminster and Ian George has kindly forwarded details. Cornwall is finding it increasingly difficult to get players to turn out for county matches in spite of the great  improvements recently made to the A30. The fact is that it’s 260 miles from Penzance to Gloucester, and 111 miles to Exeter, and one has to be very keen to undertake a 220 mile round trip for a single game. So this season, Cornwall have opted to field a slimmed-down team of 12 players instead of the usual 16. This match was played at Cornwall’s usual county match venue in Exminster, near Exeter.

The fact that the result was a 6-6 draw was mainly down to a stirling effort by the Cornish bottom 3 boards who scored 50% in spite of being heavily outgraded. Boards 1 – 9 were much more evenly matched and finished up all-square.

Bd

Cornwall

Grd

 

 

Gloucestershire

Grd

 1

J. Menadue

 185

 0

 1

   N. Hosken

185

 2

I. M. George

 184

 1

 0

  J. Jenkins

170

 3

L. Retallick

 181

 0

 1

  C. Mattos

170

 4

M. Hassall

 175

 ½

 ½

  P. J. Meade

164

 5

S. Bartlett

 162

 ½

 ½

  R. Dodwell

164

 6

M. Ferrie

 150

 ½

 ½

  G. Taylor

162

 7

C. Sellwood

 152

 ½

 ½

  A. Bentley

160

 8

G. Healey

 147

 ½

 ½

  D. Vaughan

159

 9

G. Trudeau

 143

 1

 0

  R. Craven

148

 10

C. Long

 122

 0

 1

  G. Brown

143

 11

P. Spargo

 111

 ½

 ½

  A. Richards

139

 12

D. Lucas

 108

 1

 0

  I. Blencowe

136

 

             Total

 

  6

  6

 

 

Devon beat Glos – Somerset beat Cornwall.

The final round of the WECU inter-county competition took place last Saturday. Devon beat Gloucestershire 10-6 and so regain the Harold Meek Cup (1st teams) to add to the Wayling Cup for the graded section that they had already secured. Devon’s winners were Dominic Mackle, John Wheeler, Mark Abbott, Ian Jamieson, Robert Thompson, Paul Brooks, Andrew Kinder and John Morrison. Draws were obtained by Marco Mattei, Alan Brusey, Stephen Schofield and Ivor Annetts.

Meanwhile, Cornwall were playing Somerset over 14 boards at Exminster. Team captain Anton Barkhuysen led the way with a win against a strong opponent, but only Colin Sellwood and Robin Kneebone could follow suite and they went down 4½-9½.

Here is one of Devon’s wins in which Black has to combine pressure and patience until the big chance presents itself.

White: O. Martin (145). Black: R. Thompson (170).

King’s Indian Defence [E94]

1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 g6 3.Nc3 Bg7 4.e4 d6 5.Nf3 0–0 6.Be2 Na6 7.0–0 e5 8.d5 Nc5 9.Nd2 a5 10.Rb1 Ne8 11.Na4 f5 12.f3 Bd7 13.Nxc5 dxc5 14.a3 a4 15.b4 axb3 16.Qxb3 Nd6 17.Qe3 b6 18.Ra1 Qe8 19.Bb2 f4 the start of a Kingside pawn storm. 20.Qf2 g5 21.Bd1 h5 22.h3 Bf6 23.g4 fxg3 24.Qxg3 Qe7 White’s pieces are trapped behind his own pawns and he seeks to free things up on the Queenside. 25.a4 Nf7 26.Nb1 Nh8 27.Nc3 Ng6 28.Ne2 Nf4 29.Nxf4 exf4 forcing the queen to over-extend its protective powers. 30.Qg2 Bxb2 31.Qxb2 Bxh3 32.Re1 g4 33.Qh2 Qh4 34.Be2 Qg5 35.Kh1 Kg7 36.Rg1 Kf6 37.Ra3 Rh8 38.Bd1 Qe5 39.Be2 Ke7 40.Rga1 Kd6 41.a5 White continues to seek space on the wing, but Black has a trick up his sleeve. 41…bxa5 42.Rxa5 Qxa1+! White resigned, in view of… 43.Rxa1 Rxa1+ 44.Qg1 Rxg1+ 45.Kxg1 leaving Black a rook up.

Of the English trio playing in the European Individual Championship in Croatia, David Howell finished strongly to reach 7½/11, with Adams on 7/11 and Keith Arkell on 6 pts. Once the tie-breaks have been calculated, the top 20 will qualify for the next cycle of the World Championship. Howell is close to qualifying but Adams is out of the frame, while Arkell did slightly better than his seeding.

The final round of the WECU inter-county competition took place last Saturday. Devon beat Gloucestershire 10-6 and so regain the Harold Meek Cup (1st teams) to add to the Wayling Cup for the graded section that they had already secured. Devon’s winners were Dominic Mackle, John Wheeler, Mark Abbott, Ian Jamieson, Robert Thompson, Paul Brooks, Andrew Kinder and John Morrison. Draws were obtained by Marco Mattei, Alan Brusey, Stephen Schofield and Ivor Annetts.

Meanwhile, Cornwall were playing Somerset over 14 boards at Exminster. Team captain Anton Barkhuysen led the way with a win against a strong opponent, but only Colin Sellwood and Robin Kneebone could follow suite and they went down 4½-9½.

Here is one of Devon’s wins in which Black has to combine pressure and patience until the big chance presents itself.

White: O. Martin (145). Black: R. Thompson (170).

King’s Indian Defence [E94]

1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 g6 3.Nc3 Bg7 4.e4 d6 5.Nf3 0–0 6.Be2 Na6 7.0–0 e5 8.d5 Nc5 9.Nd2 a5 10.Rb1 Ne8 11.Na4 f5 12.f3 Bd7 13.Nxc5 dxc5 14.a3 a4 15.b4 axb3 16.Qxb3 Nd6 17.Qe3 b6 18.Ra1 Qe8 19.Bb2 f4 the start of a Kingside pawn storm. 20.Qf2 g5 21.Bd1 h5 22.h3 Bf6 23.g4 fxg3 24.Qxg3 Qe7 White’s pieces are trapped behind his own pawns and he seeks to free things up on the Queenside. 25.a4 Nf7 26.Nb1 Nh8 27.Nc3 Ng6 28.Ne2 Nf4 29.Nxf4 exf4 forcing the queen to over-extend its protective powers. 30.Qg2 Bxb2 31.Qxb2 Bxh3 32.Re1 g4 33.Qh2 Qh4 34.Be2 Qg5 35.Kh1 Kg7 36.Rg1 Kf6 37.Ra3 Rh8 38.Bd1 Qe5 39.Be2 Ke7 40.Rga1 Kd6 41.a5 White continues to seek space on the wing, but Black has a trick up his sleeve. 41…bxa5 42.Rxa5 Qxa1+! White resigned, in view of… 43.Rxa1 Rxa1+ 44.Qg1 Rxg1+ 45.Kxg1 leaving Black a rook up.

Of the English trio playing in the European Individual Championship in Croatia, David Howell finished strongly to reach 7½/11, with Adams on 7/11 and Keith Arkell on 6 pts. Once the tie-breaks have been calculated, the top 20 will qualify for the next cycle of the World Championship. Howell is close to qualifying but Adams is out of the frame, while Arkell did slightly better than his seeding.

Taylor, T. (1860-1934)

Thomas Taylor    (1860 – 1934).

TomTaylor

Thomas Taylor was born in 1860 at St. Cleer near Liskeard, Cornwall, the son of William Taylor, a mining engineer from St. Just. The family moved first to St. Ives and by 1888 to Plymouth where Thomas eventually became a manufacturer of waterproofs.

 That year he became a founding member of the newly-formed Plymouth Club. He won the club championship for the first time in 1893 and repeated the feat a further nineteen times, the last time in 1926. He won Devon’s individual championship six times in an eleven year period, and the Winter-Wood Trophy nine times between 1911 and 1924. This was then, as it still is today, a knockout between the champions of the various clubs affiliated to D.C.C.A. This chart illustrates his dominance of Devon chess at this time.

 

 

Championships

 

Year

Plymouth Club

Devon

Individual

Winter-Wood

Shield

1893

Taylor

 

 

1896

Taylor

 

 

1899

Taylor

 

 

1900

Taylor

 

 

1901

Taylor  *

 

 

1902

Taylor

 

 

1903

Taylor

 

 

1906

Taylor

 

 

1910

Taylor

Taylor

 

1911

Taylor

 

Taylor

1912

 

 

Taylor

1914

 

Taylor

 

1915

 

 

Taylor

1916

Taylor

Taylor

Taylor

1917

Taylor

Taylor

Taylor

1919

Taylor

Taylor

Taylor

1920

Taylor

 

 

1921

Taylor

Taylor

Taylor

1922

Taylor

 

 

1924

Taylor

 

Taylor

1926

Taylor

 

Taylor

 

18 titles

6 titles

9 titles

 

Having won the Plymouth Championship trophy for three consecutive seasons in 1901, he was entitled to keep the original trophy which had been donated by Carslake Winter-Wood, whose brother, Edward, donated a replacement cup, which Taylor immediately won.

 Devon’s first Match Captain was C. J. Lambert (q.v.) who resigned in 1903 after two years in office. He was temporarily replaced by Henry Bremridge (q.v.) as an emergency measure, but Taylor soon took over permanently, a post he held for over 30 years until his death. However, he was handicapped by poor eyesight to such an extent that he could not undertake the secretarial duties of the captaincy – a match conductor was always elected to make the arrangements for each match.

 He played at the BCF Congresses three times. At Glasgow in 1911 he came 4th in the Major Open with a score of 6. He also played at Cheltenham in 1913 and Hastings in 1919.

 What games we have of his come from the scorebooks of Ron Bruce, whom he played many times, and may be found in the database of Bruce’s games.

 He is pictured above in 1901 when he lived at 8, Connaught Avenue, Plymouth, a bachelor with his retired father and sister Elizabeth Taylor. He died in 1934, by which time a young Ronald Mackay Bruce had assumed Taylor’s mantle, and who in turn combined a great ability and consistency in the service of Devon chess. However, even in his final year, he had won his games against Cornwall and Somerset on Board 5, and was yet again in the running for his club championship with a score of 7 / 10. He contracted pneumonia suddenly and unexpectedly, and died in the middle of April 1934.

 Below: Taylor as the Grand Old Man of Devon Chess, posing with his county team mates.

taylor#2

A player of such skill and commitment to the county, fully deserves his place in this modest Devon Hall of Fame.

 As Ron Bruce concluded in his BCM obituary, “He was really a wonderful old man, much esteemed and greatly missed”.

 © R. H. Jones. 2010