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New Year Events (16.12.2017.) 964

The first local congresses of 2018 are the Somerset New Year Congress on Saturday & Sunday 13th & 14th January, at the Walton Park Hotel, a beautiful venue overlooking the Severn estuary in  Clevedon, BS21 7BL. Details are obtainable from the organisers, Colin and Rebecca Gardiner on 01209-217210 (before 9 p.m.), or e-mail congresssecretary @hotmail.com.

Following that is the Simon Bartlett Memorial Chess Congress for Friday to Sunday 26th to 28th January at the Livermead House Hotel, Torquay. Details may be found on the Bude Chess Club website www.budechess.co.uk. Although there have already been two large events at this popular sea-front venue this Autumn, the prize fund of £2,300 should attract entries.

Simon Bartlett (1954 – 2017), one of the most regular players on the Westcountry congress circuit was born in Paignton, eventually taking a degree in chemistry at Bristol University. He spent most of his career at Key Organics in Camelford, before he was diagnosed with a brain tumour which proved fatal.

Here is a game of his from the 2013 Torquay Open in which he beats Arkell; not the Grandmaster, Keith Arkell, but his brother Nick.

White: S. Bartlett (1943). Black: N. Arkell.

Pillsbury Defence [B07]

1.e4 d6 2.d4 g6 3.Nc3 Bg7 4.Be3 c6 5.Qd2 Nd7 6.Bd3 Qc7 7.f4 White goes for a strong pawn centre. 7…b5 8.Nf3 Bb7 9.Ne2 Ngf6 10.Ng3 a6 11.f5 c5 12.c3 0–0–0 13.0–0 c4 14.Bc2 d5 15.Bf4 Qb6 16.e5 Ne4 17.Qe1 Playable was 17.Bxe4 after which 17…dxe4 18.Ng5 Bd5 19.Nxf7 Bxf7 20.e6 Bxe6 21.fxe6 Qxe6 22.Rae1 etc. 17…Nxg3 18.Qxg3 h6 19.fxg6 fxg6 20.Qxg6 Qxg6 21.Bxg6 Rdf8 22.Bg3 Nb6 23.Nh4 Kd8 24.Nf5 Rhg8 25.Bh7 Bc8 Probably best 26.Bxg8 Bxf5 Now Black must win the exchange back, leaving White just the pawn up. 27.Rxf5 Rxf5 28.Be6 Rf8 29.b3 h5 30.Rf1 White cannot allow Black to dominate the open file. 30…Rxf1+ 31.Kxf1 Bh6 32.Ke2 Ke8 33.Be1 Kf8 34.Bd2 Bxd2 35.Kxd2 Time now for the kings to do some work. 35…Kg7 36.Ke3 Kg6 37.g3 h4 38.Kf4 hxg3 39.hxg3 Kg7 40.Bf5 A much better square for the white-square bishop, which must have scope to move freely. 40…cxb3 41.axb3 a5 42.Bb1 White has to beware of Black’s outside pawn which could prove a lasting threat later on. 42…a4 43.Ba2 If 43.bxa4 bxa4 and White will be tied down watching that a-pawn. 43…e6 One would think g4 would be the natural move, but White has a plan. 44.Ke3 Kg6 45.Kd2 Kf5 46.bxa4 Nxa4 47.Kc2 This is just a ruse to encourage Black’s king forward. 47…Kg4?? He falls for it. 48.Bxd5 exd5 49.e6 Catch-me-if-can – it must queen. 1–0

In last week’s position, White can play 1.Nf3 and if Black replies 1…Kc3 2.Nc2 mate.

This position arose in a game earlier this year. Black is itching to get in 1…e3+, but it’s not his move. Will this fact be of any help to White?

White to play and avoid defeat.

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