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March 2017
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Exotic Wijk aan Zee (28.01.2017.)

After Hastings, the next event on the European chess circuit is that held in the Dutch village of Wijk aan Zee, (pop. 2,400) but sponsored by the nearby steelworks, formerly Hoogovens, then Corus and now Tata.

The top Masters Section reads like the membership of some exotic United Nations committee, namely M. Carlsen, (Norway). W. So (Philippines-born). S. Karjakin, I. Nepomniachtchi  & D. Andreikin (all Russia); L. Aronian (Armenia); P. Harikrishna & B. Adhiban (both India): P. Eljanov (Ukraine); R. Wojtaszek (Poland); Y. Wei (China); R. Rapport (Hungary); L. Van Wely & A. Giri (both Netherlands). Even the “local” player, Anish Giri, has a Nepalese father, Russian mother and spent much of his childhood in Japan.

Here is his Rd. 6 win after 5 draws.

White: Anish Giri (2773). Black: Ian Nepomniachtchi (2767)

Sicilian Defence – Najdorf Var. [B91]

1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 a6 6.g3 e5 7.Nde2 Be7 8.Bg2 Nbd7 9.a4 b6 10.Nd5 Nxd5 11.Qxd5 Rb8 12.Nc3 0–0 13.0–0 Bb7 14.Qd1 Rc8 15.Re1 h6 16.Bh3 Rc6 White sees how to win a pawn and disrupt Black’s defences. 17.Bxh6! gxh6 18.Qg4+ Bg5 19.Qxd7 Qxd7 20.Bxd7 Rc7 21.Bf5 Bd2 22.Red1 Bxc3 23.bxc3 Rd8 24.Rab1 Rc6 25.f4 exf4 26.e5 Bc8 27.Be4 Rxc3 28.Rxd6 Rxd6 29.exd6 Rc4 If 29…fxg3 30.Rxb6 30.Bd3 Rc6 31.Rd1 setting a trap – if 31…Rxd6 32.Bh7+ winning the rook. 32.Bxa6 fxg3 33.hxg3 and the advanced d-pawn will prove decisive. 1–0

The solution to last week’s 2-mover was 2.Ra4! and whatever Black tries will be met by different mates.

The final round of the British Chess Problem Solving Championship takes place on Saturday 18th February at Eton College. The competition started last summer with the publication of the “Starter Problem”, in this case a 2-mover by John Rice. Prospective competitors were invited to send in their solutions, and those with the correct key move were sent a set of 8 further problems of varying types and difficulty, to be returned to the organiser by the end of November. Anyone with a good score was invited to the final. The list of qualifiers for this year may be found on the event website.

Here is that starter problem from June 2016, the solution to which was 1.Qb4! threatening 2.Qc4#. Black’s 5 efforts to escape and White’s replies were as follows: 1…Rxb4  2. Nxb4#.

1…Rc5    2.Nb6#.

1…Sc6    2.Nc7#.

1…Bc5    2.Qe4#.

1…Bxe5  2.Rxe5#.

Incorrect solutions submitted, together with Black’s refutations, were as follows:-

Claim            Refutation(s)

1.Qf4?            1…Nf5!

1.Nb6+?         1…Rxb6!

1.Qxg5?         1…B any move!

1.Qa5?           1…B any move! & 1…Nf5!

1.Qc1?           1…Bc3!

1.Qe2?          1…Be3! & 1…Nf5!

1.Qg2+?        1…Nxg2!

1.Rc5+?         1…Bxc5! & 1…Rxc5!

1.Nb4+?         1…Rxb4!

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