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British Championships Get Under Way (29.07.2016.)

The British Championship started on Monday at the Bournemouth Pavilion and continues until next Friday. Of the 86 entries in the Championship section itself, 11 are GMs, namely, in order of strength, Michael Adams; David Howell; Gawain Jones; Nick Pert; Mark Hebden; Tamas Fodor; Danny Gormally; John Emms; Keith Arkell; Chris Ward & Peter Wells. Cornishman Adams must be clear favourite, but there are other Westcountry residents in the mix, including Jack Rudd (Bideford), Brian Hewson (Tiverton), Jeremy Menadue (Truro), Steve Dilleigh & Carl Bicknell (both Bristol).

Games may be followed live on the event website – britishchesschampionships.co.uk.

A feature of the early rounds in this kind of tournament, the Swiss system, is that the grandmasters are drawn against opponents from halfway down the list and one can expect quite a few “massacres”, but this time most lasted up to 50 or 60 moves as the GMs played carefully, having no wish to finish up with egg on their faces by starting off with a surprise loss.

Here is an exception from Rd. 2.

White: K.C. Arkell (241). Black: Freddy Hand (192)

Queen’s Gambit Accepted [D23]

1.d4 d5 2.Nf3 Nf6 3.c4 c6 4.Qc2 Unusual, but White clearly wishes to guide his highly-graded, 13 year old opponent onto less familiar territory, and gets his queen active on the queenside right from the start. 4…dxc4 5.Qxc4 Bg4 6.Nbd2 Nbd7 7.g3 e6 8.Bg2 Be7 9.0–0 0–0 10.Ne5 Bh5 Not 10…Nxe5? because of 11.dxe5 and Black must lose either bishop or knight. 11…b5. 11.Ndf3 Rc8 12.Bg5 c5 13.Rac1 h6 14.Nxd7 Nxd7 15.Bxe7 Qxe7 16.Rfd1 The rooks are connected laterally and have the promise of activity down the files ahead of them. 16…Nb6 16…cxd4 17.Qxc8 Rxc8 18.Rxc8+ Kh7 19.Nxd4 and given their open lines, the 2 rooks should be slightly stronger than the queen. 17.Qb5 Rfd8 18.Qa5 continuing the queenside probing. 18…Bxf3 19.Bxf3 cxd4 20.Qxa7 Qb4 21.Rxc8 Rxc8 22.Bxb7 Establishing 2 passed pawns. 22…Rc5 23.b3 Ra5 Black rightly wants to attack the pawns, but White’s open lines enable him to prevent this.  24.Qb8+ Kh7 25.Be4+ f5 26.Bb1 Rb5 27.Qf4 Threatening d4. 27…Rd5 28.Rc1 Rightly grabbing the open file. 28…Rd7 29.Qe5 Threatening e5.  29…Re7 30.Rd1 Nd5 Black’s hoping to get in Nc3 forking rook and bishop, but White has a clever resource. 31.Bxf5+ winning 2 pawns. 31…exf5 32.Qxf5+ Kh8 33.Qxd5 Rxe2 34.Qxd4 1–0 Resigns. Not 34.Rxd4? because of 34… Qe1+ 35.Kg2 Qxf2+ 36.Kh3 Qxh2+ 37.Kg4 Rxa2 and the win seems to have evaporated.

Last week’s position was easily solved by 1.QxR+! If Black takes the queen either of the white rooks can come to the h-file to administer mate, or if he retreats to g8 the queen herself mates on g7.

Here we have a position from a 1999 game by John Emms (W). What winning move did he have?

White to play

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