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British Championship Best Game Prize.

The recent British Ladies Championship in Coventry was won by the diminutive 13 year old Surrey schoolgirl, Akshaya  Kalaiyalahan. She is the 3rd 13 yr old to win the title, the first being Elaine Saunders (later Pritchard) at Bournemouth in 1939, followed by Humpy Koneru at Torquay in 2000. She scored 6½/11, achieved a Women’s IM norm and took the prize for the best performance in the Championship by a player graded under 2000. She was probably favourite for that particular prize as her grade was 1999, while her grade for the tournament was 2335.

Next year’s championship will be held at Bournemouth.

The Alexander Prize for the Game of the Tournament went to Glenn Flear for his win in Round 4. The two opponents were born within 12 months of each other in Leicester in the late 1950s, and know each other’s strengths and weaknesses very well.

White: Glenn Flear (2450). Black:  Mark Hebden (2500).  King’s Indian Defence – Averbakh Variation.

1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 g6 3.Nc3 Bg7 4.e4 d6 5.Be2 0–0 6.Bg5 Averbakh’s line. 6…c6 More usual here is 6…c5 hitting more directly at White’s centre. 7.Nf3 Also playable is 7.Qd2 or 7.f4 setting up the 4 Pawns Attack, but White prefers this more conservative line. 7…Na6 8.0–0 h6 9.Be3 Ng4 Pushing the bishop back, but the knight is not tenable on g4. 10.Bc1 e5 11.h3 exd4 12.Nxd4 Nf6 13.Re1 Re8 14.Bf3 Nd7 15.Be3 Ne5 Again the knight tries to establish a forward position, but will become a target once more. 16.Be2 Nc5 17.Qd2 Qh4 18.f4 Ned7 19.Bf3 a5 20.Bf2 Qe7 21.Rad1 Nb6 22.b3 a4 23.Qc2 axb3 24.axb3 Nbd7 Compromising the development of the white-square bishop. 25.b4 Na6 26.b5 Nb4 27.Qb3 c5 28.Nc2 Nxc2 29.Nd5! a useful zwischenzug, or in-between move. 29…Qd8 30.Qxc2 Nb6 31.e5 Bf5 32.Qb3 dxe5 33.Bxc5 Nxd5 34.Bxd5 Qc7? Black’s position is now getting worse by the move. Better was 34…Qc8. 35.Bd6! Qa5 If 35…Qxd6?? 36.Bxf7+ wins the queen. 36.fxe5 Be6 37.Bxe6 Rxe6 38.c5 Giving White a vice-like grip on the centre. 38…Rae8 39.Rf1 Now focussing on f7. 39…Qd8 40.Qf3 Qd7 41.c6 bxc6 42.bxc6 Qa7+ 43.Kh1 f5 44.c7 Bxe5 45.Bxe5 Rxe5 46.Qb3+ Kh8 47.Rd7 Qa6 48.Rg1 1-0. White has multiple threats on b8, d8 and f7.

The next big event in the area is the Paignton Congress, which starts on Sunday 13th September. Entries are relatively low at the moment, so there is plenty of room for more players. Enquiries should be directed to the Entry Secretaries, Alan & Linda Crickmore on 01752-768206 or e-mail: plymouthchess@btinternet.com.

In last week’s position, Carlsen could afford to take the knight because then his passed pawn would be able to make forward progress viz 1.RxN and if RxR 2.b7 Rb5 3.pb8=Q RxQ 4.BxR.

In this game, Black has plenty of piece activity but is still vulnerable.

Can you see where?

White to win in 2 moves

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