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Archive for January, 2017

Exotic Wijk aan Zee (28.01.2017.)

After Hastings, the next event on the European chess circuit is that held in the Dutch village of Wijk aan Zee, (pop. 2,400) but sponsored by the nearby steelworks, formerly Hoogovens, then Corus and now Tata.

The top Masters Section reads like the membership of some exotic United Nations committee, namely M. Carlsen, (Norway). W. So (Philippines-born). S. Karjakin, I. Nepomniachtchi  & D. Andreikin (all Russia); L. Aronian (Armenia); P. Harikrishna & B. Adhiban (both India): P. Eljanov (Ukraine); R. Wojtaszek (Poland); Y. Wei (China); R. Rapport (Hungary); L. Van Wely & A. Giri (both Netherlands). Even the “local” player, Anish Giri, has a Nepalese father, Russian mother and spent much of his childhood in Japan.

Here is his Rd. 6 win after 5 draws.

White: Anish Giri (2773). Black: Ian Nepomniachtchi (2767)

Sicilian Defence – Najdorf Var. [B91]

1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 a6 6.g3 e5 7.Nde2 Be7 8.Bg2 Nbd7 9.a4 b6 10.Nd5 Nxd5 11.Qxd5 Rb8 12.Nc3 0–0 13.0–0 Bb7 14.Qd1 Rc8 15.Re1 h6 16.Bh3 Rc6 White sees how to win a pawn and disrupt Black’s defences. 17.Bxh6! gxh6 18.Qg4+ Bg5 19.Qxd7 Qxd7 20.Bxd7 Rc7 21.Bf5 Bd2 22.Red1 Bxc3 23.bxc3 Rd8 24.Rab1 Rc6 25.f4 exf4 26.e5 Bc8 27.Be4 Rxc3 28.Rxd6 Rxd6 29.exd6 Rc4 If 29…fxg3 30.Rxb6 30.Bd3 Rc6 31.Rd1 setting a trap – if 31…Rxd6 32.Bh7+ winning the rook. 32.Bxa6 fxg3 33.hxg3 and the advanced d-pawn will prove decisive. 1–0

The solution to last week’s 2-mover was 2.Ra4! and whatever Black tries will be met by different mates.

The final round of the British Chess Problem Solving Championship takes place on Saturday 18th February at Eton College. The competition started last summer with the publication of the “Starter Problem”, in this case a 2-mover by John Rice. Prospective competitors were invited to send in their solutions, and those with the correct key move were sent a set of 8 further problems of varying types and difficulty, to be returned to the organiser by the end of November. Anyone with a good score was invited to the final. The list of qualifiers for this year may be found on the event website.

Here is that starter problem from June 2016, the solution to which was 1.Qb4! threatening 2.Qc4#. Black’s 5 efforts to escape and White’s replies were as follows: 1…Rxb4  2. Nxb4#.

1…Rc5    2.Nb6#.

1…Sc6    2.Nc7#.

1…Bc5    2.Qe4#.

1…Bxe5  2.Rxe5#.

Incorrect solutions submitted, together with Black’s refutations, were as follows:-

Claim            Refutation(s)

1.Qf4?            1…Nf5!

1.Nb6+?         1…Rxb6!

1.Qxg5?         1…B any move!

1.Qa5?           1…B any move! & 1…Nf5!

1.Qc1?           1…Bc3!

1.Qe2?          1…Be3! & 1…Nf5!

1.Qg2+?        1…Nxg2!

1.Rc5+?         1…Bxc5! & 1…Rxc5!

1.Nb4+?         1…Rxb4!

Simon Bartlett R. I. P.

Simon Bartlett, one of the most regular figures on the schess scene in Devon & Cornwall, passed away on Wednesday evening, after a short but brave fight against an aggressive form of cancer.

His great friend over the years, Ivor Annetts, broke the news yesterday morning, as follows:-

It saddens me greatly to have to inform you that my dear friend, Simon Bartlett, passed away last evening.  His partner, Margaret, telephoned me with the news this morning.

As you probably know, in August last year he was diagnosed with an incurable brain tumour and was given between three and sixth months to live; he managed four and a bit.

Simon was a self-confessed chess obsessive.  You will have come to know him because of that.  He would have been 63 in just over two weeks time.

I will inform you of the funeral arrangements as soon as they are made known to me.  In due course I will attempt an obituary for Chess Devon and Keverel Chess.

The words of Brian Hewson come to mind as I write.  Brian’s reaction to the news of Simon’s diagnosis was: “This is terrible news. He is such a great bloke!.”

Ivor Annetts.

Simon was noted for his exotic shirts, which brightened up many a photograph that I took at various events. Here are a couple that jump off the page.

Simon, appearing to offer up a prayer before the start of play at the Seniors' Congress in Exmouth.

Simon & Ivor Annetts playing for Tiverton in the Devon Team Blitz Tournament

Devon’s Inter-Area Jamboree Results. (21. 01.2017.)

Devon’s annual Inter-Area Jamboree took place in Plymouth on Sunday. The hope is always that teams of 12 will enter from the North, South, East and West of the county. In practice, the North has too few players to be able to field a team, while any East captain has the problem of trying to liaise with five quite active but well-spaced out clubs, from Tiverton to Seaton. The South and West, on the other hand, are able to base their teams mostly on just one club each, Plymouth and Newton Abbot. This year only the South and West could raise teams. Both were near the maximum permitted strength and the final result was in doubt right to the end, with the West retaining the trophy, winning 7-5. South names first in each pairing.

1.A. Brusey (165) ½-½ S. Levy (177). 2. M. Wilson (158) 0-1 D. Twine (165). 3. V. Ramesh (154) 1-0 N. J. Butland (150). 4. C. Howard (156) 0-1 M. Quinn (146). 5. J. Allen (141) 0-1 M. Stinton-Brownbridge (145). 6. J. Blackmore (138) 1-0 A. Hart-Davis (139). 6. J. Ariss (123) 0-1 R. Wilby (137). 8. N. F. Tidy (122) 0-1 P. McConnell (126). 9. B. Sturt (118)  ½-½ G. Banks (123). 10. N. Narayanan (119)1-0 J. Dean (121). 11. M. Cockerton (115) 1-0 A. Crickmore (110). 12. M. Hussey (101) 0-1 C. Peach (100).

Here are 2 games kindly sent in by Devon’s Tournament Secretary, Nick Butland. In the first  game the veteran TV presenter misses the danger posed by his schoolboy opponent.

White: Adam Hart-Davis. Black: Joshua Blackmore.

Sicilian Defence – Najdorf Variation.

1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 a6 Najdorf’s key move, partly defence but also preparing for a queenside attack later in the game. 6.Bd3 e6 7.0–0 Be7 8.Be3 0–0 9.Qd2 Ng4 10.Rad1 Nd7 11.Bc4 Nxe3 12.Qxe3 Qb6 13.Bb3 Nf6 14.Kh1 14…Qc7 15.Qg3 Also playable is 15.f4 which is in keeping with White’s traditional aim against the Sicilian of an early kingside attack. 15…Nh5 16.Qh3 g6 17.Qe3 Nf6 18.f4 Qc5 19.Rd3 e5 20.fxe5 dxe5 21.Nf3 Ng4 22.Qd2 Be6 23.Bxe6 fxe6 24.h3 Nf6 25.Rd1 Rfd8 26.Qh6 Rxd3 27.Rxd3 Qf2= Black threatens c2 and hopefully offers a draw. White declines the offer and promptly blunders. 28.Ng5?? Boxing in his own queen. 28…Bf8 0–1

White: D. Twine Black: M. Wilson.

Sicilian Defence – Closed System.

1.e4 c5 2.Nc3 Nc6 3.f4 g6 4.Bb5 Nd4 5.a4 Bg7 6.Nf3 a6 7.Bc4 e6 8.0–0 Ne7 9.d3 0–0 10.Nxd4 cxd4 11.Ne2 d5 12.Bb3 dxe4 13.dxe4 Qb6 14.Kh1 Rd8 15.Rf3 Nc6 16.Bd2 Bd7 17.Qe1 Rac8 18.a5 Qb5 19.Ba4 Qc5 20.e5 Bf8 21.Ng3 Nb4?? 22.Ne4 Nxc2 23.Qh4? 23.Nf6+ Kh8 24.Qh4 leaves Black struggling to survive.; or 23.Rh3 Be7 24.Nxc5 Nxe1 25.Nxd7 Nc2 26.Rc1 leaves White a piece up. 23…Be7? 24.Qh6 Nxa1 25.Nxc5? 25…Bf8 26.Qh4 Bxc5 27.Bd1 Bf8 28.Rh3 h5 29.Bxh5 Bg7 30.Bd1 Re8 31.Bb4 f5 32.exf6 Kf7 33.fxg7 Rc1 34.g8Q+ 1–0.

In last week’s position, the White king was effectively trapped in the centre enabling 1…Bh4+ forcing 2.g3 followed by Nxf3+ forking king and queen.

Here is a new 2-mover, just sent in by Dave Howard. White to move.

White to mate in 2.