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Archive for October, 2016

Beacon Seniors Congress – Entries as at 27.10.2016.

Royal Beacon Seniors Congress 2016
Entry form below
Royal Beacon Hotel, Exmouth 31.10. –  04.11.
Bold = most recent before Red

Red = New since last posting

Entries as at 27.10.2016
198 Johnson Jim Dartford
187 Zavanelli Max Withdrawn
185 Norman Ken Wokingham
184 Myall Ivan Chelmsford
182 Hall Richard V. M. Gt. Lytton
179 Everson Robert Dartford
175 Footner Andrew Yeovil
170 Morgan Jamie W. Penwith
170 Mashayekh Majid Maidenhead
168 Adaway William Dorchester
167 Williams Chris Rotherham
166 Marshall Michael Exmouth
162 Ingham Bill Teignmouth
159 Gosling Brian E. Budleigh
157 Price Andrew Leamington
156 Summers Adrian Peterborough
155 Gamble Raymond Derby
151 Annetts Ivor Tiverton
146 Page Martin Insurance
140 Dean Alan Exmouth
140 Sherriff Alan Dartford
140 Smith Ewart Basingstoke
137 Smith Richard Barnstaple
135 Wood Peter Hastings
130 Norman Dinah Wokingham
129 Hunt Ray Seaton
128 Adams Martyn Sidmouth
127 Belt Malcolm Exmouth
127 Harris William Sidmouth
127 Dow Michael Barnstaple
124 Shaddick John Basingstoke
123 Hurn Robert Caerphilly
123 Jones Bob Exmouth
122 Namouk Omer Hastings
122 Errington Paul Bournemouth
121 Dean John Plymouth
121 Stonebridge Alan Wellington
118 Spooner Keith Withdrawn
109 Lucas Peter Eastbourne
107 Waters Roger Taunton
106 Jones Sid Dorchster
106 Dean Michael Hastings
101 Burt David Bournemouth
97 Welch Hazel Seaton
89 Cox Marion Southampton
86 Cox Reg Southampton
70 Maloney Tom Northampton
“Juniors Section” (50-64 yrs)
190 Bolt Graham Exeter
182 Waddington Mike Dorchester
181 Heppell Ian Wimbledon
178 Cutmore Martin Folkestone
177 Cutmore David Albany
174 Brown Alan Northampton
172 Hurst Kevin Withdrawn
163 Botham Paul Ipswich
161 McAllan Ian Sidcup
160 Dean Steve Seaton
154 Sellwood Colin Camborne
151 Murray Steve Exmouth
146 Edwards Derek Witney
134 Rogers Dave Exmouth
133 Blencowe Ian Gloucester
130 Jackson Paul Bournemouth
124 Fotheringham Gregor Tiverton
110 Newcombe Barbara Exmouth

The Trumpovsky Gambit

Ivor Annetts has just contacted me with the following story from the Trump – Clinton battle for the Presidency. As there’s insufficient time to get it in any of the usual printed magazine outlets before the election takes place, I thought it would be appropiate to post it here before the moment is missed.

Ivor writes as follows:-

I have just heard that FIDE, the World Chess Federation, has banned all American chess players – most of them liberal elitists from the East and West Coasts – from using the Trumpowsky opening (1.d4 Nf6 2. Bg5) until after November 8th. FIDE claims that the ban is essential to prevent outbreaks of violence in American tournament halls.

An instant poll by CNN showed that Hillary Clinton’s approval rating sank to -62 on the news. A later Fox Newspoll put the figure at -97.4.

A secretly recorded tape then surfaced which appears to show Donald Trump claiming to be the grandson of the one-time Brazilian Chess Champion, Octavio Trumpowsky. Trump later denied that it was him after John Podesta, the Clinton Campaign Chair, suggested, in a CNN interview, that it was now quite clear that Trump was not actually an American citizen.

The Clinton campaign team have blamed the whole brouhaha on Kirsan Ilyumzhinov, the Russian President of FIDE, and accuses him of ‘manufacturing a cheap publicity stunt and of outrageous interference in the American democratic process’.

It may all seem bizarre, but then everything in the campaign so far has been pretty weird.

NB: Please address all comments to Ivor.

Devon Beat Cornwall at Plymouth (22.10.2016.)

Devon and Cornwall met at Plymouth recently in their first match of the new season. Cornwall were competitive in the top half of the team, winning or drawing 4 of the top 8 games, but Devon’s strength in depth meant they won 7 of the lower 8 games, to give the overall score of 4 -12 a one-sided look. The details were as follows (Cornish names 1st in each pairing).

1.J. Menadue (189) ½-½ D. Mackle (208). 2.M. Hassall (183) 0-1 T. Paulden (187). 3. J. Hooker (177) 1-0 S. Homer (190). 4.L. Retallick (176) 0-1 P. O’Neill (185). 5.D. Saqui          (176) ½-½ J. Underwood         (183). 6. R. Kneebone (174) 0-1 H. Andolo (181). 7.J. Morgan (170) 0-1 B. Hewson (182). 8.C. Sellwood (154) 1-0 S. Martin. 9.G. Trudeau (153) 0-1 D. Regis (175). 10. P. Gill (149) 0-1 P. Sivrev (175). 11. R. Stephens (148) ½-½ C. Lowe (175). 12.J. Nicholas (147) 0-1 J. Wheeler. (174). 13.R. Smith (141)     0-1 T. Thynne (170). 14.A. Hussain (135) 0-1     O. Wensley (168). 15. D. R. Jenkins (125) 0-1 M. Marshall (166). 16. D. Lucas (121) ½-½ W. Ingham (162).

Here is a win from each team.

White: S. Homer (190). Black: J. Hooker. (177).

Sicilian Defence.

1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 e6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Bd3 Nc6 6.Nxc6 bxc6 7.0–0 d5 8.Nd2 Bd6 9.f4 White follows the general plan in this opening of initiating an early kingside attack, though the threat of a fork in this position is a hollow one. 9…0–0 10.e5 Bc5+ 11.Kh1 Nd7 12.Qh5 Threatening mate. 12…f5 13.g4 If 13.exf6 Nxf6 stopping the mating threat. 13…g6 14.Qh3 Bb7 15.Nf3 Bb6 16.gxf5 exf5 17.b3 Qe7 18.Bb2 c5 19.Rae1 White completes his piece development, but Black’s bishop pair look menacing against the exposed king’s position. 19…c4 20.bxc4 Qb4 21.e6? Better was 21.Ng5 dxc4+ 22.Be4 Bxe4+ 23.Rxe4 h5 (or 23…Qe7 24.Rxc4) 24.Ba3. 21…dxc4 Now both White bishops are attacked, while Black’s bishops are sweeping the board. 22.Ba3 Qxa3 23.Bxc4 Qc3 24.Bb3 Nf6 25.e7+ Rf7 26.Re6 Kg7 27.Re5 Re8 28.Bxf7 Kxf7 29.Re2 Rxe7 30.Rxe7+ Kxe7 31.Re1+?? Probably shortage of time led to White missing the fact that his knight is pinned and therefore not defending his rook. 31…Qxe1+ 0–1

Humphrey Andolo of Plymouth has a relatively modest grade these days, but was Champion of Kenya several times.

White: R. Kneebone (174). Black: H. Andolo. (181)

1.e4 g6 2.d4 Bg7 3.c4 d6 4.Nc3 Nf6 5.h3 0–0 6.Bg5 c5 7.d5 e6 8.Nf3 exd5 9.cxd5 Qa5 10.Bd2 Re8 11.Bd3 c4 12.Be2 If 12.Bxc4 Nxe4 13.Nxe4 Rxe4+ 14.Be2 and White’s position unravels. 2…b5 13.a3 Qb6 14.Be3 Qa5 15.Bd2 Qa6 16.Qb1 Qb7 17.Be3 h6 18.Nd4 a6 19.0–0 Nbd7 20.Qc2 Nc5 21.f3 Bd7 22.b4 cxb3 23.Nxb3 Rac8 24.Nxc5 dxc5 25.Qd2 Kh7 26.Rfb1 c4 27.Bd4 a5?! 28.Na4?! Qc7 29.Nc5?? 29…Bxh3? 29…c3 30.Qd3 Nxd5 31.Nxd7 Nf4. 30.Rxb5 c3 31.Bxc3 Qg3 32.Bf1 Ng4 33.fxg4 Bxc3 0–1.

Last week’s problem was easily solved by either 1.Nc5 or Nb2.

Here is a new 2-mover by Dave Howard.

White to play and mate in 2.

Exmouth Seniors Congress Approaches (15.10.2016.)

The 17th Royal Beacon Seniors Congress starts a fortnight on Monday in the Exmouth sea front hotel. There are some new faces among the regulars, including a former British Ladies Champion, a Correspondence Champion, a Latvian and identical twins. Late entries are still acceptable and a downloadable entry form may be found on chessdevon.org.

Here is a game from the 2005 event with something of an international feel to it.

White: Wim Wender (Netherlands), Black: Brian Ross (Wales),

French Defence [C00]

1.e4 e6 2.Nf3 White nearly always plays  2.d4 here, but the Dutch often like to play in a sharp, unconventional style. 2…d5 3.e5 c5 4.b4 Suddenly this resembles a Sicilian Defence Wing Gambit. 4…a6 Black is perhaps a little wary of accepting the “free” offer: e.g. 4…cxb4 5.a3 Nc6 6.axb4 Bxb4 7.Ba3 Nge7 8.Bxb4 Nxb4 9.c3 Nbc6 10.d4 etc. 5.bxc5 Bxc5 6.d4 Be7 7.a4 b6 8.Bd3 Nc6 9.0–0 Bb7 10.c3 Rc8 11.Qe2 Ra8 12.Qb2 White now brings his queen back over to the queenside and concentrates on looking for play there. 12…Na5 13.Nfd2 g6 14.Na3 Qc7 15.Rb1 Bd8 16.c4 Ne7 17.cxd5 Nxd5 18.Nac4 Nxc4 19.Nxc4 0–0 Having discovered which side Black was going to castle, White’s attack switches sides, and it is the quickness of the switch that is so telling. 20.Bh6 Re8 21.Rfc1 Qb8 Probably the least worst option, with the threat of Nd6 looming. If 21…Qd7 22.Nd6 Re7 It’s often said that with a knight established on the 6th rank, the attack should play itself. 22.Nd6 Re7 23.h4 Rc7 24.h5 Rxc1+ 25.Rxc1 Ne7 26.Ne8 Kh8 27.Qd2 Nd5 28.Nd6 Threatening Nxf7+ Black has no pieces anywhere near his threatened king. 28…Kg8 29.Qe2 Ra7 30.hxg6 fxg6 31.Qg4 Be7 If 31…Bc8 32.Rxc8 Qxc8. 32.Qxe6+ 1-0 Black resigned, in view of 32…Kh8 33.Nf7+ Kg8 34.Nd8+ Kh8 35.Qf7 etc. Just as effective was 32.Bxg6 when Black can still do nothing to stave off mate. Here is another win by the Dutchman from the 2009 event.

White: M. Young. Black: Wim Velker.

Irregular Opening.

1.e4 Nc6 2.f4 d5 3.exd5 Qxd5 4.Nc3 Qa5 5.d4 Nf6 6.Nf3 Bg4 7.Bb5 Nd5 8.Bxc6+ bxc6 9.Bd2 Nxc3 10.bxc3 Qa6 11.Qe2 Qxe2+ 12.Kxe2 e6 13.c4 Be7 14.h3 Bf5 15.c3 f6 16.g4 Bc2 17.Bc1 Rb8 18.Kd2 Be4 19.Ke3 Bc2 20.Rh2 Ba4 21.Ne1 h5 22.gxh5 Rxh5 23.Nd3 c5 24.Kf3 cxd4 25.cxd4 Bc6+ 26.Kg4 Rh7 27.Re2 Kf7 28.Bd2 Rbh8 Black is poised to attack down the h-file, and White has no choices left. 29.Nf2 f5+ 30.Kg3 Bh4+ 31.Kh2 Bxf2 32.Rxf2 Rxh3+ 33.Kg1 Rh1# 0–1

As Black was about to queen with check in last week’s “Pawn Puzzle”, White had to get his check in first and the only way to do this was by “under-promoting” to a knight; hence 1.a8=N+! forcing the king to the back rank, enabling 2.g8=Q mate.

This week’s problem is not quite a pawns-only position, but is from a blitz game earlier this year which means that White had c. 12 seconds to find a winning move. How long will you take to find it?

White to play and win.

Peter Clarke Memorial Results plus Stroud Chess Co.

The winners of Sunday’s 2nd Peter Clarke Memorial RapidPlay in Bude were as follows:- Open Section: 1st Lloyd Retallick (Newquay) 5½/6. 2nd= Simon Bartlett (Newquay) & Brian Gosling (E. Budleigh) 4. Grading prize: Robin Kneebone (Falmouth) 3.

U-140 Section: 1st= Steve Woolgar (Bristol) & Ian Rescorla (Bude) 4. Grading prize:  Richard Smith (Barnstaple) 2½.

A century or so ago, Stroud in Gloucestershire was a busy centre of chess activity. It was home of the British Chess Company, founded by William Moffat (1843 – 1918) and William Hughes. They sold general chess equipment, from scoresheets to instructional books, but particularly sets made in cheaper modern alternatives to the traditional ivory ones made by Jacques, helping to bring them within reach of those with more modest incomes.

Also in the town were the offices of a new chess magazine, The Chess Amateur, started in 1916 and running until 1930, when it may have become a victim of the Great Depression. This was part of a publishing house run in George Street, Stroud, by Harry Harmer of a long-standing local family. Whether the two companies were connected in some way is not clear.

The magazine was lighter and brighter in tone and appearance than the more staid British Chess Magazine, founded in 1880 and still running today. Its regular contributors included Harold Meek, with a “Half Hours” column, who later donated the West of England’s Inter-County trophy, and Carslake Winter-Wood (“News & Notes”). The American, Alain C. White, wrote articles on chess problems and organised solving tournaments, as he also did for BCM. Also, when he started editing his famous Christmas Series of problem books (44 titles between 1905 and 1934, and now highly collectable), the majority were printed in Stroud.

It is, perhaps, no coincidence that the demise of the The Chess Amateur in 1930 led B. H. Wood to spot a gap in the market which he was happy to fill in 1935 when he founded his Chess magazine, which he ran for over half a century.

I recently acquired a small 32p booklet entitled Fifty Pawn Problems, published by the British Chess Company of Stroud and costing 4d (1½p). It gives no date or author, but it has been stated elsewhere that it forms the 1st section of a later book by J. H. Blake entitled Chess Endings For Beginners which went to a 2nd edition in 1901. This would strongly suggest that my booklet is in fact by the Hampshire man, Joseph Henry Blake (1859 – 1951), and must have been published c. 1895.

In last week’s position, Black could achieve both his aims of avoiding mate and maintaining his material advantage by playing Qe7! which places an additional attacking piece on the advanced rook, and cannot be taken because of Rd1 mate.

Here is position No. 6 from that penny ha’penny booklet, with the instruction White to play and mate in 2.

White to play and mate in 2

West of England Jamboree Result Details (01.10.2016.)

Details of the recent West of England Jamboree are as follows (C = Cornwall; D = Devon & S = Somerset.)

1.D. Mackle (D1) 0 -1 M. Turner (S1). 2. J. Rudd (S2) 1-0 J. Menadue (C1). 3.M Hassall (C2) 1-0 S. Homer (D2). 4.T. Paulden (D3) ½-½ J. Hooker (C3). 5.L. Retallick (C4-176) 0-1 T. Goldie (S3). 6.M. Staniforth (S4) 0-1 P. O’Neill (D4). 7.J. Underwood (D5) 1-0 F. Feliciano (S5). 8.A. Footner (S6) 1-0 R. Kneebone (C5). 9.G Trudeau (C6) 0-1 B. Hewson (D6). 10.D. Regis (D7) 1-0 P. Gill (C7). 11.R. Stephens (C8) ½-½ D. Freeman (S7). 12.G. Jepps (S8) 0-1 O. Wensley (D8). 13.M. Marshall (D9) 1-0 A. Champion (S9). 14.R. Knight (S10) 1-0 R. Clark (C9). 15.A. Hussain (C10) 1-0 M. Shaw (D10). 16. P. Hampton (D11-161) 1-0 G Lingard (default -C11). 17.D. P. Jenkins (C12) ½-½ C. Purry (S11). 18. L. Bedialauneta (S12) 0-1 W. Ingham (D12). Dev. = 8½; Som. = 6; Corn.= 3½.

Here is the game between a Devon newcomer and a Somerset regular.

White: M. O. Marshall (166). Black: A. A. Champion (153).

1.c4 b6 2.Nf3 Bb7 3.Nc3 g6 4.d4 Bg7 5.e4 White accepts the invitation to set up a strong pawn centre. 5…e6 6.Bg5 Ne7 7.Bd3 d6 8.0–0 Nd7 9.Qd2 h6 10.Be3 Nf6 11.h3 g5 12.Nh2 Ng6 13.Rad1 Qe7 14.Bc2 0–0 Black seems well-defended on the kingside, so White seeks to expand on the other wing. 15.b4 e5 16.d5 a5 17.a3 axb4 18.axb4 Ra3 19.Ra1 Rfa8 20.Rxa3 Rxa3 21.Rb1 Qd7 22.c5 As Black’s b-pawn is pinned he cannot afford any pawn exchanges here, yet is threatened by a potential fork. 22…Qd8 23.cxd6 cxd6 24.Nb5 Ra8 25.Rc1 Ba6 26.Nc3 Bc4 27.Bd3 Bxd3 28.Qxd3 Ra3?! This rook cuts a lone figure for the rest of the game. 29.Qb5 Nd7?! 30.Qc6 Bf8 31.Nb5+- Rb3 32.Qc4 Rb2 33.g3 Qa8 34.Qc6 There now follows some repetition with the aim of reaching the time control at move 40 as quickly as possible. 34…Qd8 35.Qc4 Qa8 36.Qc6 Qd8 37.Ra1? Or 37.Nxd6 Rxb4 38.Ng4 h5 39.Nb7 Qe7 40.d6 Qe6 41.Qxd7 Qxd7 42.Nf6 etc. 37…Rxb4 38.Ra8 Qxa8?! 38…Nb8 39.Qb7 Rxb5 40.Ng4 Kg7 41.Rxb8 Qe7 42.Qc6 Rb4 43.Bxb6. 39.Qxa8+- Rxb5 Black has lost his queen, but has a rook, knight and pawn for it, potentially roughly equivalent, though Black’s minor pieces are very cramped whereas the queen has open lines to exploit. 40.Kg2 Nc5 41.Ng4 Kg7 42.f3 42.Bxc5 bxc5 43.Ne3. 42…h5 43.Nf2 Be7 44.Qb8 Nd7 45.Qe8 Attacking the pinned knight. 45…Rb1? Better was counter-attack via 45…Rb3 46.Nd1 Rd3 47.Qxd7 Rxd1 48.Bxb6 46.Qxd7 b5 47.Qf5 f6 48.h4 gxh4 49.Qxh5 Qh6+ & Qh7. 49…Nf8 50.Bh6+ 1–0. Black resigned in view of 50…Kg8 51.Qe8 and Black must lose more material.

The key to last week’s 2-mover by John Brown was 1.Qe7! If 1…Bxf4 2. Be4#, or 1…Kxf4 2.Qf6#, or 1…Bf3 2.Qxf7# and finally 1…Bg7 2.Qg5#.

In this position from a game earlier this year Black is a piece up but is about to be mated unless he can find a move that not only avoids mate but maintains his material advantage. He succeeded; can you see how?

Black to play