Search Keverel Chess
Monthly Archive

18th Royal Beacon Seniors’ Congress Results(18.11.2017.) 960

Last week saw the 18th Royal Beacon Seniors Congress held in Exmouth, with a long list of winners – over a third of the players took home prizes, and here are some (all points out of 5):

Seniors Section (65+): 1st Ivan Myall 4½ (£100); 2nd= Steve Berry; Mike Wiltshire & Bill Ingham (Teignmouth) all 4 (£60). Grading Prize (U-155) 1st= Brian Gosling (E. Budleigh) & A. Hibbitt both 3½ (£25) .

Junior Section (50–64): 1st Steve Dilleigh (Bristol) 4 (£100). 2nd= Alan Brown; Mike Waddington (Dorchester) & Jon Wells. All 3½ (£60). Grading prizes: (U-175): 1st= Steve Dean (Seaton) & Tim Spanton both 3. U-160 1st Paul Jackson 3 (Bournemouth). (U-135) 1st= Ian Blencowe (Gloucester); Graham Hillman (Wimborne) & Susan Selley (Exmouth) all 2½.

One of the biggest surprises of the week occurred in Rd. 2 of the Seniors section. Stephen Berry was the top graded player and expected to win, but came a cropper here.

White: W. Adaway (165). Black: S. Berry (202).

Alekhine’s Defence [B05]

1.e4 Nf6 Alekhine’s Defence, tempting White’s pawns forward so they possibly overreach themselves and become weak targets. 2.e5 Nd5 3.d4 d6 4.Nf3 Bg4 5.Be2 e6 6.0–0 Be7 7.h3 Bh5 8.c4 Nb6 9.exd6 cxd6 10.Nc3 0–0 11.Be3 N8d7 12.Rc1 Bxf3 13.gxf3 If 13.Bxf3 White loses a pawn to 13…Nxc4. 13…e5 14.f4 exd4 15.Qxd4 Nc5 16.Rfd1 Qc8 17.Kh2 Rd8 18.Rg1 Ne6 19.Qe4 Bf6 20.Bxb6! Bxc3 Black seems to have made a grave miscalculation which loses material, though little better was 20…axb6 21.Nd5 threatening either to win the bishop or fork queen & rook on the other wing. 21.Bxd8 Bxb2 22.Rc2 Bd4 23.Bh4 Black emerges from the skirmish a whole rook down and in deep trouble. Can White hold his nerve, as there is activity all over the board? 23…Qc5 24.Bg4 Nxf4 25.Bg3 Ng6 26.Rd1 Be5 27.Bxe5 dxe5 White’s rook pair now take control. 28.Rd5 Qb6 29.Bf5 Rf8 30.c5 Qb1 Equal exchanges will greatly help White’s cause…. 31.Bxg6 hxg6 32.Rxe5 Qd1 33.Qe2 Qd4 34.Qe3 …. but not Black’s. 34…Qa4 35.Rd2 Kh7 36.Re4 Qb5 37.a4 Black has no counterplay and can only dodge the bullets. 37…Qc6 38.Rd6 Qc7 39.Rh4+ Kg8 40.Re4 b6 41.Re8 bxc5 42.Rxf8+ Kxf8 43.Qe5 Kg8 44.Rd5 Qa5 45.Qb8+ Kh7 46.Rd8 g5 47.Rh8+ Kg6 48.Qd6+ f6 White has a mating net based on the white squares. 49.Qd3+ Kf7 50.Qd5+ Kg6 51.Qe4+ Kf7 52.Qe8#

Berry felt a little hurt by this unexpected upset until I pointed out to him that William Adaway was not just an average club player. Before his lengthy absence from the game while he pursued a career, he had had some outstanding results including a draw against the famous Hungarian GM Lajos Portisch in a big London congress and a win against GM Adrian Hollis. He didn’t feel quite so bad knowing that.

Last week’s position was solved by 1.Bf8 after which only Black’s knight can move, and it’s the only piece preventing 2.Qh6 mate.

Here is a similarly deceptive 2-mover. White to play.

White to mate in 2

Leave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Posts